Opinions on versatile bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fred Barney, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 16:37:19 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >>>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >>
    >>_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >>hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >>worse.

    >
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?
    >
    >I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask


    Dear Me,

    Dear, me, no!

    Despite inflated claims, 20% (and steeper) grades on public
    roads are quite unusual anywhere in the U.S.

    Dirt roads (as opposed to trails and 4-wheel-drive tracks)
    are even less likely to have any significant stretches at
    20% grade or steeper.

    Without extensive drainage work, such roads would erode
    severely as soon as rain fell in the forests mentioned.

    When wet, even well-drained dirt roads that steep would also
    be well-nigh impassable for ordinary traffic.

    On the internet, steepness is often exaggerated.

    Here's a site where you can see over seven thousand European
    bicycle climbs, few of which exceed 20% grade for even short
    stretches:

    http://www.salite.ch/struttura/default.asp?Ultime=3

    The lack of this kind of methodical mapping of bicycle
    routes can lead to all sorts of strange claims concerning
    grades.

    Recent claims in this newsgroup concerning a public road in
    Colorado, for example, appear to have drawn a straight
    1-mile path between two contour lines on a topo map and
    calculated the grade on that basis--even though the actual
    road, clearly visible twisting on the map, was over 2 miles
    long.

    Carl Fogel
     


  2. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 16:37:19 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >>>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >>
    >>_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >>hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >>worse.

    >
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?
    >
    >I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask


    Dear Me,

    Dear, me, no!

    Despite inflated claims, 20% (and steeper) grades on public
    roads are quite unusual anywhere in the U.S.

    Dirt roads (as opposed to trails and 4-wheel-drive tracks)
    are even less likely to have any significant stretches at
    20% grade or steeper.

    Without extensive drainage work, such roads would erode
    severely as soon as rain fell in the forests mentioned.

    When wet, even well-drained dirt roads that steep would also
    be well-nigh impassable for ordinary traffic.

    On the internet, steepness is often exaggerated.

    Here's a site where you can see over seven thousand European
    bicycle climbs, few of which exceed 20% grade for even short
    stretches:

    http://www.salite.ch/struttura/default.asp?Ultime=3

    The lack of this kind of methodical mapping of bicycle
    routes can lead to all sorts of strange claims concerning
    grades.

    Recent claims in this newsgroup concerning a public road in
    Colorado, for example, appear to have drawn a straight
    1-mile path between two contour lines on a topo map and
    calculated the grade on that basis--even though the actual
    road, clearly visible twisting on the map, was over 2 miles
    long.

    Carl Fogel
     
  3. On Tue, 26 Jul 2005 16:37:19 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >>>There simply are not that many dirt roads with 20% grades. The OP did not
    >>>indicate anything like that, just poor road surfaces.

    >>
    >>_ You don't get out west much do you? There are hundred and
    >>hundreds of miles of forest roads with grades like that or
    >>worse.

    >
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?
    >
    >I live in Missouri.... the flat part. That's why I ask


    Dear Me,

    Dear, me, no!

    Despite inflated claims, 20% (and steeper) grades on public
    roads are quite unusual anywhere in the U.S.

    Dirt roads (as opposed to trails and 4-wheel-drive tracks)
    are even less likely to have any significant stretches at
    20% grade or steeper.

    Without extensive drainage work, such roads would erode
    severely as soon as rain fell in the forests mentioned.

    When wet, even well-drained dirt roads that steep would also
    be well-nigh impassable for ordinary traffic.

    On the internet, steepness is often exaggerated.

    Here's a site where you can see over seven thousand European
    bicycle climbs, few of which exceed 20% grade for even short
    stretches:

    http://www.salite.ch/struttura/default.asp?Ultime=3

    The lack of this kind of methodical mapping of bicycle
    routes can lead to all sorts of strange claims concerning
    grades.

    Recent claims in this newsgroup concerning a public road in
    Colorado, for example, appear to have drawn a straight
    1-mile path between two contour lines on a topo map and
    calculated the grade on that basis--even though the actual
    road, clearly visible twisting on the map, was over 2 miles
    long.

    Carl Fogel
     
  4. Per [email protected]:
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?


    Personally, I don't see any issue of braking power in discs vs v's.

    Instead, I see modulation as the main issue.

    Based on that, it would make some diff what kind of surface the grades are.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  5. Per [email protected]:
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?


    Personally, I don't see any issue of braking power in discs vs v's.

    Instead, I see modulation as the main issue.

    Based on that, it would make some diff what kind of surface the grades are.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  6. Per [email protected]:
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?


