Operation Fruitcake

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Damsel in dis Dress, Dec 10, 2005.

  1. I just put the last of the mini-fruitcakes into the oven. I decided
    to bake the whole batch in muffin form. The recipe calls for brown
    paper lining for the pans and I have no brown paper. I do have
    cupcake liners, however. So there you have it.

    The first 30 cakes weren't packed into the cups. It's been way too
    long since I make them last. I filled them to the top, then went back
    to the computer (no ink in the printer) and found out I should have
    filled them only 2/3 full. So I removed the top third and baked them.
    Poured rum over them when they came out of the oven. Lots of rum. I
    had to tip the pans to pour the excess off the tops, then lift the
    cakes out of the pans so they could sit on a towel and dry out a bit.
    There was stil rum standing in the emptied pans. Sheesh!

    Over half of the batter remained. I made 18 tightly packed cakes,
    full to the top (I hope they don't do something weird because of
    that). I plan on measuring out a tablespoon of rum for each cake this
    time. Not to worry ... they'll get more in the morning.

    Tomorrow, I'll decorate the cakes. You cut cherries in half and glue
    them to the top of the cakes with corn syrup. On larger cakes, you
    can make beautiful patterns with pecan halves, candied cherries, and
    pineapple. I'll make some examples on a plate tomorrow and take
    photos to add to the fruitcake album on my Yahoo photo site (link in
    sig).

    In the meantime, I have posted pictures of what I've done so far, if
    anyone's interested. And here's the recipe:

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Fruitcake

    Recipe By :Damsel
    Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : cakes

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    ----BATTER----
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup butter
    1/8 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/4 teaspoon mace
    1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
    1/4 teaspoon cardamom
    6 large eggs
    2 teaspoons lemon extract
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    2 teaspoons sherry
    2 1/2 cups flour
    ----FRUIT MIXTURE----
    1/2 pound candied cherries
    1 pound golden raisins
    1/2 pound seedless raisins
    1/2 pound currants
    1/2 pound chopped pecans
    1 pound mixed fruitcake fruit
    flour -- to coat fruit

    In a large bowl, combine batter ingredients in the order given,
    beating in one egg at a time. In a huge bowl, combine fruits and nuts.
    Add enough flour to the fruit mixture to coat lightly. Pour batter
    over fruit mixture; combine well.

    Line baking pans with at least two layers of heavy brown paper, such
    as postal wrapping paper, or grocery bags. (Instructions at end of
    post, if needed) Spoon batter into pans, filling no more than 2/3
    full.. Place shallow pan of water in bottom of 300 degree oven and
    bake cakes until toothpick inserted into center of cake comes out
    clean (1-1/2 hours for 1 pound cake, 2-1/2 to 3 hours for larger
    cakes) Remove from oven and pour rum over cakes while still hot. When
    cooled just enough to handle, remove paper from cakes and cool on a
    wire rack.

    When thoroughly cooled, saturate with more rum (optional). Decorate
    tops with candied fruits, attached to cake with corn syrup.
    Examples:
    *One-half red cherry in center, with thin wedge-shaped slices of green
    pineapple on each side (rectangular cakes)
    *One-half green cherry in center, with thin wedge-shaped slices of
    yellow pineapple on each side (rectangular cakes)
    *Pecan half in center, with pineapple on each end (rectangular cakes)
    *One-half cherry with thin wedge-shaped slices of pineapple forming a
    starburst around cherry center (round cakes)

    Wrap neatly with plastic wrap, using tape to secure wrap at the bottom
    of each loaf.

    Baking containers:
    *Any size loaf pan. I like to make tiny, individual-sized cakes for
    gift-giving.
    *Short coffee or sweet potato (yam) cans.

