opinions of cyclesak?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Anna Nonamus, May 25, 2003.

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  1. Anna Nonamus

    Anna Nonamus Guest

    I'm looking for a waterproof cover for my mountain bike.

    Does anyone have any opinions of CycleSak? -- www.cyclesak.com

    I think there are other similar products out there, but I can't seem to find any. Anyone know
    of anything?
     
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  2. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Anna Nonamus <...> says...
    > I'm looking for a waterproof cover for my mountain bike.
    >
    > Does anyone have any opinions of CycleSak? -- www.cyclesak.com
    >
    > I think there are other similar products out there, but I can't seem to find any. Anyone know of
    > anything?
    >

    $65??? i may be cheap, but won't a $10 tarp do the same thing (though not look as good)?
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  3. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > I'm looking for a waterproof cover for my mountain bike.

    Why don't you just take it inside with you?

    > Does anyone have any opinions of CycleSak? -- www.cyclesak.com

    My oipnion is it looks like a fitted tarp.

    > I think there are other similar products out there, but I can't seem to find any. Anyone know of
    > anything?

    Sure. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=878
     
  4. Anna Nonamus

    Anna Nonamus Guest

    > $65??? i may be cheap, but won't a $10 tarp do the same thing (though not look as good)?

    You're not cheap. $65=that's why I'm looking for an alternative.

    Have tried tarps: Cumbersone to attach so as to prevent from blowing off when I'm driving down the
    road at 65 mph. Also big and unwieldly to fold up neatly, ... don't fit in a backpack very well.
     
  5. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Anna Nonamus <...> says...
    > >
    > > $65??? i may be cheap, but won't a $10 tarp do the same thing (though not look as good)?
    >
    > You're not cheap. $65=that's why I'm looking for an alternative.
    >
    > Have tried tarps: Cumbersone to attach so as to prevent from blowing off when I'm driving down the
    > road at 65 mph. Also big and unwieldly to fold up neatly, ... don't fit in a backpack very well.
    >

    assuming you have some sewing knowledge, make one. Penny S., the resident fabric guru may be able to
    provide an idea on fabric types.

    My best thought would be a high grade water-proof material, like tent fabric, but better (perhaps).
    pattern it out to get the shape, and have the bottom with a drawstring closure.

    Again, the resident fabric guru may provide more detailed, and or accurate information.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  6. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Anna Nonamus thoughtfully penned:
    >> $65??? i may be cheap, but won't a $10 tarp do the same thing (though not look as good)?
    >
    > You're not cheap. $65=that's why I'm looking for an alternative.
    >
    > Have tried tarps: Cumbersone to attach so as to prevent from blowing off when I'm driving down the
    > road at 65 mph. Also big and unwieldly to fold up neatly, ... don't fit in a backpack very well.

    why not just cover the seat? Or use a bug guard? Are you afraid to get the bike wet and or dirty?
    I'm sorry I dont' get why you want to tarp your bikes on a roof rack

    Penny
     
  7. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Anna Nonamus thoughtfully penned:
    > I'm looking for a waterproof cover for my mountain bike.
    >
    > Does anyone have any opinions of CycleSak? -- www.cyclesak.com
    >
    > I think there are other similar products out there, but I can't seem to find any. Anyone know of
    > anything?

    I went to website as in "what is that anyway" and being the resident fabrics goddess, I'll tell you
    these things. I sure wouldn't get the lightweight model 70 denier is very very very lightweight
    fabric. Think "shred". There is no such thing as "standard seam tape". the kind of tape used totally
    depends on what kind of coating the fabric is... which they don't even say IF the fabric is coated.
    (coating to make the fabric waterproof) If they only weld critical seams it means there are a whole
    lot of seams that they didn't weld. Weatherproof does not mean waterproof. Obfuscation really bugs
    me. Me - I'd put a baggie over my seat and be done with it.

    There isn't any anti UV treatment on the fabric, ,how long do you suppose that the cover will
    really last you. If you read the reivew posted from and old issue of M-bike magazine, it is
    designed for a cover when you park your bike outside in front your local coffee shop or your
    apartment, not for rooftop travel. I'm sure one of the engineer types could tell you just how
    quickly it might shred at 65 mph.

