Opinions on versatile bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fred Barney, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    >MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    >consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    >about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    >steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    >potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    >road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    >of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    >that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    >roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    >a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    >b) Cyclocross
    >
    >c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    are good to go.
    -------------
    Alex
     


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    >MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    >consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    >about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    >steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    >potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    >road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    >of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    >that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    >roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    >a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    >b) Cyclocross
    >
    >c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    are good to go.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    >MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    >consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    >about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    >steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    >potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    >road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    >of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    >that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    >roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    >a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    >b) Cyclocross
    >
    >c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    are good to go.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    >MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    >consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    >about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    >steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    >potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    >road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    >of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    >that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    >roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    >a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    >b) Cyclocross
    >
    >c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    are good to go.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    >MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap. My rides
    >consist mostly of about 50 miles (80k) over very hilly terrain with
    >about 2500' (750m) of total climbing. The grades are mostly short but
    >steep. The MTB (with slicks) can deal with anything like dirt roads and
    >potholes, but it is heavy and not very good for standing up. With the
    >road racer I have to be picky about the road surface, cutting out a lot
    >of otherwise nice routes. I need a bike that is reasonably light and
    >that can fit decent sized tires for rougher surfaces and occasional dirt
    >roads. I'm thinking:
    >
    >a) A fully rigid MTB with slicks
    >
    >b) Cyclocross
    >
    >c) Sport touring along the lines of a Rivendell Rambouillet


    Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    are good to go.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  6. rdclark

    rdclark Guest

    Fred Barney wrote:
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap.


    It sounds to me like you really want to buy a third bike, rather than
    modify an existing one.

    And your description of the requirements for this bike appear to me to
    be written with the image of a cyclocross bike in your mind's eye.

    If you're looking for confirmation, I don't think you need it. But
    yeah, buy a 'cross bike. In fact, get Habanero or Airborne to build you
    a ti 'cross bike that will use up your budget and yield a reasonably
    light, comfortable, versatile road/dirt machine that you can later turn
    into a touring bike or commuter witout much modification (if any). (My
    4-year old Airborne Carpe Diem has been a joy.)

    RichC
     
  7. rdclark

    rdclark Guest

    Fred Barney wrote:
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap.


    It sounds to me like you really want to buy a third bike, rather than
    modify an existing one.

    And your description of the requirements for this bike appear to me to
    be written with the image of a cyclocross bike in your mind's eye.

    If you're looking for confirmation, I don't think you need it. But
    yeah, buy a 'cross bike. In fact, get Habanero or Airborne to build you
    a ti 'cross bike that will use up your budget and yield a reasonably
    light, comfortable, versatile road/dirt machine that you can later turn
    into a touring bike or commuter witout much modification (if any). (My
    4-year old Airborne Carpe Diem has been a joy.)

    RichC
     
  8. rdclark

    rdclark Guest

    Fred Barney wrote:
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap.


    It sounds to me like you really want to buy a third bike, rather than
    modify an existing one.

    And your description of the requirements for this bike appear to me to
    be written with the image of a cyclocross bike in your mind's eye.

    If you're looking for confirmation, I don't think you need it. But
    yeah, buy a 'cross bike. In fact, get Habanero or Airborne to build you
    a ti 'cross bike that will use up your budget and yield a reasonably
    light, comfortable, versatile road/dirt machine that you can later turn
    into a touring bike or commuter witout much modification (if any). (My
    4-year old Airborne Carpe Diem has been a joy.)

    RichC
     
  9. rdclark

    rdclark Guest

    Fred Barney wrote:
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap.


    It sounds to me like you really want to buy a third bike, rather than
    modify an existing one.

    And your description of the requirements for this bike appear to me to
    be written with the image of a cyclocross bike in your mind's eye.