    Lining baking pans:
    *Cut paper to size. Be sure to allow enough to cover bottom of pan,
    and up the sides.
    *Mark the paper (on the side that will be away from the cake) to the
    size and shape of the pan bottom.
    *For a rectangular pan, cut the paper from the outside corner to the
    marked corner, and stop there. Do this with all four corners. Place
    paper into pan, covering bottoms and sides of pan, and wrap excess
    paper around corners, inside the pan.
    *For a round pan, follow the same procedure, but cut the paper from
    the outside edges to the marked base of pan, cutting several times, in
    a starburst-type pattern.

    Source:
    "Pat and Carol Zastera"
    Yield:
    "4 1/2 pounds"

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
    Tags:


  2. On Sat 10 Dec 2005 11:07:52p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Damsel in
    dis Dress?

    > I just put the last of the mini-fruitcakes into the oven. I decided
    > to bake the whole batch in muffin form. The recipe calls for brown
    > paper lining for the pans and I have no brown paper. I do have
    > cupcake liners, however. So there you have it.
    >
    > The first 30 cakes weren't packed into the cups. It's been way too
    > long since I make them last. I filled them to the top, then went back
    > to the computer (no ink in the printer) and found out I should have
    > filled them only 2/3 full. So I removed the top third and baked them.
    > Poured rum over them when they came out of the oven. Lots of rum. I
    > had to tip the pans to pour the excess off the tops, then lift the
    > cakes out of the pans so they could sit on a towel and dry out a bit.
    > There was stil rum standing in the emptied pans. Sheesh!
    >
    > Over half of the batter remained. I made 18 tightly packed cakes,
    > full to the top (I hope they don't do something weird because of
    > that). I plan on measuring out a tablespoon of rum for each cake this
    > time. Not to worry ... they'll get more in the morning.
    >
    > Tomorrow, I'll decorate the cakes. You cut cherries in half and glue
    > them to the top of the cakes with corn syrup. On larger cakes, you
    > can make beautiful patterns with pecan halves, candied cherries, and
    > pineapple. I'll make some examples on a plate tomorrow and take
    > photos to add to the fruitcake album on my Yahoo photo site (link in
    > sig).
    >
    > In the meantime, I have posted pictures of what I've done so far, if
    > anyone's interested.


    Very nice baking presentation, Carol! I've copied your fruitcake recipe
    before and will make it one of these days. I've already baked five
    different fruitcakes for this year.

    I confess, I would simply not have the patience to fill all those danged
    individual cups! By the time I complete the finished batter, all I want to
    do is chuck it into a tube pan or large loaf pans. You must have the
    patience of Job! <g>

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  3. On 11 Dec 2005 07:44:05 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Very nice baking presentation, Carol! I've copied your fruitcake recipe
    > before and will make it one of these days. I've already baked five
    > different fruitcakes for this year.


    Thanks. *smile* Five? That's a lot of fruitcake!

    > I confess, I would simply not have the patience to fill all those danged
    > individual cups! By the time I complete the finished batter, all I want to
    > do is chuck it into a tube pan or large loaf pans. You must have the
    > patience of Job! <g>


    It's a lot easier than lining all those pans! That's so
    time-consuming. I did look, with great lust, at a flexy, rubberish
    tube pan, but couldn't afford it at the time.

    How do you bake your fruitcakes? The only way I know is to line the
    pan with paper. You don't grease the pans, do you? Or do you?

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  4. On Sun 11 Dec 2005 12:05:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Damsel in
    dis Dress?

    > On 11 Dec 2005 07:44:05 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Very nice baking presentation, Carol! I've copied your fruitcake
    >> recipe before and will make it one of these days. I've already baked
    >> five different fruitcakes for this year.

    >
    > Thanks. *smile* Five? That's a lot of fruitcake!


    What can I say? I'm just a big fruit, er, nut! Actually, I had 4 recipes
    from friends whom I trust to bake excellent fruitcakes. The 6th was a
    recipe my family has made for many years. I just wanted to compare. <g>

    >> I confess, I would simply not have the patience to fill all those
    >> danged individual cups! By the time I complete the finished batter,
    >> all I want to do is chuck it into a tube pan or large loaf pans. You
    >> must have the patience of Job! <g>

    >
    > It's a lot easier than lining all those pans! That's so
    > time-consuming. I did look, with great lust, at a flexy, rubberish
    > tube pan, but couldn't afford it at the time.