    Penny S

    --
    Specialty Outdoors Modification & Repair of Outdoor Gear & Clothing Factory Authorized by The North
    Face www.specialtyoutdoors.com/whatis.htm
     
  8. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Anna Nonamus thoughtfully penned:
    > >> $65??? i may be cheap, but won't a $10 tarp do the same thing (though not look as good)?
    > >
    > > You're not cheap. $65=that's why I'm looking for an alternative.
    > >
    > > Have tried tarps: Cumbersone to attach so as to prevent from blowing off when I'm driving
    > > down the road at 65 mph. Also big and unwieldly to fold up neatly, ... don't fit in a
    > > backpack very well.
    >
    > why not just cover the seat? Or use a bug guard? Are you afraid to get the bike wet and or dirty?
    > I'm sorry I dont' get why you want to tarp your bikes on a roof rack
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    >

    hmm, i completely missed that. nice catch. really hate to get those off-road bikes a bit
    wet or dirty.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  9. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Anna Nonamus thoughtfully penned:
    > > I'm looking for a waterproof cover for my mountain bike.
    > >
    > > Does anyone have any opinions of CycleSak? -- www.cyclesak.com
    > >
    > > I think there are other similar products out there, but I can't seem to find any. Anyone know of
    > > anything?
    >
    > I went to website as in "what is that anyway" and being the resident fabrics goddess, I'll tell
    > you these things. I sure wouldn't get the lightweight model 70 denier is very very very
    > lightweight fabric. Think "shred". There is no such thing as "standard seam tape". the kind of
    > tape used totally depends on what kind of coating the fabric is... which they don't even say IF
    > the fabric is coated. (coating to make the fabric waterproof) If they only weld critical seams it
    > means there are a whole lot of seams that they didn't weld. Weatherproof does not mean waterproof.
    > Obfuscation really bugs me. Me - I'd put a baggie over my seat and be done with it.
    >
    > There isn't any anti UV treatment on the fabric, ,how long do you suppose that the cover will
    > really last you. If you read the reivew posted from and old issue of M-bike magazine, it is
    > designed for a cover when you park your bike outside in front your local coffee shop or your
    > apartment, not for rooftop travel. I'm sure one of the engineer types could tell you just how
    > quickly it might shred at 65 mph.
    >
    >
    > Penny S
    >
    >

    Now take a bow of respect, for the fabric goddess has spoken. ;-)
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  10. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

  11. Anna Nonamus

    Anna Nonamus Guest

    I know mountain bikes are meant to be gotten dirty and muddy and such, jeeze, ... but they are also
    meant to be cleaned after doing so.

    I keep my bike in the bed of a pickup, the bed doesn't have a cover or cap, so travelling down a
    highway for an hour all the road-dirt swirls around and gets all over the bike, in the chain, clings
    to the lubed areas, -- I don't much like cleaning and lubing my bike and then having road dust and
    grit cover it before I ever sit in the seat .... And leaving the bike exposed to rain for a few days
    in the bed of my truck doesn't make sense.

    The rain seems to have caused rust to start appearing where one metal part contacts another metal
    part -- where bolts are attached to the frame for example.

    >
    > hmm, i completely missed that. nice catch. really hate to get those off-road bikes a bit wet
    > or dirty.
     
  12. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Anna Nonamus thoughtfully penned:
    > I know mountain bikes are meant to be gotten dirty and muddy and such, jeeze, ... but they are
    > also meant to be cleaned after doing so.
    >
    > I keep my bike in the bed of a pickup, the bed doesn't have a cover or cap, so travelling down a
    > highway for an hour all the road-dirt swirls around and gets all over the bike, in the chain,
    > clings to the lubed areas, -- I don't much like cleaning and lubing my bike and then having road
    > dust and grit cover it before I ever sit in the seat .... And leaving the bike exposed to rain for
    > a few days in the bed of my truck doesn't make sense.
    >

    why do you store your bikes in the bed of a pickup truck?
     
  13. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > I keep my bike in the bed of a pickup, the bed doesn't have a cover or
    cap,
    > so travelling down a highway for an hour all the road-dirt swirls around and gets all over the
    > bike, in the chain, clings to the lubed areas,

    What do you suppose happens after you ride on a trail for an hour?

    Wrap it in a $5 tarp if you're that anal - or use a 2 cent paper towel to wipe off the seat.

    Keep in mind, covers tend to wear the paint off whatever it is they cover - so if you really care
    about it, leave it uncovered or put it in the cab with you.

    > And leaving the bike exposed to rain for a few days in the bed of my truck doesn't make sense.

    You're right - it sounds downright silly. Take it in the house after you're done.

    > The rain seems to have caused rust to start appearing where one metal part contacts another metal
    > part -- where bolts are attached to the frame for example.

    Covers only trap moisture in. Take it in the house and let it dry.
     
  14. Anna Nonamus

    Anna Nonamus Guest

    > why do you store your bikes in the bed of a pickup truck?

    It's only 'stored' there when I travel, such as for work, or when go into the mountains for a long
    weekend. When I'm at home it goes inside. When I travel for work and stay at a hotel I can't really
    bring it inside. What would you do if you were driving across the country, as in from the east coast
    to Utah or Colorado?
     
