Online weight training guides for triathletes

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Spm073, Mar 22, 2003.

  1. Spm073

    Spm073 Guest

    Im working on revamping my weight training and was wondering if anyone had any tips on online
    weighttraining guides for triathletes.
     
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  2. Spm073 wrote:
    >
    > Im working on revamping my weight training and was wondering if anyone had any tips on online
    > weighttraining guides for triathletes.

    The subject is too broad and the range of opinions too diverse to have any single set of guidelines.
    Generally speaking, you might start your thinking off by deciding if you wish a general strength
    routine - on the theory that doing a little lifting will make your stronger overall and perhaps
    being stronger overall is what you need to race faster and be more free from injury - or whether you
    wish to design a progrm that specifically targets muscles that will be used in one or more of
    triathlon's sports.

    For me, someone who has a bad back and a history of injuries, I prefer the general approach. I
    find I get all the sport-specific practice I want, need, and have time for by practicing the
    sport itself.

    Once you've chosen a direction, you then have to decide whether you want to work for an increase in
    absolute strength, an increase in muscle size, increased muscular endurance, or some combination of
    these things. Lots of people in endurance sports find working towards a combination of strength and
    size in the off-season is a good thing - they put on a little muscle and get a little stronger over
    the winter and make good use of their increases during the season.

    My personal prefence is to work for a combined strength/endurance. I use kettlebells for this for
    the most part and have been very happy with the results. My web site, http://www.kbnj.com, has
    more information about them. I posted recently in greater detail about my own background and
    about kettlebells here. I do workouts like swinging a 50 lb. kettlebell over my head and back
    down again (called a one-armed snatch) for 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off for 20 minutes. 50 lbs.
    isn't a lot by the standards of the iron game but it's more than nothing and more than most folks
    can do. The movement involves your entire body - nothing is left out. Strength/endurance is a
    cool thing, says me.

    Hope that's of some help to you.

    -S-
    --
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  3. Conflict of interest here? Methinks you're trying to push your balls.

    Harry

    Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Spm073 wrote:
    > >
    > > Im working on revamping my weight training and was wondering if anyone had any tips on online
    > > weighttraining guides for triathletes.
    >
    > The subject is too broad and the range of opinions too diverse to have any single set of
    > guidelines. Generally speaking, you might start your thinking off by deciding if you wish a
    > general strength routine - on the theory that doing a little lifting will make your stronger
    > overall and perhaps being stronger overall is what you need to race faster and be more free from
    > injury - or whether you wish to design a progrm that specifically targets muscles that will be
    > used in one or more of triathlon's sports.
    >
    > For me, someone who has a bad back and a history of injuries, I prefer the general approach. I
    > find I get all the sport-specific practice I want, need, and have time for by practicing the
    > sport itself.
    >
    > Once you've chosen a direction, you then have to decide whether you want to work for an increase
    > in absolute strength, an increase in muscle size, increased muscular endurance, or some
    > combination of these things. Lots of people in endurance sports find working towards a combination
    > of strength and size in the off-season is a good thing - they put on a little muscle and get a
    > little stronger over the winter and make good use of their increases during the season.
    >
    > My personal prefence is to work for a combined strength/endurance. I use kettlebells for this for
    > the most part and have been very happy with the results. My web site, http://www.kbnj.com, has
    > more information about them. I posted recently in greater detail about my own background and
    > about kettlebells here. I do workouts like swinging a 50 lb. kettlebell over my head and back
    > down again (called a one-armed snatch) for 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off for 20 minutes. 50 lbs.
    > isn't a lot by the standards of the iron game but it's more than nothing and more than most folks
    > can do. The movement involves your entire body - nothing is left out. Strength/endurance is a
    > cool thing, says me.
    >
    > Hope that's of some help to you.
    >
    > -S-
     
  4. Tom G

    Tom G Guest

    my sentiments exactly.

    Tom

    "Dr. Harry Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Conflict of interest here? Methinks you're trying to push your balls.
    >
    > Harry
    >
    > Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Spm073 wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Im working on revamping my weight training and was wondering if anyone
    had any
    > > > tips on online weighttraining guides for triathletes.
    > >
    > > The subject is too broad and the range of opinions too diverse to have any single set of
    > > guidelines. Generally speaking, you might start your thinking off by deciding if you wish a
    > > general strength routine - on the theory that doing a little lifting will make your stronger
    > > overall and perhaps being stronger overall is what you need to race faster and be more free from
    > > injury - or whether you wish to design a progrm that specifically targets muscles that will be
    > > used in one or more of triathlon's sports.
    > >
    > > For me, someone who has a bad back and a history of injuries, I prefer the general approach. I
    > > find I get all the sport-specific practice I want, need, and have time for by practicing the
    > > sport itself.
    > >
    > > Once you've chosen a direction, you then have to decide whether you want to work for an increase
    > > in absolute strength, an increase in muscle size, increased muscular endurance, or some
    > > combination of these things. Lots of people in endurance sports find working towards a
    > > combination of strength and size in the off-season is a good thing - they put on a little muscle
    > > and get a little stronger over the winter and make good use of their increases during the
    > > season.
    > >
    > > My personal prefence is to work for a combined strength/endurance. I use kettlebells for this
    > > for the most part and have been very happy with the results. My web site, http://www.kbnj.com,
    > > has more information about them. I posted recently in greater detail about my own background and
    > > about kettlebells here. I do workouts like swinging a 50 lb. kettlebell over my head and back
    > > down again (called a one-armed snatch) for 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off for 20 minutes. 50 lbs.
    > > isn't a lot by the standards of the iron game but it's more than nothing and more than most
    > > folks can do. The movement involves your entire body - nothing is left out. Strength/endurance
    > > is a cool thing, says me.
    > >
    > > Hope that's of some help to you.
    > >
    > > -S-
     