    I'm not convinced that I'd like those pans. I can't imagine the shape
    remaining stable when full.

    > How do you bake your fruitcakes? The only way I know is to line the
    > pan with paper. You don't grease the pans, do you? Or do you?


    I prep the pans the day before. I smear Crisco liberally over the entire
    pan interior, then line with virgin brown grocery bags cut to fit.
    Finally, I smear Crisco liberally over the brown paper. Works like a
    charm. I tried using parchment once, but it was a disaster. Too fragile.

    I bake the cakes in a very slow oven of 275° F. with a 9 x 13 pan of
    boiling water on the rack below. The large cakes like a tube pan bake for
    about 3 hours. The first two hours the pans are covered lightly with foil.
    Foil then removed, then continue baking for a half hour. Pan of water
    removed and continue baking for another half hour or until the top begins
    to dry slightly. Out of the oven they get liberally splashed with a
    rum/brandy mix, then cooled for about 45 minutes. Removed from pan and
    continue cooling on rack, brushing with more of the rum/brandy. When cold
    I wrap in booze-soaked muslin, then in plastic wrap, then in foil.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  5. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 01:05:17 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 11 Dec 2005 07:44:05 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Very nice baking presentation, Carol! I've copied your fruitcake recipe
    >> before and will make it one of these days. I've already baked five
    >> different fruitcakes for this year.

    >
    >Thanks. *smile* Five? That's a lot of fruitcake!
    >
    >> I confess, I would simply not have the patience to fill all those danged
    >> individual cups! By the time I complete the finished batter, all I want to
    >> do is chuck it into a tube pan or large loaf pans. You must have the
    >> patience of Job! <g>

    >
    >It's a lot easier than lining all those pans! That's so
    >time-consuming. I did look, with great lust, at a flexy, rubberish
    >tube pan, but couldn't afford it at the time.
    >
    >How do you bake your fruitcakes? The only way I know is to line the
    >pan with paper. You don't grease the pans, do you? Or do you?
    >
    >Carol
    >--
    >
    >http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos


    Wow, Carol. Wonderful. But I too couldn't be bothered making all those
    cupcakes. Mind you, preparing the cake tin is a chore, but I learnt a
    hint from my mother-in-law some years ago, which I now follow.

    Previously I followed my mother's method. Since a large fruit cake
    needs long slow cooking you need to ensure the sides and bottom don't
    get overdone while the inside is cooking. My mother would grease a
    large tin, line it with layers of newspaper then finish off with a
    layer of brown paper, also greased. It took ages to prepare the tin.

    My mother-in-law, on the other hand, used cardboard. She had the
    cardboard cut to line the base, more to line the sides, then covered
    that with a layer of greaseproof paper, which she greased. She saved
    the cardboard from one year to the next, so there was only the
    greaseproof paper to cut each year. I do the same thing now.

    Kathy in NZ
     
  6. On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 09:04:16 GMT, [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:

    > Wow, Carol. Wonderful. But I too couldn't be bothered making all those
    > cupcakes. Mind you, preparing the cake tin is a chore, but I learnt a
    > hint from my mother-in-law some years ago, which I now follow.


    Making the cupcakes was a fatal mistake. They're only about an inch
    tall. I'd intended them as gifts for a couple people. : (

    > Previously I followed my mother's method. Since a large fruit cake
    > needs long slow cooking you need to ensure the sides and bottom don't
    > get overdone while the inside is cooking. My mother would grease a
    > large tin, line it with layers of newspaper then finish off with a
    > layer of brown paper, also greased. It took ages to prepare the tin.


    THAT'S why! Okay, thank you! I've wondered what was so magical about
    two or more layers of brown paper! I knew there must be a practical
    reason for it. I just didn't know what the reason was.

