Opinions on versatile bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fred Barney, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    roads. I'm thinking:

    a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks

    b) Cyclocross

    c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet

    Opinions?
     
    Tags:


  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Fred Barney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    > a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Sounds like any of those would work, but a 'cross bike would be more fun.
    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    Good price. The Bianchi Volpe would also work, and it's even cheaper than
    the Surly.
     
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Fred Barney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    > a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Sounds like any of those would work, but a 'cross bike would be more fun.
    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    Good price. The Bianchi Volpe would also work, and it's even cheaper than
    the Surly.
     
  4. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Fred Barney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    > a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Sounds like any of those would work, but a 'cross bike would be more fun.
    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    Good price. The Bianchi Volpe would also work, and it's even cheaper than
    the Surly.
     
  5. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Fred Barney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    > a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Sounds like any of those would work, but a 'cross bike would be more fun.
    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    Good price. The Bianchi Volpe would also work, and it's even cheaper than
    the Surly.
     
  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Fred Barney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    > a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    > b) Cyclocross
    >
    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Sounds like any of those would work, but a 'cross bike would be more fun.
    http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    Good price. The Bianchi Volpe would also work, and it's even cheaper than
    the Surly.
     
  7. Fred Barney wrote:

    > I already have a fully suspended MTB and a road racer,
    > but I want something to fill the gap.


    Sounds like the definition of a 'crosser:

    http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/05/CE/spec/5xr8blu.jpg

    --
    "Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much
    to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes,
    it has not died out." -- The Daily Telegraph (1877)
     
  8. Fred Barney wrote:

    > I already have a fully suspended MTB and a road racer,
    > but I want something to fill the gap.


    Sounds like the definition of a 'crosser:

    http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/05/CE/spec/5xr8blu.jpg

    --
    "Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much
    to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes,
    it has not died out." -- The Daily Telegraph (1877)
     
  9. Fred Barney wrote:

    > I already have a fully suspended MTB and a road racer,
    > but I want something to fill the gap.


    Sounds like the definition of a 'crosser:

    http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/05/CE/spec/5xr8blu.jpg

    --
    "Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much
    to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes,
    it has not died out." -- The Daily Telegraph (1877)
     
  10. Fred Barney wrote:

    > I already have a fully suspended MTB and a road racer,
    > but I want something to fill the gap.


    Sounds like the definition of a 'crosser:

    http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/05/CE/spec/5xr8blu.jpg

    --
    "Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much
    to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes,
    it has not died out." -- The Daily Telegraph (1877)
     
  11. Fred Barney wrote:

    > I already have a fully suspended MTB and a road racer,
    > but I want something to fill the gap.


    Sounds like the definition of a 'crosser:

    http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/05/CE/spec/5xr8blu.jpg

    --
    "Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much
    to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes,
    it has not died out." -- The Daily Telegraph (1877)
     
  12. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:


    I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    any bike.

    Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    those tires on my track bike.

    Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    those sound like the riding you are doing.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  13. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:


    I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    any bike.

    Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    those tires on my track bike.

    Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    those sound like the riding you are doing.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  14. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:


    I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    any bike.

    Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    those tires on my track bike.

    Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    those sound like the riding you are doing.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  15. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:


    I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    any bike.

    Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    those tires on my track bike.

    Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    those sound like the riding you are doing.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  16. On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 14:25:00 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:

    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    > consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    > about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    > steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    > potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    > road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    > of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    > that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    > roads. I'm thinking:


    I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    any bike.

    Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    those tires on my track bike.

    Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    those sound like the riding you are doing.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  17. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    > mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    > getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    > not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    > any bike.
    >
    > Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    > wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    > those tires on my track bike.
    >
    > Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    > cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    > is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    > those sound like the riding you are doing.


    How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    best choice.
     
  18. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    > mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    > getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    > not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    > any bike.
    >
    > Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    > wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    > those tires on my track bike.
    >
    > Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    > cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    > is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    > those sound like the riding you are doing.


    How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    best choice.
     
  19. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    > mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    > getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    > not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    > any bike.
    >
    > Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    > wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    > those tires on my track bike.
    >
    > Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    > cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    > is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    > those sound like the riding you are doing.


    How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    best choice.
     
  20. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > I think you can use a road bike for what you are talking about. I've used
    > mine on rides with miles of gravel, with no real problems aside from it
    > getting dirty. If you take reasonable care, occasional dirt roads are
    > not a problem. You might occasionally cut a tire, but you can do that on
    > any bike.
    >
    > Just about all road bikes can take tires that are (real measurement) 25mm
    > wide with substantial tread, like the Avocet Cross tire. Heck, I've used
    > those tires on my track bike.
    >
    > Of course, a sport touring frame would allow even bigger tires, as would a
    > cross bike, but a touring bike is more for loaded trips, and a cross bike
    > is the original cross-country design (pre mountain bike). Neither of
    > those sound like the riding you are doing.


    How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    best choice.
     
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