One arm chin ups and elbow tendons

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Feb 20, 2006.

  1. I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted two
    arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    strapped on.

    However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I can
    manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly less
    controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong arm
    for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    strengthening the elbow tendons.

    Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. Ranieri

    Ranieri Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    > fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted two
    > arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    > strapped on.
    >
    > However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    > training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I can
    > manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly less
    > controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    > my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    > training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong arm
    > for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    > of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    > strengthening the elbow tendons.
    >


    Can't help with your question, but I do have an observation: the one armed
    chin is a goal that a lot of people set, but I've yet to hear of a single
    person that has accomplished it. Everyone has a story of a rock climber that
    can do multiple reps, but never have I heard of a regular gym denizen
    diligently training his or her way there.
     
  3. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 10:34:43 -0600, "Ranieri" <nah> wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    >> fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted two
    >> arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    >> strapped on.
    >>
    >> However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    >> training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I can
    >> manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly less
    >> controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    >> my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    >> training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong arm
    >> for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    >> of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    >> strengthening the elbow tendons.
    >>

    >
    >Can't help with your question, but I do have an observation: the one armed
    >chin is a goal that a lot of people set, but I've yet to hear of a single
    >person that has accomplished it. Everyone has a story of a rock climber that
    >can do multiple reps, but never have I heard of a regular gym denizen
    >diligently training his or her way there.
    >


    Elzi Volk claimed in this Group to have done a set of three; I called
    her a lying bitch; she was unable to prove her vain boast, and even
    her beau at the time, a regular here, opted not to protect or support
    her!

    They are incredibly difficult!

    http://www.beastskills.com/OneArmPull.htm
     
  4. Yes, a genuine one arm chin from a dead hang is very difficult. A lot
    of people who claim they can do them are probably bullshitting or
    cheating.

    At present, I can pull myself up only about 3 inches with one arm.
    That's sounds like nothing but it's a start. It helps that my BW is
    only about 70 kg. I have not trained for a 1 armer before so it will
    take time. I may not achieve one but even if I don't I expect the
    training will improve my weighted 2 armers.
     
  5. Ranieri

    Ranieri Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Yes, a genuine one arm chin from a dead hang is very difficult. A lot
    > of people who claim they can do them are probably bullshitting or
    > cheating.
    >
    > At present, I can pull myself up only about 3 inches with one arm.
    > That's sounds like nothing but it's a start. It helps that my BW is
    > only about 70 kg. I have not trained for a 1 armer before so it will
    > take time. I may not achieve one but even if I don't I expect the
    > training will improve my weighted 2 armers.
    >


    "If you manage to do this I will gladly eat a shit sandwich."
    -George UK in response to Krista's quest for the 1 armed pullup
     
  6. On Mon, 20 Feb 2006 12:02:50 -0600, "Ranieri" <nah> wrote:

    >"If you manage to do this I will gladly eat a shit sandwich."


    Which would differ from your regular diet in what way?
     
  7. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    Ranieri wrote:

    >>

    >
    > Can't help with your question, but I do have an observation: the one armed
    > chin is a goal that a lot of people set, but I've yet to hear of a single
    > person that has accomplished it. Everyone has a story of a rock climber that
    > can do multiple reps, but never have I heard of a regular gym denizen
    > diligently training his or her way there.
    >
    >


    IIRC, Steve here does them. I've done one where

    the lazy hand grabs the wrist of the strong hand, but that's my best
     
  8. Ranieri

    Ranieri Guest

    "Paul Cassel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Ranieri wrote:
    >
    >>>

    >>
    >> Can't help with your question, but I do have an observation: the one
    >> armed chin is a goal that a lot of people set, but I've yet to hear of a
    >> single person that has accomplished it. Everyone has a story of a rock
    >> climber that can do multiple reps, but never have I heard of a regular
    >> gym denizen diligently training his or her way there.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > IIRC, Steve here does them. I've done one where
    >
    > the lazy hand grabs the wrist of the strong hand, but that's my best


    I think Steve is on a quest...I don't believe he's done any.
     