  5. Gordo Byrn

    Gordo Byrn Guest

  6. "Dr. Harry Johnson" wrote:
    >
    > Conflict of interest here? Methinks you're trying to push your balls.

    I have made my opinions clear; no conflict of interest I'm aware of. I use kettlebells and I do make
    a commission if someone buys them from my web site. I do not post that fact in every message but, if
    you look at my recent posting to this newsgroup and others when kettlebells have come up, you will
    see this "disclaimer" in almost every message.

    My apology for not including it here. I will endeavor to include it in every message in the future.

    If anyone wishes to see exactly what the commission structure for selling Dragon Door kettlebells
    is, this information is freely available on the Dragon Door web site under the "Affiliate Program"
    link. For kettlebells, if memory serves, it's about 15%, and I think it's 30% or so for books and
    videos. Here's a direct link to that page: http://www.dragondoor.com/finalaffiliates.html.

    I do not sell kettlebells for a living nor am I a fitness professional although I am seriously
    considering becoming one in the near future. I enjoy helping others, I have trained many of my
    friends and answered many private emails on the subject of training with kettlebells for no cost
    whatsoever. The commissions I received from the sale of kettlebells and related materials pay for
    things like the hosting of the web site and, as of this writing, a little more. One could endlessly
    argue precisely how much money I make from these commissions and what I use that money for - I hope
    we won't do that here.

    Please see the following thread on this newsgroup for more information:

    AD: http://www.kbnj.com, Kettlebell Beginners' Web Site

    That message was posted a week or so before this one. As I mentioned in that message, I visit this
    newsgroup infrequently but am a regular on misc.fitness.weights and a former regular on rec.running.

    -S-
    --
    http://www.kbnj.com

    > Harry
    >
    > Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Spm073 wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Im working on revamping my weight training and was wondering if anyone had any tips on online
    > > > weighttraining guides for triathletes.
    > >
    > > The subject is too broad and the range of opinions too diverse to have any single set of
    > > guidelines. Generally speaking, you might start your thinking off by deciding if you wish a
    > > general strength routine - on the theory that doing a little lifting will make your stronger
    > > overall and perhaps being stronger overall is what you need to race faster and be more free from
    > > injury - or whether you wish to design a progrm that specifically targets muscles that will be
    > > used in one or more of triathlon's sports.
    > >
    > > For me, someone who has a bad back and a history of injuries, I prefer the general approach. I
    > > find I get all the sport-specific practice I want, need, and have time for by practicing the
    > > sport itself.
    > >
    > > Once you've chosen a direction, you then have to decide whether you want to work for an increase
    > > in absolute strength, an increase in muscle size, increased muscular endurance, or some
    > > combination of these things. Lots of people in endurance sports find working towards a
    > > combination of strength and size in the off-season is a good thing - they put on a little muscle
    > > and get a little stronger over the winter and make good use of their increases during the
    > > season.
    > >
    > > My personal prefence is to work for a combined strength/endurance. I use kettlebells for this
    > > for the most part and have been very happy with the results. My web site, http://www.kbnj.com,
    > > has more information about them. I posted recently in greater detail about my own background and
    > > about kettlebells here. I do workouts like swinging a 50 lb. kettlebell over my head and back
    > > down again (called a one-armed snatch) for 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off for 20 minutes. 50 lbs.
    > > isn't a lot by the standards of the iron game but it's more than nothing and more than most
    > > folks can do. The movement involves your entire body - nothing is left out. Strength/endurance
    > > is a cool thing, says me.
    > >
    > > Hope that's of some help to you.
    > >
    > > -S-
     
  7. Tribro3

    Tribro3 Guest

    Here are some articles I've found around the web dealing with weight training and core strength as
    it relates to triathletes and training.

    http://www.trifuel.com/articles/index.php?PID=8

    Also, check out Mark Allen and Julie Moss' book "workouts for working people". There is a
    weight training section in the book which covers different specific exercises and how much and
    often to lift.

    hope these sources help. -tribro
     
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