One for Sheldon maybe: sprocket thickness, uniglide vs. hyperglide

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by maxo, Mar 30, 2005.

  1. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    Rich wrote:
    > Maggie wrote:
    >
    >> So who do we address the dumb questions (to)?

    >
    > "Little Bill" Baka
    >
    > He'll have an answer. And a story. And it'll be a good one.


    The thing is, you don't NEED to address 'em to him! He'll jump in (more
    like a cannonball) regardless. (The stories are quite funny, though, I must
    admit.)
     


  2. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:12:17 +0000, maxo wrote:

    > It all depends on the Sram sprockets
    > being the same thickness as the UG sprockets


    Sheldon indeed had a chart which I didn't find at first on his site
    listing sprocket and spacer thickness for most all post Uniglide stuff.
    Campy too. Didn't have the Uniglide widths, but I doubt many people need
    those these days anyway.

    My Sram sprockets that I used are 1.8 mm so even if the original was
    1.9--with only five spacers, I'd only be half a mm off, or a quarter on
    the top and bottom with the middle gears set right--most derailleurs can
    handle that kind of play.

    The old Uniglide sprockets are begging to be put on some improvised single
    speed hubs as the teeth are slightly bent, but straight enough to not
    encourage chain jump like the hyperglide type.
     
  3. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:12:17 +0000, maxo wrote:

    > It all depends on the Sram sprockets
    > being the same thickness as the UG sprockets


    Sheldon indeed had a chart which I didn't find at first on his site
    listing sprocket and spacer thickness for most all post Uniglide stuff.
    Campy too. Didn't have the Uniglide widths, but I doubt many people need
    those these days anyway.

    My Sram sprockets that I used are 1.8 mm so even if the original was
    1.9--with only five spacers, I'd only be half a mm off, or a quarter on
    the top and bottom with the middle gears set right--most derailleurs can
    handle that kind of play.

    The old Uniglide sprockets are begging to be put on some improvised single
    speed hubs as the teeth are slightly bent, but straight enough to not
    encourage chain jump like the hyperglide type.
     
  4. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 03:35:07 +0000, maxo wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:12:17 +0000, maxo wrote:
    >
    >> It all depends on the Sram sprockets
    >> being the same thickness as the UG sprockets

    >
    > Sheldon indeed had a chart which I didn't find at first on his site
    > listing sprocket and spacer thickness for most all post Uniglide stuff.
    > Campy too. Didn't have the Uniglide widths, but I doubt many people need
    > those these days anyway.
    >
    > My Sram sprockets that I used are 1.8 mm so even if the original was
    > 1.9--with only five spacers, I'd only be half a mm off, or a quarter on
    > the top and bottom with the middle gears set right--most derailleurs can
    > handle that kind of play.
    >
    > The old Uniglide sprockets are begging to be put on some improvised single
    > speed hubs as the teeth are slightly bent, but straight enough to not
    > encourage chain jump like the hyperglide type.


    Here it is, the rarely seen in the wild, 6-speed Sram hyperglide cassette:

    http://photos7.flickr.com/8000518_5f2eee2677_o.jpg
     
  5. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 19:49:55 -0700, Rich wrote:

    > maxo wrote:
    >
    >> Here it is, the rarely seen in the wild, 6-speed Sram hyperglide
    >> cassette:
    >>
    >> http://photos7.flickr.com/8000518_5f2eee2677_o.jpg

    >
    > Wow. That's clean. My sprockets are always black with gunk. Should I be
    > cleaning it off? And if so, how?
    >
    > Rich


    LOL, that's not even as clean as my bikes usually are. I hate dirty
    drivetrains. Grrr.

    Drivetrain cleaning is a very political thing. What most folks agree on is
    that unnecessary oil and grease on exposed bits attracts dirt.

    I take my bikes out to the back deck and use Simple Green brand detergent
    as a solvent. It's fairly green and biodegradable which is a nice thing.

    I use a diluted mixture of it on most parts, but on the drivetrain, chain,
    cranks, and cassette, I do full strength with a toothbrush--it's an
    excellent degreaser. Then I rinse thoroughly with a hose and my thumb,
    avoiding high pressure on sensitive bits like the BB. Then I lube the
    chain with my preference of dry lube (I use Super Lube, as I got a bunch
    of cans for cheap, it's pretty much a tri-flow type thing, teflon in
    suspension). I lube all pivot points, and the chain--the chain quite
    liberally. Crank the cranks a few times to get it "in there", then scrub
    the chain dry with a rag. The lube's on the inside where it needs to be.
    With all "dry lubes" such as the ones mentioned, you need to wait an hour
    or so for the suspension agent to dissipate before riding--not critical
    really, but I find it helps.

    Takes me only about half an hour for two bikes. Once per week--it's like
    flossing--eventually you get into it. :p
     
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