  9. "Ranieri" <nah> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Paul Cassel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Ranieri wrote:
    >>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Can't help with your question, but I do have an observation: the one
    >>> armed chin is a goal that a lot of people set, but I've yet to hear
    >>> of a single person that has accomplished it. Everyone has a story of
    >>> a rock climber that can do multiple reps, but never have I heard of
    >>> a regular gym denizen diligently training his or her way there.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> IIRC, Steve here does them. I've done one where
    >>
    >> the lazy hand grabs the wrist of the strong hand, but that's my best

    >
    > I think Steve is on a quest...I don't believe he's done any.


    I haven't done one. I've worked on them in the past but gave up. At my
    level on these, it would take a _lot_ of work. The one hand on the
    wrist kind is actually pretty easy, IMHO. Try holding on lower and
    lower - that's one way to work up to a OAP.

    To the OP: For a starter, you need to be able to two-hand pullup
    yourself plus your bodyweight on a belt before you'll stand a chance at
    a one-armed pullup, IMHO, and I can't do that, either. There are a
    number of articles about doing this on the DragonDoor site. Try this
    link:

    http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode2/Workouts&kbid=1022

    and look at the articles on one-armed pullups. The basic approach I
    used was from here, working one hand plus a few fingers of the second
    hand. I got to the point where I could manage a rep or two with one
    hand plus only the pinkie finger of the other but that's as far as I
    got. The article suggests working these "mountain climber" style, one
    hand over, one hand under so that you're sideways to the bar, since that
    seems to be where most people end up without the other hand to keep them
    facing the bar.

    Last but not least, you have to ask yourself how much "functionality"
    there is to this movement if you're not a rock climber. I feel like
    one-legged work helps my deadlift and squat, but I don't feel like
    getting a OAP is going to do much for me. I'd much rather, e.g., work
    on a freestanding, two-handed handstand and learn to do hand walking.
    Don't ask me why, because I don't think that is terribly "functional"
    either, but it interests me more.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  10. Joe Humble

    Joe Humble Guest

    On 20 Feb 2006 04:55:47 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    >fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted two
    >arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    >strapped on.
    >
    >However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    >training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I can
    >manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly less
    >controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    >my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    >training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong arm
    >for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    >of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    >strengthening the elbow tendons.
    >
    >Thanks


    This is one of those things where a genetic predisposition goes a long
    way and grit/determination don't go all that far at all.


    --
    Is this thing on?
     
  11. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    > fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted
    > two
    > arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    > strapped on.
    >
    > However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    > training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I
    > can
    > manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly
    > less
    > controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    > my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    > training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong
    > arm
    > for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    > of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    > strengthening the elbow tendons.


    Two- and one-armed bar hangs for time. Focus on keeping the elbows and
    shoulders tight. BTW, if you're getting a full-range controlled
    negative, you're doing better than I ever did despite having about the
    same bodyweight and same two-armed weighted pullup max as me. I used to
    drop at the very bottom. Top part of range of motion was difficult,
    middle was relatively easy, bottom was near impossible.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  12. Ranieri <nah> wrote:

    > Can't help with your question, but I do have an observation: the one armed
    > chin is a goal that a lot of people set, but I've yet to hear of a single
    > person that has accomplished it. Everyone has a story of a rock climber that
    > can do multiple reps, but never have I heard of a regular gym denizen
    > diligently training his or her way there.


    The famous Scottish rock climber Robin Smith once chose me to
    demonstrate his party trick because at 120 pounds I was the lightest
    guy in the room. His party trick was to hold me round the waist with
    one arm, and do a pull up with the other. No idea if he trained, but
    he was built like an orang utan.

    When I was 20, and training a few times a week on a specific climb in
    a local quarry which involved one very nasty strenuous move which was
    close to a one armed pull up with the right arm, I ended up being able
    to do a one one-armed pull up with that arm. Not a chin, all I could
    do was lift from a straight hand to a fully bent arm. I suppose you
    could have called it a nose rather than a chin.

