Opinions on versatile bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fred Barney, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. >Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    bike such as Bruce Gordon model?

    I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    aren't the answer

    I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    use it for abt anything?
     


  2. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Fred Barney <[email protected]> writes:

    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Personally I like the c) option, especially if we're talking
    about randonneur-config'd bikes. I note cyclocross bikes have
    been mentioned a lot, but I think those things come with a lot
    of unnecessary specs for your wants & needs. I think
    randonneur-specific bikes come with a whole bunch of desirables,
    including all the eyelets you might need, lightness, inside-the-
    frame wiring for generator lights, nice geometry, faster & fairly
    aero riding position, etc.

    But a rigid-forked MTB is good for 50-milers on varied terrain and
    surfaces too, but maybe not as light & fast as you might want.
    If you pathologically need to chase down and pass every bike rider
    you see ahead of you, do not go the MTB route. But if you just
    wanna economically (in several senses of the word) get there, old,
    rigid-forked MTBs fill the bill quite nicely. Especially if the
    frame is a little taller and a little longer than for real
    single-track riding. And some higher-priced 26x1.5" tires that
    are rated for at least 60 psi will give you a little more speed.

    For bike one might want to stick a single pannier on, though,
    I still like the randonneur configs. Like the Mariposa
    Randonneur, or the Marinoni Turismo.

    Well, you asked for opinions ...


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Fred Barney <[email protected]> writes:

    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Personally I like the c) option, especially if we're talking
    about randonneur-config'd bikes. I note cyclocross bikes have
    been mentioned a lot, but I think those things come with a lot
    of unnecessary specs for your wants & needs. I think
    randonneur-specific bikes come with a whole bunch of desirables,
    including all the eyelets you might need, lightness, inside-the-
    frame wiring for generator lights, nice geometry, faster & fairly
    aero riding position, etc.

    But a rigid-forked MTB is good for 50-milers on varied terrain and
    surfaces too, but maybe not as light & fast as you might want.
    If you pathologically need to chase down and pass every bike rider
    you see ahead of you, do not go the MTB route. But if you just
    wanna economically (in several senses of the word) get there, old,
    rigid-forked MTBs fill the bill quite nicely. Especially if the
    frame is a little taller and a little longer than for real
    single-track riding. And some higher-priced 26x1.5" tires that
    are rated for at least 60 psi will give you a little more speed.

    For bike one might want to stick a single pannier on, though,
    I still like the randonneur configs. Like the Mariposa
    Randonneur, or the Marinoni Turismo.

    Well, you asked for opinions ...


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Fred Barney <[email protected]> writes:

    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Personally I like the c) option, especially if we're talking
    about randonneur-config'd bikes. I note cyclocross bikes have
    been mentioned a lot, but I think those things come with a lot
    of unnecessary specs for your wants & needs. I think
    randonneur-specific bikes come with a whole bunch of desirables,
    including all the eyelets you might need, lightness, inside-the-
    frame wiring for generator lights, nice geometry, faster & fairly
    aero riding position, etc.

    But a rigid-forked MTB is good for 50-milers on varied terrain and
    surfaces too, but maybe not as light & fast as you might want.
    If you pathologically need to chase down and pass every bike rider
    you see ahead of you, do not go the MTB route. But if you just
    wanna economically (in several senses of the word) get there, old,
    rigid-forked MTBs fill the bill quite nicely. Especially if the
    frame is a little taller and a little longer than for real
    single-track riding. And some higher-priced 26x1.5" tires that
    are rated for at least 60 psi will give you a little more speed.

    For bike one might want to stick a single pannier on, though,
    I still like the randonneur configs. Like the Mariposa
    Randonneur, or the Marinoni Turismo.

    Well, you asked for opinions ...


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Fred Barney <[email protected]> writes:

    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Personally I like the c) option, especially if we're talking
    about randonneur-config'd bikes. I note cyclocross bikes have
    been mentioned a lot, but I think those things come with a lot
    of unnecessary specs for your wants & needs. I think
    randonneur-specific bikes come with a whole bunch of desirables,
    including all the eyelets you might need, lightness, inside-the-
    frame wiring for generator lights, nice geometry, faster & fairly
    aero riding position, etc.

