One hand set up?



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Dave

Guest
Due to an accident I can't use my right hand. I've been riding fixed for a while but now want to
built up a geared road bike.

My plan is to use Profile Airwing bars with one bar end shifter and one Campag Ergo lever with both
brakes operated by the same lever.

Problem is that the left hand lever operates the front mech. It would be much more convenient for me
if it worked the rear.

Alternatively, I could fit tri bars and use two bar end shifters or something like those old
GripShift things designed for road bikes.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks Dave
 
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Philip Taylor -

Guest
Dave wrote:
>
> Due to an accident I can't use my right hand. I've been riding fixed for a while but now want to
> built up a geared road bike.
>
> My plan is to use Profile Airwing bars with one bar end shifter and one Campag Ergo lever with
> both brakes operated by the same lever.
>
> Problem is that the left hand lever operates the front mech. It would be much more convenient for
> me if it worked the rear.
>
> Alternatively, I could fit tri bars and use two bar end shifters or something like those old
> GripShift things designed for road bikes.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions?

I would have thought that braking would be far more of an issue than gear changing, and that having
two brakes operated from a single lever could be a real hazard in an emergency. Using derailleur
gears, I can't see how you could also use a back- pedal brake, but I understand there are now
multi-ratio
(e.g., ten ratios) epicyclic gears, some of which /might/ have back-pedal-breaking functionality.
Does this seem an option, or are you absolutely committed to derailler gears ?

Philip Taylor
 
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David Nutter

Guest
Dave <[email protected]> said:

> Problem is that the left hand lever operates the front mech. It would be much more convenient for
> me if it worked the rear.
>
> Alternatively, I could fit tri bars and use two bar end shifters or something like those old
> GripShift things designed for road bikes.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions?

This may seem an odd suggestion but what about downtube or (better yet) stem-mounted shifters? You
can easily operate them both with one hand, assuming you can manage to bend down without another
hand to support your weight.

Regards,

-david
 
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Peter Clinch

Guest
Dave wrote:
> Due to an accident I can't use my right hand. I've been riding fixed for a while but now want to
> built up a geared road bike.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions?

You could do your gearing via a Schlumpf Mountain/Speed/Super Speed drive rather than a double
chainring (or probably in place of a triple as the range change is much bigger). You operate these
by tapping the button in the middle of the crank with your heel, so hands aren't required. You'd
need a little float on a clipless pedal to use one, but I think it should work.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
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Jim Price

Guest
Dave wrote:
> Due to an accident I can't use my right hand. I've been riding fixed for a while but now want to
> built up a geared road bike.
>
> My plan is to use Profile Airwing bars with one bar end shifter and one Campag Ergo lever with
> both brakes operated by the same lever.
>
> Problem is that the left hand lever operates the front mech. It would be much more convenient for
> me if it worked the rear.
>
> Alternatively, I could fit tri bars and use two bar end shifters or something like those old
> GripShift things designed for road bikes.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions?

If you were going to consider Shimano mountain bike components, some people have suggested that the
action of the latest XTR levers is "back to front" to the extent that Specialised have used on some
models a rear derailleur which reverses the gear changing order. This may make it a potential
lever/shifter to use for the rear derailleur on the left hand side. This may work with Profile
Airwing style bars, if the bar diameter is not too big. You would need to implement the two into one
brake cable adapter externally.

Jim Price
 
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Michael Macclan

Guest
In message <[email protected]>, "Philip TAYLOR [PC87S-O/XP]"
<[email protected]> writes
>I would have thought that braking would be far more of an issue than gear changing, and that having
>two brakes operated from a single lever could be a real hazard in an emergency.

I've heard that this is quite a common arrangement.
--
Michael MacClancy
 
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James Hodson

Guest
On Tue, 3 Jun 2003 16:19:01 +0100, "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Does anyone have any suggestions?
>

Campag Ergo for rear mech and down tube lever for front mech? I don't know if this is at all
possible as I don't know the specs of the US levers?

Would not left sided Ergos for the US operate the rear mechs? I think t'was Sheldon "I brake
correctly" Brown who wrote an article on the evils and perils of front wheel versus rear
wheel braking.

Whatever, from <http://www.campagnolo.com/branch.php> I see

CAMPAGNOLO USA INC. 2105-L Camino Vida Roble - Carlsbad CA 92009 U.S.A. Phone: +1-760-9310106 Fax:
+1-760-9310991

James

--
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/c.butty/Dscf0632.jpg
 
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Pete Biggs

Guest
Dave wrote:
> Due to an accident I can't use my right hand. I've been riding fixed for a while but now want to
> built up a geared road bike.
>
> My plan is to use Profile Airwing bars with one bar end shifter and one Campag Ergo lever with
> both brakes operated by the same lever.
>
> Problem is that the left hand lever operates the front mech. It would be much more convenient for
> me if it worked the rear.

I'm going to try an experiment for you - as I'll soon be removing my Ergos to service anyway
(probably next Monday). I'll try wiring the left Ergo to the rear derailleur. Perhaps some
custom-spaced cassette could be used or alternative cable anchoring, even using two clicks per shift
if necessary. I've got a feeling /some/ solution could be worked out with them.

What is the minimum number of rear sprockets that you would be prepared to use?