    A brief biog of Robin Smith:

    http://heritage.scotsman.com/greatscots.cfm?id=2256322005

    The local Edinburgh quarry on which I trained, South Quarry in
    Salisbury Crags, was also used by Robin Smith and Dougal Haston, and
    is still much used by climbers today. I was never a good climber, more
    of a good scrambler. I've met a couple of other climbers who could do
    a single one arm pullup on their strong arm. I've never met someone
    who trained in a gym who could do it and generally speaking gym muscle
    men tend to be very sceptical about one arm pullups. I think the
    reason is that rock climbers care a lot about body weight and are
    generally on the thin scrawny side, whereas folk who train in gyms
    usually go for weight lifting and muscle bulk and are a lot heavier.

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  13. [email protected] wrote:

    > I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    > fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted two
    > arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    > strapped on.


    > However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    > training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I can
    > manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly less
    > controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    > my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    > training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong arm
    > for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    > of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    > strengthening the elbow tendons.


    If my experience is any guide watch the elbow tendon soreness very
    carefully. At the age of twenty, when I spent lots of time doing
    strenuous rock climbing nearly every day for fun because I lived a few
    hundred yards from a cliff, I became able to do a one arm pullup.

    At the age of 62, after decades of no exercise, I decided to see if I
    could work my way up to doing it again. In a few months I moved from
    only being able to hang twitching from a pullup bar to being able to
    do one pullup. At about 4 pullups I started developing the kind
    of elbow tendon soreness you describe. At 6 pullups it lasted for days
    rather than hours and I was getting very excited by how fast my
    strength was developing. I was adding a pullup to my max reps about
    every fortnight. I regarded the soreness as simply a good sign that I
    had strained things enough to boost strength growth.

    At 8 pullups the tendon soreness just didn't go away, and I discovered
    I had injured my tendons and was going to have to take a break. A year
    later they're a lot better but still haven't recovered. In my weakest
    arm they still hurt slightly, all the time.

    My guess is that after decades of driving a desk for a living my
    tendons had dropped down in strength to match my reduced arm power,
    and that muscles can be grown in strength much faster than tendons.

    I'd be very interested in a method of strengthening tendons too. I
    note that bones grow in strength particularly when when subjected to
    impact shocks, such as in pounding the pavement or chopping wood.
    That gives them better growth signals than simple muscular loading as
    in weight lifting. I haven't been able to find out what best helps
    strengthen tendons.

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  14. "Chris Malcolm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    >> fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted
    >> two
    >> arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    >> strapped on.

    >
    >> However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    >> training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I
    >> can
    >> manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly
    >> less
    >> controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these
    >> negatives
    >> my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    >> training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong
    >> arm
    >> for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am
    >> wary
    >> of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    >> strengthening the elbow tendons.

    >
    > If my experience is any guide watch the elbow tendon soreness very
    > carefully. At the age of twenty, when I spent lots of time doing
    > strenuous rock climbing nearly every day for fun because I lived a few
    > hundred yards from a cliff, I became able to do a one arm pullup.
    >
    > At the age of 62, after decades of no exercise, I decided to see if I
    > could work my way up to doing it again. In a few months I moved from
    > only being able to hang twitching from a pullup bar to being able to
    > do one pullup. At about 4 pullups I started developing the kind
    > of elbow tendon soreness you describe. At 6 pullups it lasted for days
    > rather than hours and I was getting very excited by how fast my
    > strength was developing. I was adding a pullup to my max reps about
    > every fortnight. I regarded the soreness as simply a good sign that I
    > had strained things enough to boost strength growth.
    >
    > At 8 pullups the tendon soreness just didn't go away, and I discovered
    > I had injured my tendons and was going to have to take a break. A year
    > later they're a lot better but still haven't recovered. In my weakest
    > arm they still hurt slightly, all the time.
    >
    > My guess is that after decades of driving a desk for a living my
    > tendons had dropped down in strength to match my reduced arm power,
    > and that muscles can be grown in strength much faster than tendons.
    >
    > I'd be very interested in a method of strengthening tendons too. I
    > note that bones grow in strength particularly when when subjected to
    > impact shocks, such as in pounding the pavement or chopping wood.
    > That gives them better growth signals than simple muscular loading as
    > in weight lifting. I haven't been able to find out what best helps
    > strengthen tendons.