    But a rigid-forked MTB is good for 50-milers on varied terrain and
    surfaces too, but maybe not as light & fast as you might want.
    If you pathologically need to chase down and pass every bike rider
    you see ahead of you, do not go the MTB route. But if you just
    wanna economically (in several senses of the word) get there, old,
    rigid-forked MTBs fill the bill quite nicely. Especially if the
    frame is a little taller and a little longer than for real
    single-track riding. And some higher-priced 26x1.5" tires that
    are rated for at least 60 psi will give you a little more speed.

    For bike one might want to stick a single pannier on, though,
    I still like the randonneur configs. Like the Mariposa
    Randonneur, or the Marinoni Turismo.

    Well, you asked for opinions ...


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  6. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Fred Barney <[email protected]> writes:

    > c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet
    >
    > Opinions?


    Personally I like the c) option, especially if we're talking
    about randonneur-config'd bikes. I note cyclocross bikes have
    been mentioned a lot, but I think those things come with a lot
    of unnecessary specs for your wants & needs. I think
    randonneur-specific bikes come with a whole bunch of desirables,
    including all the eyelets you might need, lightness, inside-the-
    frame wiring for generator lights, nice geometry, faster & fairly
    aero riding position, etc.

    But a rigid-forked MTB is good for 50-milers on varied terrain and
    surfaces too, but maybe not as light & fast as you might want.
    If you pathologically need to chase down and pass every bike rider
    you see ahead of you, do not go the MTB route. But if you just
    wanna economically (in several senses of the word) get there, old,
    rigid-forked MTBs fill the bill quite nicely. Especially if the
    frame is a little taller and a little longer than for real
    single-track riding. And some higher-priced 26x1.5" tires that
    are rated for at least 60 psi will give you a little more speed.

    For bike one might want to stick a single pannier on, though,
    I still like the randonneur configs. Like the Mariposa
    Randonneur, or the Marinoni Turismo.

    Well, you asked for opinions ...


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  7. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    > lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    > your wants & needs.


    Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    about over fallen logs. LOL :p
     
  8. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    > lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    > your wants & needs.


    Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    about over fallen logs. LOL :p
     
  9. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    > lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    > your wants & needs.


    Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    about over fallen logs. LOL :p
     
  10. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    > lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    > your wants & needs.


    Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    about over fallen logs. LOL :p
     
  11. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    > lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    > your wants & needs.


    Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    about over fallen logs. LOL :p
     
  12. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >
    >> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >> your wants & needs.

    >
    > Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    > seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    > about over fallen logs. LOL :p


    If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    conditions.

    The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/.
    How apropos for a morning commute bike.

    The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in
    canada, and rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa
    Randonneur.

    When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked
    Norco Bigfoot, with the old style canti brakes 'n all.
    'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is tough enough. And I've
    invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch of
    musculature (especially in the calves) to make that
    weighty sonofabitch go.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  13. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >
    >> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >> your wants & needs.

    >
    > Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    > seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    > about over fallen logs. LOL :p


    If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    conditions.

    The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/.
    How apropos for a morning commute bike.

    The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in
    canada, and rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa
    Randonneur.

    When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked
    Norco Bigfoot, with the old style canti brakes 'n all.
    'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is tough enough. And I've
    invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch of
    musculature (especially in the calves) to make that
    weighty sonofabitch go.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  14. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >
    >> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >> your wants & needs.

    >
    > Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    > seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    > about over fallen logs. LOL :p


    If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    conditions.

    The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/.
    How apropos for a morning commute bike.

    The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in
    canada, and rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa
    Randonneur.

    When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked
    Norco Bigfoot, with the old style canti brakes 'n all.
    'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is tough enough. And I've
    invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch of
    musculature (especially in the calves) to make that
    weighty sonofabitch go.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  15. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >
    >> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >> your wants & needs.

    >
    > Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    > seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    > about over fallen logs. LOL :p


    If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    conditions.

    The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/.
    How apropos for a morning commute bike.

    The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in
    canada, and rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa
    Randonneur.