    If you're looking for confirmation, I don't think you need it. But
    yeah, buy a 'cross bike. In fact, get Habanero or Airborne to build you
    a ti 'cross bike that will use up your budget and yield a reasonably
    light, comfortable, versatile road/dirt machine that you can later turn
    into a touring bike or commuter witout much modification (if any). (My
    4-year old Airborne Carpe Diem has been a joy.)

    RichC
     
  10. rdclark

    rdclark Guest

    Fred Barney wrote:
    > I'm researching my next bike purchase. I already have a fully suspended
    > MTB and a road racer, but I want something to fill the gap.


    It sounds to me like you really want to buy a third bike, rather than
    modify an existing one.

    And your description of the requirements for this bike appear to me to
    be written with the image of a cyclocross bike in your mind's eye.

    If you're looking for confirmation, I don't think you need it. But
    yeah, buy a 'cross bike. In fact, get Habanero or Airborne to build you
    a ti 'cross bike that will use up your budget and yield a reasonably
    light, comfortable, versatile road/dirt machine that you can later turn
    into a touring bike or commuter witout much modification (if any). (My
    4-year old Airborne Carpe Diem has been a joy.)

    RichC
     
  11. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:
    >
    >> How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    >> have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    >> best choice.

    >
    >There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.


    _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    worse.

    >
    >But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    >the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.
    >


    _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire
    clearances don't always go together very well. While most road
    bikes can fit a 25mm tire, they don't leave enough clearance if
    gravel gets stuck in the tread or for any mud at all. While I
    agree that you can take a road bike with 25mm many more places
    than most people are willing to try. If you are going to mostly
    ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for fenders are pretty
    handy. You can get this with either a 'cross bike, a sport
    touring bike or a mtb with a rigid fork and slicks.
    Pick the one that you like riding the most. Personally, I
    own one of each.

    _ Fat slick tires can be addictive, once you get rid of the knobs
    you realize that fat tires aren't much slower ( just heavier )
    and a lot more comfortable.

    _ Booker C. Bense



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  12. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:
    >
    >> How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    >> have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    >> best choice.

    >
    >There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.


    _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    worse.

    >
    >But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    >the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.
    >


    _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire
    clearances don't always go together very well. While most road
    bikes can fit a 25mm tire, they don't leave enough clearance if
    gravel gets stuck in the tread or for any mud at all. While I
    agree that you can take a road bike with 25mm many more places
    than most people are willing to try. If you are going to mostly
    ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for fenders are pretty
    handy. You can get this with either a 'cross bike, a sport
    touring bike or a mtb with a rigid fork and slicks.
    Pick the one that you like riding the most. Personally, I
    own one of each.

    _ Fat slick tires can be addictive, once you get rid of the knobs
    you realize that fat tires aren't much slower ( just heavier )
    and a lot more comfortable.

    _ Booker C. Bense



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  13. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:
    >
    >> How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    >> have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    >> best choice.

    >
    >There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.


    _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    worse.

    >
    >But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    >the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.
    >


    _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire
    clearances don't always go together very well. While most road
    bikes can fit a 25mm tire, they don't leave enough clearance if
    gravel gets stuck in the tread or for any mud at all. While I
    agree that you can take a road bike with 25mm many more places
    than most people are willing to try. If you are going to mostly
    ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for fenders are pretty
    handy. You can get this with either a 'cross bike, a sport
    touring bike or a mtb with a rigid fork and slicks.
    Pick the one that you like riding the most. Personally, I
    own one of each.

    _ Fat slick tires can be addictive, once you get rid of the knobs
    you realize that fat tires aren't much slower ( just heavier )
    and a lot more comfortable.

    _ Booker C. Bense



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  14. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Mon, 25 Jul 2005 17:43:24 -0500, Fred Barney wrote:
    >
    >> How about a dirt road with a 1/2 mile 20% downhill grade? I already
    >> have road bike and I only use 25's. I love it, but it isn't always the
    >> best choice.

    >
    >There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.


    _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    worse.