    Chris, what I've read suggests that short, brief shocks tend to
    strengthen and thicken connective tissue. I have a bad back and
    swinging a kettlebell has been a tremendous help to the connective
    tissue in my back - my program combines more traditional weight lifting
    with what we call kettlebell ballistics, which besides the swing include
    several "poor man's versions" of Olympic lifts like the snatch and
    jerk.. I suggest you do a bit of investigating - kettlebell swinging
    also puts a strain on the elbow tendons and, frankly, on much of the
    rest of the body, but it is with a relatively light weight and it might
    be what you're looking for.

    Head over to http://forum.dragondoor.com and ask there.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  15. I'm continuing on with the training and seem to be getting less elbow
    soreness after each session. But I must stress that I'm doing ultra low
    volume training for this. I can do one controlled negative with my
    right arm but if I try to do a second even after a few minutes rest it
    is much less controlled, especially at the top and bottom. The worst
    part about the negatives is working up the "courage" to let go with the
    supporting hand and start dropping. I fear not being able to control
    the drop and injuring myself. I cannot do an isometric hold at the top
    - once I let go with the supporting hand the best I can do is drop
    under control. It takes a lot of concentration and effort and tensing
    of most of the muscles of the upper body to get this control.
     
  16. allbpen

    allbpen Guest

    You can get the pdf guide by Pavel from this site- just register with
    an email account you dont usually use-loads of spam

    http://www.kungfu-torrents.com/
     
  17. Hugh Beyer

    Hugh Beyer Guest

    Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote in news:465muhF9ceh0U1
    @individual.net:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    >> fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted two
    >> arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    >> strapped on.

    >
    >> However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    >> training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I can
    >> manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly less
    >> controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    >> my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    >> training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong arm
    >> for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    >> of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    >> strengthening the elbow tendons.

    >
    > If my experience is any guide watch the elbow tendon soreness very
    > carefully. At the age of twenty, when I spent lots of time doing
    > strenuous rock climbing nearly every day for fun because I lived a few
    > hundred yards from a cliff, I became able to do a one arm pullup.
    >
    > At the age of 62, after decades of no exercise, I decided to see if I
    > could work my way up to doing it again. In a few months I moved from
    > only being able to hang twitching from a pullup bar to being able to
    > do one pullup. At about 4 pullups I started developing the kind
    > of elbow tendon soreness you describe. At 6 pullups it lasted for days
    > rather than hours and I was getting very excited by how fast my
    > strength was developing. I was adding a pullup to my max reps about
    > every fortnight. I regarded the soreness as simply a good sign that I
    > had strained things enough to boost strength growth.
    >
    > At 8 pullups the tendon soreness just didn't go away, and I discovered
    > I had injured my tendons and was going to have to take a break. A year
    > later they're a lot better but still haven't recovered. In my weakest
    > arm they still hurt slightly, all the time.
    >
    > My guess is that after decades of driving a desk for a living my
    > tendons had dropped down in strength to match my reduced arm power,
    > and that muscles can be grown in strength much faster than tendons.
    >
    > I'd be very interested in a method of strengthening tendons too. I
    > note that bones grow in strength particularly when when subjected to
    > impact shocks, such as in pounding the pavement or chopping wood.
    > That gives them better growth signals than simple muscular loading as
    > in weight lifting. I haven't been able to find out what best helps
    > strengthen tendons.
    >


    Interesting... I had bad elbow tendinitis for quite a while, which I
    blamed on DB swings with poor form, but I was also doing weighted chins at
    the time. The tendinitis didn't go away until I gave up doing chins--maybe
    they were the culprit.

    Hugh


    --
    Exercise is a dirty word. Whenever I hear it, I wash my mouth out with
    chocolate. ("Ladi")
     
  18. JMW

    JMW Guest

    Hugh Beyer <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    >>> fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted two
    >>> arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3 bodyweight
    >>> strapped on.

    >>
    >>> However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    >>> training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I can
    >>> manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a slightly less
    >>> controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of these negatives
    >>> my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for about an hour after
    >>> training. I seem to be getting slightly worse soreness in my strong arm
    >>> for some reason. Is this something to worry about or normal. I am wary
    >>> of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has anyone any tips for
    >>> strengthening the elbow tendons.