Alternatively, what about getting some parts made especially for the Ergo? Might cost a fortune but
then so do new top-end Ergos!

A very crude solution for Ergos would be to use worn-out ratchet springs. There would then be no
clicks and levers would act like friction levers (as I have discovered myself). Trouble is, there's
a danger of slippage because of insufficient friction.

What about old-style thumb shifters? Perhaps one/they could be fitted to some kind of mini handlebar
extension.

~PB
 
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Pete Biggs

Guest
Philip TAYLOR [PC87S-O/XP] wrote:
> I would have thought that braking would be far more of an issue than gear changing, and that
> having two brakes operated from a single lever could be a real hazard in an emergency.

Just a front brake may be enough to suffice, or rear could be deliberately made less powerful
somehow so wouldn't hinder too much in ermergencies.

~PB
 
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Dave

Guest
> I would have thought that braking would be far more of an issue than gear changing, and that
> having two brakes operated from a single lever could be a real hazard in an emergency.

Braking is an issue that I've wrestled with for the last ten years. The fixie that I ride at the
moment is road legal but on a steep descent I would feel safer on a decent with a freewheel.

> derailleur gears, I can't see how you could also use a back- pedal brake,

Hub gears are not an option on this bike but thanks for the suggestions.

Regards Dave
 
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Dave

Guest
> This may seem an odd suggestion but what about downtube or (better yet) stem-mounted shifters? You
> can easily operate them both with one hand,

Good suggestion but most oversized alluminium frames don't appear to have the neccesary braze-ons
and I'm not sure the old stem mounted lever would fit with the Aheadsets. I'll look into it though.

Thanks Dave.
 
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Dave

Guest
> You could do your gearing via a Schlumpf Mountain/Speed/Super Speed

Thanks for the suggestion but I'm planning to build a race bike and the Schlumpf is too heavy.

Cheers Dave
 
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Dave

Guest
> I'm going to try an experiment for you

You are a top bloke Mr Biggs

> What is the minimum number of rear sprockets that you would be prepared to
use?

It would have to be 9 or 10 I'm afraid.

> Alternatively, what about getting some parts made especially for the Ergo? Might cost a fortune
> but then so do new top-end Ergos!

Ouch!

> A very crude solution for Ergos would be to use worn-out ratchet springs. There would then be no
> clicks and levers would act like friction levers
(as I have discovered myself). Trouble is, there's a danger of slippage because of
insufficient friction.

Exactly, you've answered your own question.

> What about old-style thumb shifters? Perhaps one/they could be fitted to
some kind of mini handlebar extension.

I'm looking into it. Many thanks Dave
 
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Mads Hilberg

Guest
> Thanks for the suggestion but I'm planning to build a race bike and the Schlumpf is too heavy.

Have you considered a WindCheetah? It would seem to be ideal for someone in your situation. Of
course this means joining the dark side...

Mads
 
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Pete Biggs

Guest
Dave wrote:
>> This may seem an odd suggestion but what about downtube or (better yet) stem-mounted shifters?
>> You can easily operate them both with one hand,
>
> Good suggestion but most oversized alluminium frames don't appear to have the neccesary braze-ons

Clip-on levers or levers with a clip-on adaptor could be used. For example, old Shimano 105 d/t
levers comprised an adaptor (including "dummy" braze-ons) and ordinary-style levers. But I'm not
sure if they'd fit a modern oversized downtube - but I would imagine some kind of bracket could be
made especially instead.

~PB
 
D

Dave

Guest
> Have you considered a WindCheetah? It would seem to be ideal for someone
in
> your situation. Of course this means joining the dark side...
>

Funnily enough I did consider a Windcheetah way back when I messed up my arm. But luckily I saw
the light.
:)

D.
 
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Mads Hilberg

Guest
> Funnily enough I did consider a Windcheetah way back when I messed up my arm. But luckily I saw
> the light.
> :)

...or not - depending on your point of view. What made you decide against it?

Mads
 
S

Sabineuk

Guest
Michael MacClancy [email protected] said:

>>I would have thought that braking would be far more of an issue than gear changing, and that
>>having two brakes operated from a single lever could be a real hazard in an emergency.
>
>I've heard that this is quite a common arrangement.

It used to be a common arrangement on tandems: it's a bloody menace as you can't set the brakes up
to both work properly.

As James Hodson said, I think Sheldon Brown has an article on it:
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tandem-brakes.html and scroll down to Control Setup.

Given that the front brake is the primary, do you want the ability to brake both wheels at once in
normal riding, or do you just want a rear brake to keep you legal and in case the front fails?

Personally, I'd aim for the latter and run a normal rear brake from either a lever on tri-bars, or
perhaps from a mountain bike lever on the tops (need to watch the cable pull though). If you want to
be able to brake both at once, maybe run the rear from a gear shifter (bar-end?) so you can use it
as a drag brake while controlling the front directly? This might work better if you could use a
tandem hub with drum brake.

As for the gears, my inclination would be to go for bar-ends in tri bars, or for one of the adaptors
to allow you to mount D/T shifters at the end of tri bars (can't remember brands, sorry). That way,
both shifters are close to each other. If you're racing, I'm sceptical about running a front Ergo
with a rear bar-end.

I know you said hub gears weren't an option, but have you looked seriously at something like the
Rohloff? Weight and cost I guess ...

Good luck anyway ...

John
 
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