Opinions on versatile bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fred Barney, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 18:16:00 +0000, Booker C. Bense wrote:

    >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    > _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    > hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    > worse.


    Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    surfaces.

    > _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire clearances
    > don't always go together very well. While most road bikes can fit a 25mm
    > tire, they don't leave enough clearance if gravel gets stuck in the
    > tread or for any mud at all. While I agree that you can take a road bike
    > with 25mm many more places than most people are willing to try. If you
    > are going to mostly ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for
    > fenders are pretty handy.


    Agreed, but again not the original idea in this thread.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all
    _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so
    (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am
    nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     


  2. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 18:16:00 +0000, Booker C. Bense wrote:

    >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    > _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    > hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    > worse.


    Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    surfaces.

    > _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire clearances
    > don't always go together very well. While most road bikes can fit a 25mm
    > tire, they don't leave enough clearance if gravel gets stuck in the
    > tread or for any mud at all. While I agree that you can take a road bike
    > with 25mm many more places than most people are willing to try. If you
    > are going to mostly ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for
    > fenders are pretty handy.


    Agreed, but again not the original idea in this thread.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all
    _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so
    (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am
    nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  3. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 18:16:00 +0000, Booker C. Bense wrote:

    >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    > _ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    > hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    > worse.


    Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    surfaces.

    > _ The other thing to consider is that gravel and tight tire clearances
    > don't always go together very well. While most road bikes can fit a 25mm
    > tire, they don't leave enough clearance if gravel gets stuck in the
    > tread or for any mud at all. While I agree that you can take a road bike
    > with 25mm many more places than most people are willing to try. If you
    > are going to mostly ride dirt roads, wider tires and clearance for
    > fenders are pretty handy.


    Agreed, but again not the original idea in this thread.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all
    _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so
    (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am
    nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  4. > If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    >rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    >thing on the cheap....


    really?

    why a late 80s model?
     
  5. > If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    >rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    >thing on the cheap....


    really?

    why a late 80s model?
     
  6. > If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    >rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    >thing on the cheap....


    really?

    why a late 80s model?
     
  7. > If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    >rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    >thing on the cheap....


    really?

    why a late 80s model?
     
  8. > If you take a late 80's MTB with a
    >rigid fork and put drop bars on it you can get the same
    >thing on the cheap....


    really?

    why a late 80s model?
     
  9. >If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    >could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    >a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    >"Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    >something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    >be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    >byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    >day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    >conditions.


    Question....

    Do you guys think that bents might be better idea for
    long touring?
     
  10. >If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    >could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    >a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    >"Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    >something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    >be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    >byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    >day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    >conditions.


    Question....

    Do you guys think that bents might be better idea for
    long touring?
     
  11. >If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    >could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    >a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    >"Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    >something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    >be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    >byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    >day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    >conditions.


    Question....

    Do you guys think that bents might be better idea for
    long touring?
     
  12. >If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    >could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    >a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    >"Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    >something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    >be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    >byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    >day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    >conditions.


    Question....

    Do you guys think that bents might be better idea for
    long touring?
     
  13. >If things in my life fell into place the right way, I
    >could easily get into randonneuring. All I'd need is
    >a rich guy to adopt me and call me "Young Man", a la
    >"Magic Christian". And the bike I'd want wouldn't be
    >something to loonily heave-ho over fallen logs; it would
    >be built for relentlessly continuing along highways &
    >byways, and have everything necessary to keep going all
    >day and all night, in lots of different weather/lighting
    >conditions.


    Question....

    Do you guys think that bents might be better idea for
    long touring?
     
  14. >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    >_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >worse.


    If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    one get a bike with disk brakes?

    I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask
     
  15. >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    >_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >worse.


    If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    one get a bike with disk brakes?

    I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask
     
  16. >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    >_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >worse.


    If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    one get a bike with disk brakes?

    I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask
     
  17. >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    >_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >worse.


    If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    one get a bike with disk brakes?

    I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask
     
  18. >>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >
    >_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >worse.


    If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    one get a bike with disk brakes?

    I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask
     
  19. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 16:37:19 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >>>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >>
    >>_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >>hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >>worse.

    >
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?
    >
    >I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask


    Dear Me,

    Dear, me, no!

    Despite inflated claims, 20% (and steeper) grades on public
    roads are quite unusual anywhere in the U.S.

    Dirt roads (as opposed to trails and 4-wheel-drive tracks)
    are even less likely to have any significant stretches at
    20% grade or steeper.

    Without extensive drainage work, such roads would erode
    severely as soon as rain fell in the forests mentioned.

    When wet, even well-drained dirt roads that steep would also
    be well-nigh impassable for ordinary traffic.

    On the internet, steepness is often exaggerated.

    Here's a site where you can see over seven thousand European
    bicycle climbs, few of which exceed 20% grade for even short
    stretches:

    http://www.salite.ch/struttura/default.asp?Ultime=3

    The lack of this kind of methodical mapping of bicycle
    routes can lead to all sorts of strange claims concerning
    grades.

    Recent claims in this newsgroup concerning a public road in
    Colorado, for example, appear to have drawn a straight
    1-mile path between two contour lines on a topo map and
    calculated the grade on that basis--even though the actual
    road, clearly visible twisting on the map, was over 2 miles
    long.

    Carl Fogel
     
  20. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 16:37:19 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >>>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >>
    >>_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >>hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >>worse.

    >
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?
    >
    >I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask


    Dear Me,

    Dear, me, no!

    Despite inflated claims, 20% (and steeper) grades on public
    roads are quite unusual anywhere in the U.S.

    Dirt roads (as opposed to trails and 4-wheel-drive tracks)
    are even less likely to have any significant stretches at
    20% grade or steeper.

    Without extensive drainage work, such roads would erode
    severely as soon as rain fell in the forests mentioned.

    When wet, even well-drained dirt roads that steep would also
    be well-nigh impassable for ordinary traffic.

    On the internet, steepness is often exaggerated.

    Here's a site where you can see over seven thousand European
    bicycle climbs, few of which exceed 20% grade for even short
    stretches:

    http://www.salite.ch/struttura/default.asp?Ultime=3

    The lack of this kind of methodical mapping of bicycle
    routes can lead to all sorts of strange claims concerning
    grades.

    Recent claims in this newsgroup concerning a public road in
    Colorado, for example, appear to have drawn a straight
    1-mile path between two contour lines on a topo map and
    calculated the grade on that basis--even though the actual
    road, clearly visible twisting on the map, was over 2 miles
    long.

    Carl Fogel
     
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