One-Third the Man

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Pat, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. Pat

    Pat Guest

    http://tinyurl.com/pw3rd

    Men's Health

    NAME: Joseph Huber

    HOME: Milwaukee, WI

    AGE: 33

    HEIGHT: 6'2"

    WEIGHT: 197 lb

    OCCUPATION: Machine operator

    BEFORE: 547 LB

    AFTER: 197 LB

    THE GAIN: Following a nasty divorce 10 years ago, Huber hit the comfort
    food—hard—and ballooned from his high-school weight of 260 pounds.

    A typical Monday Night Football feast consisted of a large pizza, two
    2-liter bottles of soda, garlic bread, jalapeno poppers, two beef
    sandwiches, chips and beer. "I never felt full," he says. Huber's weight
    steadily increased to 547 pounds.

    THE CHANGE: Climbing a creaky set of porch stairs took Huber a harrowing 15
    minutes. "I was afraid the stairs were going to fall off the building," he
    says. "I realized then that if I didn't lose some weight, I would die."
    Huber opted for gastric bypass surgery in December 2003, which limited his
    stomach to 6 ounces of food at a time.

    THE LIFESTYLE: The surgery was just the start. Huber still weighed 450
    pounds when he started to ride his bike seven miles to work. "The first
    time, it took me an hour and a half," he says. Huber was soon biking or
    running to work every day, and he started lifting weights. His stomach has
    since stretched to fit a normal-size meal, but Huber's eating habits
    haven't regressed: He avoids anything high in fat or sugar, and fuels
    workouts with protein shakes and tuna sandwiches.

    THE REWARD: Last year, Huber placed 26th out of 472 participants in his
    first triathlon. His 2006 race schedule is already packed. "I'm at a place
    I really like," Huber says. "Eating healthy and exercising are second
    nature."

    JOE'S TIPS

    The shortcut only takes you so far. "The surgery got me in the right
    mind-set, but I still had to exercise and eat right to get fit. That's what
    really made the difference."

    Live the diet. "A diet is something you do to lose weight, and then you go
    back to how you used to eat. Healthy eating has to become your norm."

    Take baby steps. "I was afraid to push myself in exercise. But if you do it
    once, it's not as hard the next time. The more you work at it, the easier
    things become for you."
     
    Tags:


  2. At 450 lbs, having a hard time climbing a set of stairs, he STARTED by
    biking 7 miles to work? every day?

    He's got a heart f Iron..
    Will~

    "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > http://tinyurl.com/pw3rd
    >
    > Men's Health
    >
    > NAME: Joseph Huber
    >
    > HOME: Milwaukee, WI
    >
    > AGE: 33
    >
    > HEIGHT: 6'2"
    >
    > WEIGHT: 197 lb
    >
    > OCCUPATION: Machine operator
    >
    > BEFORE: 547 LB
    >
    > AFTER: 197 LB
    >
    > THE GAIN: Following a nasty divorce 10 years ago, Huber hit the comfort
    > food-hard-and ballooned from his high-school weight of 260 pounds.
    >
    > A typical Monday Night Football feast consisted of a large pizza, two
    > 2-liter bottles of soda, garlic bread, jalapeno poppers, two beef
    > sandwiches, chips and beer. "I never felt full," he says. Huber's weight
    > steadily increased to 547 pounds.
    >
    > THE CHANGE: Climbing a creaky set of porch stairs took Huber a harrowing
    > 15
    > minutes. "I was afraid the stairs were going to fall off the building," he
    > says. "I realized then that if I didn't lose some weight, I would die."
    > Huber opted for gastric bypass surgery in December 2003, which limited his
    > stomach to 6 ounces of food at a time.
    >
    > THE LIFESTYLE: The surgery was just the start. Huber still weighed 450
    > pounds when he started to ride his bike seven miles to work. "The first
    > time, it took me an hour and a half," he says. Huber was soon biking or
    > running to work every day, and he started lifting weights. His stomach has
    > since stretched to fit a normal-size meal, but Huber's eating habits
    > haven't regressed: He avoids anything high in fat or sugar, and fuels
    > workouts with protein shakes and tuna sandwiches.
    >
    > THE REWARD: Last year, Huber placed 26th out of 472 participants in his
    > first triathlon. His 2006 race schedule is already packed. "I'm at a place
    > I really like," Huber says. "Eating healthy and exercising are second
    > nature."
    >
    > JOE'S TIPS
    >
    > The shortcut only takes you so far. "The surgery got me in the right
    > mind-set, but I still had to exercise and eat right to get fit. That's
    > what
    > really made the difference."
    >
    > Live the diet. "A diet is something you do to lose weight, and then you go
    > back to how you used to eat. Healthy eating has to become your norm."
    >
    > Take baby steps. "I was afraid to push myself in exercise. But if you do
    > it
    > once, it's not as hard the next time. The more you work at it, the easier
    > things become for you."
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest


    > At 450 lbs, having a hard time climbing a set of stairs, he STARTED by
    > biking 7 miles to work? every day?
    >
    > He's got a heart f Iron..
    > Will~


    I'd like to know the brand and model of the bike that would support his 450
    pounds.

