Opinions/Experiences of tubular tyres

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by njeitner, May 15, 2006.

  1. njeitner

    njeitner New Member

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    I'm appealing to those people experienced with tubular tyres to share their experiences and recommendations of tubular tyres.

    I'm about to take delivery of a new, race specific bike (Cervelo Soloist team) and decided to experiment with tubulars. Veloflex clinchers are my first choice as a race tyre, they're light and very grippy. But what about tubulars? The two most common brands recommended to me have been conti's and tufo. But what are peoples real world experiences with these and possible other brands?
     
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  2. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

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    I have an old set of Conti Sprinters, finally took them off when one flatted and the other was getting rather tattered. They were excellent tires, quite durable.

    Veloflex comes (I believe) from the factory that originally made Vittorias before Vittoria moved their production to Asia. I had good luck with an old set of Euro made Vittorias.

    Can't speak directly for Tufo.

    I blew some money last year and bought a pair of Dugast cotton tubies. Pricey items, but they saw me through a season of riding with no flats, still have them mounted and ready to go, if it will ever stop raining. Only downside is - don't leave the wheelset in the back seat of a car on a sunny day - the heat loosened the glue that holds the tread to the casing, and I had to break out the tubie glue to reseal the edge of the tread. Live and learn...


     
  3. rbtmcardle

    rbtmcardle New Member

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    I ride Zipp 404 with Tufo S3 lite - great tires, fast, no flats so far (1200 miles) I am thinking about getting a set of Conti Competition Tubulars on sale for $70 at performance
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I've done that, too ... quite disconcerting -- I lost two Hutchinson tires that way as the sidewall blew out when the rim superheated ... the sun "moved" and the shady spot that the car was parked in received some direct sunlight!

    There ARE other downsides to using tubulars.

    Perhaps, the main thing is that you need at least one spare rim on which you will stretch the new tires. The rim does not need to be new, and it does not need to be laced.

    The first time you try to mount a 700c-equivalent tubular, you will think it is a 650c-equivalent ... at least, I did.

    DON'T CARRY AN UN-PRESTRETCHED TIRE AS YOUR SPARE OTHERWISE YOU WILL BE A VERY UNHAPPY CAMPER.

    By inference, you should realize that once you commit to tubulars, you will probably want to have between two-and-six spare/new tires in reserve!

    Repairing a tubular is very, VERY tedious.

    Gluing them up can be tedious and messy. I've learned that you can use much less glue than you might have read OR think ... but, I wasn't CRIT or CX racing. With a 36h wheel, I ended up just putting a DAB of glue between each spoke hole to secure the tire -- I never rolled a sew-up tire off the rim, FWIW.

    The TUFO tape is supposed to be a good for mounting tubulars, but it costs much more than a tube of rim glue.
     
  5. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    Also doesn't need to be a tubular rim.
     
  6. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    If you compete you should use tubular tires... if you compete in my category, please use tubular tires, as I will gladly take the small advantage I gain over you in regards to rolling resistance with my clinchers. :D
     
  7. vascdoc

    vascdoc New Member

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    I used tubulars for most of my riding in my younger years. I use to ride Clement Criterium Seta (220 gram tire) used primarly for track on the road. They cost 15 dollars then. Nothing quite like them. But clinchers have come a long way since then. I would not go back to them. The difference and cost does not balance out for me. One thing is clear - you will never repair a tubular. I tried it and you will tend to just discard the tubular. That is part of the price of using them.
     
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