  15. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > > why do you store your bikes in the bed of a pickup truck?
    >
    > It's only 'stored' there when I travel, such as for work, or when go into the mountains for a long
    > weekend. When I'm at home it goes inside. When
    I
    > travel for work and stay at a hotel I can't really bring it inside.

    Why's that?

    > What would you do if you were driving across the country, as in from the east coast to Utah or
    > Colorado?

    Certainly not leave an expensive bike in the back of a pickup truck for someone to take.
     
  16. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Anna Nonamus thoughtfully penned:
    >> why do you store your bikes in the bed of a pickup truck?
    >
    > It's only 'stored' there when I travel, such as for work, or when go into the mountains for a long
    > weekend. When I'm at home it goes inside. When I travel for work and stay at a hotel I can't
    > really bring it inside. What would you do if you were driving across the country, as in from the
    > east coast to Utah or Colorado?

    I've done Norcal to Eastern WA.... I mount them on the hitch rack, make sure they are secure/locked
    and that my tail lights can be seen and be done with it. I wouldn't hesitate to bring my bike into
    a hotel or building if I felt it would be more secure.

    Penny S
     
  17. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Anna Nonamus" <...> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > >
    > It's only 'stored' there when I travel, such as for work, or when go into the mountains for a long
    > weekend. When I'm at home it goes inside. When I travel for work and stay at a hotel I can't
    > really bring it inside. What would you do if you were driving across the country, as in from the
    > east coast to Utah or Colorado?

    This is the only thing I can think of http://www.heeters.com/covers.shtml
    http://sportsbay.com/mopandscootc.html

    They'll be a bit large for a bike, but that one is pretty cheap.

    --
    Slacker
     
  18. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    John Harlow thoughtfully penned:
    >>> why do you store your bikes in the bed of a pickup truck?
    >>
    >> It's only 'stored' there when I travel, such as for work, or when go into the mountains for a
    >> long weekend. When I'm at home it goes inside. When I travel for work and stay at a hotel I can't
    >> really bring it inside.
    >
    > Why's that?
    >
    >> What would you do if you were driving across the country, as in from the east coast to Utah or
    >> Colorado?
    >
    > Certainly not leave an expensive bike in the back of a pickup truck for someone to take.

    In some cities ( Bend for example) they specifically warn against leaving bikes "out" unattended,
    even if locked.

    penny
     
  19. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Slacker thoughtfully penned:
    > "Anna Nonamus" <...> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >> It's only 'stored' there when I travel, such as for work, or when go into the mountains for a
    >> long weekend. When I'm at home it goes inside. When I travel for work and stay at a hotel I can't
    >> really bring it inside. What would you do if you were driving across the country, as in from the
    >> east coast to Utah or Colorado?
    >
    >
    > This is the only thing I can think of http://www.heeters.com/covers.shtml
    > http://sportsbay.com/mopandscootc.html
    >
    > They'll be a bit large for a bike, but that one is pretty cheap.

    how do much wind force would there be in the back of a truck and do you think it would hold? (parked
    is a different story)

    one last thought... being as you now say the bikes are in the bed of your truck and not on a roof
    the sacks might work but I really would worry about wind shear and fabric tearing. They aren't
    designed for that, they are designed for static ( non-moving) storage, keeping dust off in a carport
    or something like that.

    penny
     
  20. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Slacker thoughtfully penned:
    > > "Anna Nonamus" <...> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > >>>
    > >> It's only 'stored' there when I travel, such as for work, or when go into the mountains for a
    > >> long weekend. When I'm at home it goes inside. When I travel for work and stay at a hotel I
    > >> can't really bring it inside. What would you do if you were driving across the country, as in
    > >> from the east coast to Utah or Colorado?
    > >
    > >
    > > This is the only thing I can think of http://www.heeters.com/covers.shtml
    > > http://sportsbay.com/mopandscootc.html
    > >
    > > They'll be a bit large for a bike, but that one is pretty cheap.
    >
    > how do much wind force would there be in the back of a truck and do you think it would hold?
    > (parked is a different story)
    >
    > one last thought... being as you now say the bikes are in the bed of your truck and not on a roof
    > the sacks might work but I really would worry about wind shear and fabric tearing. They aren't
    > designed for that, they are designed for static ( non-moving) storage, keeping dust off in a
    > carport or something like that.
    >
    > penny
    >

    A lightweight fabric will quickly wear through where the weight of the bike presses against the
    deck. Bar ends and pedals etc. will go first. What about getting someone at a Saddlery Shop to sew a
    dirty great zipper around the edges of a tarp (fold it in half and zip up!), or buy a customised
    horse cover? Probably not waterproof but certainly hard wearing and dust and weather resistant.
    Getting a zip sewn onto a tarp should be releatively cheap.
    --
    Westie
     
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