    > My mother-in-law, on the other hand, used cardboard. She had the
    > cardboard cut to line the base, more to line the sides, then covered
    > that with a layer of greaseproof paper, which she greased. She saved
    > the cardboard from one year to the next, so there was only the
    > greaseproof paper to cut each year. I do the same thing now.


    Your mother-in-law is a genius. Next time I make fruitcake, I'll have
    cardboard at the ready.

    THANK YOU AGAIN!
    Carol, having a frustrating, sleepless night
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  7. On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 09:04:16 GMT, [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:

    > Wow, Carol. Wonderful. But I too couldn't be bothered making all those
    > cupcakes. Mind you, preparing the cake tin is a chore, but I learnt a
    > hint from my mother-in-law some years ago, which I now follow.


    Making the cupcakes was a fatal mistake. They're only about an inch
    tall. I'd intended them as gifts for a couple people. : (

    > Previously I followed my mother's method. Since a large fruit cake
    > needs long slow cooking you need to ensure the sides and bottom don't
    > get overdone while the inside is cooking. My mother would grease a
    > large tin, line it with layers of newspaper then finish off with a
    > layer of brown paper, also greased. It took ages to prepare the tin.


    THAT'S why! Okay, thank you! I've wondered what was so magical about
    two or more layers of brown paper! I knew there must be a practical
    reason for it. I just didn't know what the reason was.

    > My mother-in-law, on the other hand, used cardboard. She had the
    > cardboard cut to line the base, more to line the sides, then covered
    > that with a layer of greaseproof paper, which she greased. She saved
    > the cardboard from one year to the next, so there was only the
    > greaseproof paper to cut each year. I do the same thing now.


    Your mother-in-law is a genius. Next time I make fruitcake, I'll have
    cardboard at the ready.

    THANK YOU AGAIN!
    Carol, having a frustrating, sleepless night
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  8. The Cook

    The Cook Guest

    On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 01:05:17 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 11 Dec 2005 07:44:05 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Very nice baking presentation, Carol! I've copied your fruitcake recipe
    >> before and will make it one of these days. I've already baked five
    >> different fruitcakes for this year.

    >
    >Thanks. *smile* Five? That's a lot of fruitcake!
    >
    >> I confess, I would simply not have the patience to fill all those danged
    >> individual cups! By the time I complete the finished batter, all I want to
    >> do is chuck it into a tube pan or large loaf pans. You must have the
    >> patience of Job! <g>

    >
    >It's a lot easier than lining all those pans! That's so
    >time-consuming. I did look, with great lust, at a flexy, rubberish
    >tube pan, but couldn't afford it at the time.
    >
    >How do you bake your fruitcakes? The only way I know is to line the
    >pan with paper. You don't grease the pans, do you? Or do you?
    >
    >Carol


    I bake 2 batches of fruitcake each year. I use regular loaf pans and
    prep them with the Crisco, oil, and flour pan coating. They all come
    out just fine. This year I used the last of the batter to make mini
    bundt cakes. Used a brush to get the coating spread.

    BTW, the pan coating does not need to be refrigerated. Keeps fine on
    the shelf.

    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974
     
  9. On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 08:38:13 -0500, The Cook <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I bake 2 batches of fruitcake each year. I use regular loaf pans and
    > prep them with the Crisco, oil, and flour pan coating. They all come
    > out just fine. This year I used the last of the batter to make mini
    > bundt cakes. Used a brush to get the coating spread.


    That pan coating works great, doesnt' it? And you don't get burned
    sides and bottoms when you use the coating without paper, etc.?

    > BTW, the pan coating does not need to be refrigerated. Keeps fine on
    > the shelf.


    Good to know. Thank you!

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  10. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > I just put the last of the mini-fruitcakes into the oven. I decided
    > to bake the whole batch in muffin form. The recipe calls for brown
    > paper lining for the pans and I have no brown paper. I do have
    > cupcake liners, however. So there you have it.