    >
    >But a 20% grade will simply not last that long, so it really should not be
    >the deciding factor in the bike choice, no matter what surface.
    >


    _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire
    clearances don't always go together very well. While most road
    bikes can fit a 25mm tire, they don't leave enough clearance if
    gravel gets stuck in the tread or for any mud at all. While I
    agree that you can take a road bike with 25mm many more places
    than most people are willing to try. If you are going to mostly
    ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for fenders are pretty
    handy. You can get this with either a 'cross bike, a sport
    touring bike or a mtb with a rigid fork and slicks.
    Pick the one that you like riding the most. Personally, I
    own one of each.

    _ Fat slick tires can be addictive, once you get rid of the knobs
    you realize that fat tires aren't much slower ( just heavier )
    and a lot more comfortable.

    _ Booker C. Bense



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  15. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    >
    >Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    >bike such as Bruce Gordon model?
    >
    >I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    >myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    >tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    >Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    >I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    >aren't the answer
    >
    >I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    >put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    >use it for abt anything?


    - - Yes, Rivendell makes one and so does Surly[1], Thorn and
    quite a few others. If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    thing on the cheap....

    _ Booker C. Bense

    [1]- Long Haul Trucker in sizes 54 and under...

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  16. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    >
    >Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    >bike such as Bruce Gordon model?
    >
    >I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    >myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    >tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    >Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    >I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    >aren't the answer
    >
    >I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    >put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    >use it for abt anything?


    - - Yes, Rivendell makes one and so does Surly[1], Thorn and
    quite a few others. If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    thing on the cheap....

    _ Booker C. Bense

    [1]- Long Haul Trucker in sizes 54 and under...

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  17. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    >
    >Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    >bike such as Bruce Gordon model?
    >
    >I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    >myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    >tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    >Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    >I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    >aren't the answer
    >
    >I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    >put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    >use it for abt anything?


    - - Yes, Rivendell makes one and so does Surly[1], Thorn and
    quite a few others. If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    thing on the cheap....

    _ Booker C. Bense

    [1]- Long Haul Trucker in sizes 54 and under...

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  18. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    >
    >Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    >bike such as Bruce Gordon model?
    >
    >I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    >myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    >tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    >Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    >I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    >aren't the answer
    >
    >I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    >put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    >use it for abt anything?


    - - Yes, Rivendell makes one and so does Surly[1], Thorn and
    quite a few others. If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    thing on the cheap....

    _ Booker C. Bense

    [1]- Long Haul Trucker in sizes 54 and under...

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  19. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Maybe something like a Surly Pacer

    >
    >Rather than a cross bike.....why not just use a touring
    >bike such as Bruce Gordon model?
    >
    >I'm asking rhetorically as I've faced same dilemma
    >myself. I mainly commute on my bike. But wish to do a
    >tour someday. Hence the indecision on what to buy.
    >Should it be a mt bike? A cross bike? A touring bike?
    >I can only afford to own ONE good bike so multiples
    >aren't the answer
    >
    >I just wonder if you could buy a true touring bike and
    >put a set of 26" wheel and heavy duty tires on it. And
    >use it for abt anything?


    - - Yes, Rivendell makes one and so does Surly[1], Thorn and
    quite a few others. If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    thing on the cheap....

    _ Booker C. Bense

    [1]- Long Haul Trucker in sizes 54 and under...

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  20. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 18:16:00 +0000, Booker C. Bense wrote:

    >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    > _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    > hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    > worse.


    Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    surfaces.

    > _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire clearances
    > don't always go together very well. While most road bikes can fit a 25mm
    > tire, they don't leave enough clearance if gravel gets stuck in the
    > tread or for any mud at all. While I agree that you can take a road bike
    > with 25mm many more places than most people are willing to try. If you
    > are going to mostly ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for
    > fenders are pretty handy.


    Agreed, but again not the original idea in this thread.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all
    _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so
    (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am
    nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
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