One Nomad's Tale

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by bentcruiser, May 3, 2003.

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  1. bentcruiser

    bentcruiser New Member

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    With Uncle Sam paying me for overplaying, I indulged in a cargo trailer. It is a Burley Nomad. I am quite impressed with the design inside and out. It seems to be much more efficient than a BOB that I have used for several hundred miles.

    The setup was a snap. The alternative hitch seems really innovative and is a lot easier than the BOB that I used. The Burley folds flat for storage too. According to a scale, the Burley is lighter than the BOB that I borrowed (which was one of the newer ones).

    Weight Test:

    First order of business was to test it after setting it up. But with what? I did not have my touring gear gathered for a tour. What do I have? Well, one hair-brained idea later and my basset hound and I were going for a spin. The trailer did not even hardly get noticed by me. I had no real clue that I was towing a 67lb dog. I had a good average of 14mph.

    Endurance:

    My endurance test was a commuting trip that takes me down some pot holed and bombed out roads and alleys. I purposely took it through chug holes. It was unbelievable. With the BOB I was used to feeling like the trailer was laying on its side after a hole. I hardly knew the Nomad had been through a hole. The lack of tongue weight is a significant success. I had no trouble on hills (up or down). It was simply a great ride.

    I just wanted to share what I am sure is a mundane story but I couldn't be more thrilled.

    Derek
     
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  2. Rob Rudeski

    Rob Rudeski Guest

    "bentcruiser" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    >Well, one hair-brained idea later and my basset hound and I were going for a spin. With the BOB I
    >was used to feeling like the trailer was laying on its side after a hole. I hardly knew the Nomad
    >had been through a hole.

    I'll bet the dog knew. ;-)

    > The lack of tongue weight is a significant success. I had no trouble on hills (up or down). It was
    > simply a great ride.

    I don't think the dog would agree. ;-)
     
  3. Adelphia.Net

    Adelphia.Net Guest

    I was impressed with the testing methods for your new trailer. I have just ordered an InSTEP Ride N'
    Stride 20 for just this purpose. I want to start riding again after a few years hiatus and don't
    have any one to watch my Bassett while I go for extended rides. That's right, I have ordered a
    trailer for my dog! Hope my experience is as successful as yours.

    "bentcruiser" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > With Uncle Sam paying me for overplaying, I indulged in a cargo trailer. It is a Burley Nomad. I
    > am quite impressed with the design inside and out. It seems to be much more efficient than a BOB
    > that I have used for several hundred miles.
    >
    > The setup was a snap. The alternative hitch seems really innovative and is a lot easier than the
    > BOB that I used. The Burley folds flat for storage too. According to a scale, the Burley is
    > lighter than the BOB that I borrowed (which was one of the newer ones).
    >
    > Weight Test:
    >
    > First order of business was to test it after setting it up. But with what? I did not have my
    > touring gear gathered for a tour. What do I have? Well, one hair-brained idea later and my basset
    > hound and I were going for a spin. The trailer did not even hardly get noticed by
    > me. I had no real clue that I was towing a 67lb dog. I had a good average of 14mph.
    >
    > Endurance:
    >
    > My endurance test was a commuting trip that takes me down some pot holed and bombed out roads and
    > alleys. I purposely took it through chug holes. It was unbelievable. With the BOB I was used to
    > feeling like the trailer was laying on its side after a hole. I hardly knew the Nomad had been
    > through a hole. The lack of tongue weight is a significant success. I had no trouble on hills (up
    > or down). It was simply a great ride.
    >
    > I just wanted to share what I am sure is a mundane story but I couldn't be more thrilled.
    >
    > Derek
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  4. Jerry Rhodes

    Jerry Rhodes Guest

    bentcruiser <[email protected]> wrote :
    >I just wanted to share what I am sure is a mundane story but I
    couldn't
    >be more thrilled.

    Great "pirep".

    I used to use an early cannondale trailer with 26" wheels. It had a flat plastic thing that attached
    to the seat post. I used it on my Motobecane Grand Record. I still have the trailer but the plastic
    thing snapped.

    Other than the loaded weight, I hardly noticed it. One day I took home 500 ft of Romex wire, 50 lb
    of dog food, a sack of Portland cement, 4 gallons of paint and some odds and ends. Stopping was an
    adventure. I had about 240# + the trailer.

    The insructions said to load with a slight negative tongue weight. Seemed odd to me but it worked.

    Jerry
     
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