    When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked
    Norco Bigfoot, with the old style canti brakes 'n all.
    'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is tough enough. And I've
    invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch of
    musculature (especially in the calves) to make that
    weighty sonofabitch go.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  16. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 00:26:10 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    >> On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >>
    >>> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >>> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >>> your wants & needs.

    >>
    >> Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    >> seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    >> about over fallen logs. LOL :p

    >
    > If things in my life fell into place the right way, I could easily get
    > into randonneuring. All I'd need is a rich guy to adopt me and call me
    > "Young Man", a la "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    > something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would be built for
    > relentlessly continuing along highways & byways, and have everything
    > necessary to keep going all day and all night, in lots of different
    > weather/lighting conditions.


    The internet is sure to help you find such an arrangement. Somewhere in
    cyberspace is a patron just waiting for you! He wears a handlebar
    moustache, knee britches, shifts with a crooked index finger upon the
    chain, and will certainly be loaded with cash to spend on toeclips,
    brioche, and cream sherry. :p

    > The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/. How apropos for a
    > morning commute bike.
    >
    > The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in canada, and
    > rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa Randonneur.
    >


    Gorgeous stuff. The only institution down here is a For F-150.

    > When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    > wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked Norco Bigfoot,
    > with the old style canti brakes 'n all. 'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is
    > tough enough. And I've invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch
    > of musculature (especially in the calves) to make that weighty
    > sonofabitch go.



    Ha--I'm very aware myself on how different cycles shape my legs into
    amusingly bumpy sculptures that very from year to year. LOL I'd have to
    substitute my long gone '85 Shogun Prairie Breaker for the Norco if I was
    to do a tour of the Icelandic thermals.
     
  17. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 00:26:10 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    >> On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >>
    >>> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >>> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >>> your wants & needs.

    >>
    >> Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    >> seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    >> about over fallen logs. LOL :p

    >
    > If things in my life fell into place the right way, I could easily get
    > into randonneuring. All I'd need is a rich guy to adopt me and call me
    > "Young Man", a la "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    > something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would be built for
    > relentlessly continuing along highways & byways, and have everything
    > necessary to keep going all day and all night, in lots of different
    > weather/lighting conditions.


    The internet is sure to help you find such an arrangement. Somewhere in
    cyberspace is a patron just waiting for you! He wears a handlebar
    moustache, knee britches, shifts with a crooked index finger upon the
    chain, and will certainly be loaded with cash to spend on toeclips,
    brioche, and cream sherry. :p

    > The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/. How apropos for a
    > morning commute bike.
    >
    > The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in canada, and
    > rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa Randonneur.
    >


    Gorgeous stuff. The only institution down here is a For F-150.

    > When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    > wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked Norco Bigfoot,
    > with the old style canti brakes 'n all. 'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is
    > tough enough. And I've invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch
    > of musculature (especially in the calves) to make that weighty
    > sonofabitch go.



    Ha--I'm very aware myself on how different cycles shape my legs into
    amusingly bumpy sculptures that very from year to year. LOL I'd have to
    substitute my long gone '85 Shogun Prairie Breaker for the Norco if I was
    to do a tour of the Icelandic thermals.
     
  18. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 00:26:10 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    >> On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >>
    >>> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >>> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >>> your wants & needs.

    >>
    >> Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    >> seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    >> about over fallen logs. LOL :p

    >
    > If things in my life fell into place the right way, I could easily get
    > into randonneuring. All I'd need is a rich guy to adopt me and call me
    > "Young Man", a la "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    > something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would be built for
    > relentlessly continuing along highways & byways, and have everything
    > necessary to keep going all day and all night, in lots of different
    > weather/lighting conditions.


    The internet is sure to help you find such an arrangement. Somewhere in
    cyberspace is a patron just waiting for you! He wears a handlebar
    moustache, knee britches, shifts with a crooked index finger upon the
    chain, and will certainly be loaded with cash to spend on toeclips,
    brioche, and cream sherry. :p

    > The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/. How apropos for a
    > morning commute bike.
    >
    > The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in canada, and
    > rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa Randonneur.
    >


    Gorgeous stuff. The only institution down here is a For F-150.