    Good luck with the fruit cake. I made mine the other day. I don't have loaf
    pans. I use my mother's pans. I was going to go down to get them but I had to
    drive her to a visitation at a funeral home the other day and she suggested
    that I just bring the fruit and stuff and do it in her kitchen. That would
    save me having to go all the way back to return the pans.

    Last year I was disappointed at my first attempt at fruit cake, but she had
    told me that it has to sit for a while, with or without some booze added. So
    I sprinkled it with brandy and tried it again a week later. It was much
    improved.

    When I got home with my four large loaves of fruit cake I cut each in half,
    sprinkled with brandy and wrapped them up. I couldn't resist the urge to try
    a piece right away. It was fantastic, not at all disappointing like the
    first sample last year's cake. This one does not need to sit, but it is only
    two weeks until Christmas. If I get into that stuff now it won't last.
     
  11. The Cook

    The Cook Guest

    On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 08:01:22 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 08:38:13 -0500, The Cook <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> I bake 2 batches of fruitcake each year. I use regular loaf pans and
    >> prep them with the Crisco, oil, and flour pan coating. They all come
    >> out just fine. This year I used the last of the batter to make mini
    >> bundt cakes. Used a brush to get the coating spread.

    >
    >That pan coating works great, doesnt' it? And you don't get burned
    >sides and bottoms when you use the coating without paper, etc.?


    So far I haven't. I am using 8" X 4" loaf pans and bake for
    approximately 1 1/2 hours at 300°. No burning. I have not tried it
    in a large tube pan lately. I see to remember using a Bundt pan many
    years ago. No way in hell to put paper in them.

    >
    >> BTW, the pan coating does not need to be refrigerated. Keeps fine on
    >> the shelf.

    >
    >Good to know. Thank you!
    >
    >Carol

    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974
     
  12. Dawn

    Dawn Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 09:04:16 GMT, [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Wow, Carol. Wonderful. But I too couldn't be bothered making all those
    >>cupcakes. Mind you, preparing the cake tin is a chore, but I learnt a
    >>hint from my mother-in-law some years ago, which I now follow.

    >
    >
    > Making the cupcakes was a fatal mistake. They're only about an inch
    > tall. I'd intended them as gifts for a couple people. : (
    >


    The batter doesn't rise much, so when I make fruitcupcakes I fill them
    pretty full.

    They've been popular around here, one of those things that I don't tell
    people what they are until they go back for seconds. My FIL liked them
    most, and I haven't had the heart to make them since he died. Maybe next
    winter.


    Dawn
     
  13. On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 05:03:11 GMT, Dawn <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > > On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 09:04:16 GMT, [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:
    > >
    > > Making the cupcakes was a fatal mistake. They're only about an inch
    > > tall. I'd intended them as gifts for a couple people. : (

    >
    > The batter doesn't rise much, so when I make fruitcupcakes I fill them
    > pretty full.


    Yup, that's what I did with the second round. It's not as bad as I
    thought. I put them in new cupcake papers (the other ones were ruined
    by the rum), glued half cherries on top, and will finish wrapping them
    in plastic wrap when I find more tape. Pics of the finished products
    are on Yahoo now.

    > They've been popular around here, one of those things that I don't tell
    > people what they are until they go back for seconds. My FIL liked them
    > most, and I haven't had the heart to make them since he died. Maybe next
    > winter.


    Crash even wants to try one, once the alcohol settles down a bit. And
    he swears he hates fruitcake (but I got him to taste the batter, and
    he liked it). We have a chihuahua/terrier mix who cries and cries for
    them. Little lush.

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  14. On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 05:03:11 GMT, Dawn <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > They've been popular around here, one of those things that I don't tell
    > people what they are until they go back for seconds. My FIL liked them
    > most, and I haven't had the heart to make them since he died. Maybe next
    > winter.


    I'm sorry about your loss. It can be hard to take that first step.

    My daughter is that way about pancakes. Dad passed in '96, and she
    still can't face a pancake that wasn't made by her grampa.

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
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