    >>
    >> If my experience is any guide watch the elbow tendon soreness very
    >> carefully. At the age of twenty, when I spent lots of time doing
    >> strenuous rock climbing nearly every day for fun because I lived a few
    >> hundred yards from a cliff, I became able to do a one arm pullup.
    >>
    >> At the age of 62, after decades of no exercise, I decided to see if I
    >> could work my way up to doing it again. In a few months I moved from
    >> only being able to hang twitching from a pullup bar to being able to
    >> do one pullup. At about 4 pullups I started developing the kind
    >> of elbow tendon soreness you describe. At 6 pullups it lasted for days
    >> rather than hours and I was getting very excited by how fast my
    >> strength was developing. I was adding a pullup to my max reps about
    >> every fortnight. I regarded the soreness as simply a good sign that I
    >> had strained things enough to boost strength growth.
    >>
    >> At 8 pullups the tendon soreness just didn't go away, and I discovered
    >> I had injured my tendons and was going to have to take a break. A year
    >> later they're a lot better but still haven't recovered. In my weakest
    >> arm they still hurt slightly, all the time.
    >>
    >> My guess is that after decades of driving a desk for a living my
    >> tendons had dropped down in strength to match my reduced arm power,
    >> and that muscles can be grown in strength much faster than tendons.
    >>
    >> I'd be very interested in a method of strengthening tendons too. I
    >> note that bones grow in strength particularly when when subjected to
    >> impact shocks, such as in pounding the pavement or chopping wood.
    >> That gives them better growth signals than simple muscular loading as
    >> in weight lifting. I haven't been able to find out what best helps
    >> strengthen tendons.
    >>

    >
    >Interesting... I had bad elbow tendinitis for quite a while, which I
    >blamed on DB swings with poor form, but I was also doing weighted chins at
    >the time. The tendinitis didn't go away until I gave up doing chins--maybe
    >they were the culprit.


    Try using straps/hooks for grip assistance. I think you'll find out
    that makes a difference.
     
  19. Hugh Beyer

    Hugh Beyer Guest

    JMW <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Hugh Beyer <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    >>>> fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted
    >>>> two arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3
    >>>> bodyweight strapped on.
    >>>
    >>>> However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    >>>> training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I
    >>>> can manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a
    >>>> slightly less controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of
    >>>> these negatives my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for
    >>>> about an hour after training. I seem to be getting slightly worse
    >>>> soreness in my strong arm for some reason. Is this something to worry
    >>>> about or normal. I am wary of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has
    >>>> anyone any tips for strengthening the elbow tendons.
    >>>
    >>> If my experience is any guide watch the elbow tendon soreness very
    >>> carefully. At the age of twenty, when I spent lots of time doing
    >>> strenuous rock climbing nearly every day for fun because I lived a few
    >>> hundred yards from a cliff, I became able to do a one arm pullup.
    >>>
    >>> At the age of 62, after decades of no exercise, I decided to see if I
    >>> could work my way up to doing it again. In a few months I moved from
    >>> only being able to hang twitching from a pullup bar to being able to
    >>> do one pullup. At about 4 pullups I started developing the kind
    >>> of elbow tendon soreness you describe. At 6 pullups it lasted for days
    >>> rather than hours and I was getting very excited by how fast my
    >>> strength was developing. I was adding a pullup to my max reps about
    >>> every fortnight. I regarded the soreness as simply a good sign that I
    >>> had strained things enough to boost strength growth.
    >>>
    >>> At 8 pullups the tendon soreness just didn't go away, and I discovered
    >>> I had injured my tendons and was going to have to take a break. A year
    >>> later they're a lot better but still haven't recovered. In my weakest
    >>> arm they still hurt slightly, all the time.
    >>>
    >>> My guess is that after decades of driving a desk for a living my
    >>> tendons had dropped down in strength to match my reduced arm power,
    >>> and that muscles can be grown in strength much faster than tendons.
    >>>
    >>> I'd be very interested in a method of strengthening tendons too. I
    >>> note that bones grow in strength particularly when when subjected to
    >>> impact shocks, such as in pounding the pavement or chopping wood.
    >>> That gives them better growth signals than simple muscular loading as
    >>> in weight lifting. I haven't been able to find out what best helps
    >>> strengthen tendons.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Interesting... I had bad elbow tendinitis for quite a while, which I
    >>blamed on DB swings with poor form, but I was also doing weighted chins
    >>at the time. The tendinitis didn't go away until I gave up doing
    >>chins--maybe they were the culprit.