    > When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    > wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked Norco Bigfoot,
    > with the old style canti brakes 'n all. 'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is
    > tough enough. And I've invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch
    > of musculature (especially in the calves) to make that weighty
    > sonofabitch go.



    Ha--I'm very aware myself on how different cycles shape my legs into
    amusingly bumpy sculptures that very from year to year. LOL I'd have to
    substitute my long gone '85 Shogun Prairie Breaker for the Norco if I was
    to do a tour of the Icelandic thermals.
     
  19. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 00:26:10 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    >> On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >>
    >>> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >>> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >>> your wants & needs.

    >>
    >> Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    >> seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    >> about over fallen logs. LOL :p

    >
    > If things in my life fell into place the right way, I could easily get
    > into randonneuring. All I'd need is a rich guy to adopt me and call me
    > "Young Man", a la "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    > something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would be built for
    > relentlessly continuing along highways & byways, and have everything
    > necessary to keep going all day and all night, in lots of different
    > weather/lighting conditions.


    The internet is sure to help you find such an arrangement. Somewhere in
    cyberspace is a patron just waiting for you! He wears a handlebar
    moustache, knee britches, shifts with a crooked index finger upon the
    chain, and will certainly be loaded with cash to spend on toeclips,
    brioche, and cream sherry. :p

    > The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/. How apropos for a
    > morning commute bike.
    >
    > The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in canada, and
    > rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa Randonneur.
    >


    Gorgeous stuff. The only institution down here is a For F-150.

    > When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    > wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked Norco Bigfoot,
    > with the old style canti brakes 'n all. 'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is
    > tough enough. And I've invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch
    > of musculature (especially in the calves) to make that weighty
    > sonofabitch go.



    Ha--I'm very aware myself on how different cycles shape my legs into
    amusingly bumpy sculptures that very from year to year. LOL I'd have to
    substitute my long gone '85 Shogun Prairie Breaker for the Norco if I was
    to do a tour of the Icelandic thermals.
     
  20. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 00:26:10 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    >> On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 20:35:00 -0700, Tom Keats wrote:
    >>
    >>> I note cyclocross bikes have been mentioned a
    >>> lot, but I think those things come with a lot of unnecessary specs for
    >>> your wants & needs.

    >>
    >> Very true. A lot, though, like the Surly Cross-Check and Bianchi Volpe,
    >> seem designed more for randonneuring than for loony Englishmen to tote
    >> about over fallen logs. LOL :p

    >
    > If things in my life fell into place the right way, I could easily get
    > into randonneuring. All I'd need is a rich guy to adopt me and call me
    > "Young Man", a la "Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    > something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would be built for
    > relentlessly continuing along highways & byways, and have everything
    > necessary to keep going all day and all night, in lots of different
    > weather/lighting conditions.


    The internet is sure to help you find such an arrangement. Somewhere in
    cyberspace is a patron just waiting for you! He wears a handlebar
    moustache, knee britches, shifts with a crooked index finger upon the
    chain, and will certainly be loaded with cash to spend on toeclips,
    brioche, and cream sherry. :p

    > The thing about Surly is, I just like the /name/. How apropos for a
    > morning commute bike.
    >
    > The (steel) Marinoni Turismo is an Institution up here in canada, and
    > rightly & deservedly so. So is the Mariposa Randonneur.
    >


    Gorgeous stuff. The only institution down here is a For F-150.

    > When I eventually do Iceland, I'm gonna do it on my old,
    > wide-handlebar'd, hi-tens-framed, 6-spd, rigid-forked Norco Bigfoot,
    > with the old style canti brakes 'n all. 'Cuz I /know/ that ol' beast is
    > tough enough. And I've invested a lot of effort into developing a bunch
    > of musculature (especially in the calves) to make that weighty
    > sonofabitch go.



    Ha--I'm very aware myself on how different cycles shape my legs into
    amusingly bumpy sculptures that very from year to year. LOL I'd have to
    substitute my long gone '85 Shogun Prairie Breaker for the Norco if I was
    to do a tour of the Icelandic thermals.
     
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