    Pat in TX
     
  4. Max Penn

    Max Penn Guest

    "Pat in TX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > > At 450 lbs, having a hard time climbing a set of stairs, he STARTED by
    > > biking 7 miles to work? every day?
    > >
    > > He's got a heart f Iron..
    > > Will~

    >
    > I'd like to know the brand and model of the bike that would support his

    450
    > pounds.
    >
    > Pat in TX
    >
    >

    Pat, There are some bikes that will support that weight. Worksman, a
    company that has been making bikes in New York for over one hundred years,
    builds bikes that are practically indestructible. I'm over 300 and I have
    had no problem with any bike, though I've never tried one of the ultra-light
    frames. I'm careful not to ride over curbs or on stairs so as not to
    overstress the frame. Touring bikes are also built to carry lots of extra
    stuff, so if a rider carries only his ample frame on the bike, it's not
    likely to overstress it. On any bike, the chain and the gears and the
    brakes all work harder for a heavier load, so a large rider should have good
    ones and inspect and replace them as needed.

    My hat's off to a guy who can start by riding fourteen miles per day at that
    weight. Bicycling is a good, low impact exercise. I find that and swimming
    are the two most agreeable forms of activity for me.

    Max
     
  5. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Pat in TX wrote:
    ::: At 450 lbs, having a hard time climbing a set of stairs, he STARTED
    ::: by biking 7 miles to work? every day?
    :::
    ::: He's got a heart f Iron..
    ::: Will~
    ::
    :: I'd like to know the brand and model of the bike that would support
    :: his 450 pounds.
    ::

    There was an article in Buycycling a few months back (well, in 2005) that
    discussed something similar to this situation. They even had pictures of
    the guy on his bike.
     
  6. Phil Abel

    Phil Abel Guest

    "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > http://tinyurl.com/pw3rd
    >
    > Men's Health
    >
    > NAME: Joseph Huber
    >
    > HOME: Milwaukee, WI
    >
    > AGE: 33
    >
    > HEIGHT: 6'2"
    >
    > WEIGHT: 197 lb
    >
    > OCCUPATION: Machine operator
    >
    > BEFORE: 547 LB
    >
    > AFTER: 197 LB


    Fantastic effort and great story. Well done Joseph !!
     
  7. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest


    > ::
    > :: I'd like to know the brand and model of the bike that would support
    > :: his 450 pounds.
    > ::
    >
    > There was an article in Buycycling a few months back (well, in 2005) that
    > discussed something similar to this situation. They even had pictures of
    > the guy on his bike.
    >

    What I got out of the article was that the guy already had this bike lying
    around the house. That means that he bought it before he weighed 450 pounds.
    Now, if he bought it years ago, he didn't search out a bike that would
    support a body weight of 450 pounds. He just apparently lucked out with the
    old bike he happened to have.

    Pat in TX
    >
     
  8. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Pat in TX wrote:
    ::::: I'd like to know the brand and model of the bike that would
    ::::: support his 450 pounds.
    :::::
    :::
    ::: There was an article in Buycycling a few months back (well, in
    ::: 2005) that discussed something similar to this situation. They
    ::: even had pictures of the guy on his bike.
    :::
    :: What I got out of the article was that the guy already had this bike
    :: lying around the house. That means that he bought it before he
    :: weighed 450 pounds. Now, if he bought it years ago, he didn't search
    :: out a bike that would support a body weight of 450 pounds. He just
    :: apparently lucked out with the old bike he happened to have.

    That could very well be. I just saw only the part I responded to in my
    newsreader, and it sounds very similar to that story in Bicycle mag.

    ::
    :: Pat in TX
     
  9. Kelvin Jones

    Kelvin Jones Guest

    I don't know...this is cool, but I don't feel as inspired by the weight
    loss knowing that he has had gastric bypass surgery. I know that at his
    weight level it was probably medically necessary, but I also know that
    it makes it really easy to lose weight. Here is a quote from someone's
    extensive diary after going through gastric bypass surgery:
    "It's strange that I eat all I want and still lose weight, but I feel
    like I've traded an inability to lose weight for an inability to stop
    losing weight." - from http://www.basilwhite.com/gastric/

    What I find more inspiring is that he was able to start working out and
    *pushing himself* after being dormant for so long.

    Just my feelings...
     
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