    >
    > Try using straps/hooks for grip assistance. I think you'll find out
    > that makes a difference.
    >


    What confused me is that I could never tell what was bothering the elbow
    in the gym... it wasn't till later that I realized it was messed up. Grip
    strength never felt like a problem.

    Hugh


    --
    Exercise is a dirty word. Whenever I hear it, I wash my mouth out with
    chocolate. ("Ladi")
     
  20. JMW

    JMW Guest

    Hugh Beyer <[email protected]> wrote:

    >JMW <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Hugh Beyer <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have just started training for a 1 arm chin up. I think I have a
    >>>>> fairly good base to start this training as I've been doing weighted
    >>>>> two arm chin ups for a while and can do 1 rep with around 2/3
    >>>>> bodyweight strapped on.
    >>>>
    >>>>> However I am nowhere near doing a 1 armer at the moment. So the
    >>>>> training I'm doing consists of controlled negatives with one arm. I
    >>>>> can manage a slow controlled negative with my right arm and a
    >>>>> slightly less controlled one with my left. After doing one or two of
    >>>>> these negatives my elbow tendons are a bit sore and remain so for
    >>>>> about an hour after training. I seem to be getting slightly worse
    >>>>> soreness in my strong arm for some reason. Is this something to worry
    >>>>> about or normal. I am wary of developing elbow tendonitis. Also, has
    >>>>> anyone any tips for strengthening the elbow tendons.
    >>>>
    >>>> If my experience is any guide watch the elbow tendon soreness very
    >>>> carefully. At the age of twenty, when I spent lots of time doing
    >>>> strenuous rock climbing nearly every day for fun because I lived a few
    >>>> hundred yards from a cliff, I became able to do a one arm pullup.
    >>>>
    >>>> At the age of 62, after decades of no exercise, I decided to see if I
    >>>> could work my way up to doing it again. In a few months I moved from
    >>>> only being able to hang twitching from a pullup bar to being able to
    >>>> do one pullup. At about 4 pullups I started developing the kind
    >>>> of elbow tendon soreness you describe. At 6 pullups it lasted for days
    >>>> rather than hours and I was getting very excited by how fast my
    >>>> strength was developing. I was adding a pullup to my max reps about
    >>>> every fortnight. I regarded the soreness as simply a good sign that I
    >>>> had strained things enough to boost strength growth.
    >>>>
    >>>> At 8 pullups the tendon soreness just didn't go away, and I discovered
    >>>> I had injured my tendons and was going to have to take a break. A year
    >>>> later they're a lot better but still haven't recovered. In my weakest
    >>>> arm they still hurt slightly, all the time.
    >>>>
    >>>> My guess is that after decades of driving a desk for a living my
    >>>> tendons had dropped down in strength to match my reduced arm power,
    >>>> and that muscles can be grown in strength much faster than tendons.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'd be very interested in a method of strengthening tendons too. I
    >>>> note that bones grow in strength particularly when when subjected to
    >>>> impact shocks, such as in pounding the pavement or chopping wood.
    >>>> That gives them better growth signals than simple muscular loading as
    >>>> in weight lifting. I haven't been able to find out what best helps
    >>>> strengthen tendons.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Interesting... I had bad elbow tendinitis for quite a while, which I
    >>>blamed on DB swings with poor form, but I was also doing weighted chins
    >>>at the time. The tendinitis didn't go away until I gave up doing
    >>>chins--maybe they were the culprit.

    >>
    >> Try using straps/hooks for grip assistance. I think you'll find out
    >> that makes a difference.

    >
    >What confused me is that I could never tell what was bothering the elbow
    >in the gym... it wasn't till later that I realized it was messed up. Grip
    >strength never felt like a problem.


    Grip strength isn't really the issue.
     
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