    Personally, I don't see any issue of braking power in discs vs v's.

    Instead, I see modulation as the main issue.

    Based on that, it would make some diff what kind of surface the grades are.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  7. Per [email protected]:
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?


    Personally, I don't see any issue of braking power in discs vs v's.

    Instead, I see modulation as the main issue.

    Based on that, it would make some diff what kind of surface the grades are.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  8. Per [email protected]:
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?


    Personally, I don't see any issue of braking power in discs vs v's.

    Instead, I see modulation as the main issue.

    Based on that, it would make some diff what kind of surface the grades are.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  9. Per [email protected]:
    >If there are that kind of grades out west..... should
    >one get a bike with disk brakes?


    Personally, I don't see any issue of braking power in discs vs v's.

    Instead, I see modulation as the main issue.

    Based on that, it would make some diff what kind of surface the grades are.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  10. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    Alex Rodriguez says...

    > Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    > are good to go.
    > -------------
    > Alex


    No way. It's a Six13. I want to go to about a 37.
     
  11. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    Alex Rodriguez says...

    > Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    > are good to go.
    > -------------
    > Alex


    No way. It's a Six13. I want to go to about a 37.
     
  12. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    Alex Rodriguez says...

    > Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    > are good to go.
    > -------------
    > Alex


    No way. It's a Six13. I want to go to about a 37.
     
  13. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    Alex Rodriguez says...

    > Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    > are good to go.
    > -------------
    > Alex


    No way. It's a Six13. I want to go to about a 37.
     
  14. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    Alex Rodriguez says...

    > Put some cross tires on your racing bike, assuming they will fit, and you
    > are good to go.
    > -------------
    > Alex


    No way. It's a Six13. I want to go to about a 37.
     
  15. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    > other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    > about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    > surfaces.


    Well, I may not have been all that clear in my original post, but the
    gravel patches I encounter are usually at least a mile long. Long,
    steep downhill grades are very common. If I'm exploring a new route,
    just about any otherwise nice country road can abruptly turn into dirt.
    When that happens, it is either go through it or go back. Going back
    can mean either ending the ride early, or adding lots of grueling miles
    to it. I live in southern Indiana BTW. Once you get off the main
    roads, it gets very remote in a hurry.
     
  16. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    > other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    > about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    > surfaces.


    Well, I may not have been all that clear in my original post, but the
    gravel patches I encounter are usually at least a mile long. Long,
    steep downhill grades are very common. If I'm exploring a new route,
    just about any otherwise nice country road can abruptly turn into dirt.
    When that happens, it is either go through it or go back. Going back
    can mean either ending the ride early, or adding lots of grueling miles
    to it. I live in southern Indiana BTW. Once you get off the main
    roads, it gets very remote in a hurry.
     
  17. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    > other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    > about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    > surfaces.


    Well, I may not have been all that clear in my original post, but the
    gravel patches I encounter are usually at least a mile long. Long,
    steep downhill grades are very common. If I'm exploring a new route,
    just about any otherwise nice country road can abruptly turn into dirt.
    When that happens, it is either go through it or go back. Going back
    can mean either ending the ride early, or adding lots of grueling miles
    to it. I live in southern Indiana BTW. Once you get off the main
    roads, it gets very remote in a hurry.
     
  18. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    > other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    > about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    > surfaces.


    Well, I may not have been all that clear in my original post, but the
    gravel patches I encounter are usually at least a mile long. Long,
    steep downhill grades are very common. If I'm exploring a new route,
    just about any otherwise nice country road can abruptly turn into dirt.
    When that happens, it is either go through it or go back. Going back
    can mean either ending the ride early, or adding lots of grueling miles
    to it. I live in southern Indiana BTW. Once you get off the main
    roads, it gets very remote in a hurry.
     
  19. Fred Barney

    Fred Barney Guest

    David L. Johnson says...

    > Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    > other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    > about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    > surfaces.


    Well, I may not have been all that clear in my original post, but the
    gravel patches I encounter are usually at least a mile long. Long,
    steep downhill grades are very common. If I'm exploring a new route,
    just about any otherwise nice country road can abruptly turn into dirt.
    When that happens, it is either go through it or go back. Going back
    can mean either ending the ride early, or adding lots of grueling miles
    to it. I live in southern Indiana BTW. Once you get off the main
    roads, it gets very remote in a hurry.
     
  20. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Fred Barney <[email protected]> writes:
    > David L. Johnson says...
    >
    >> Again, the OP was not talking about forest roads, or single track, or
    >> other situations clearly calling for an off-road bike. He was talking
    >> about occasional gravel patches, and potholes, on otherwise paved
    >> surfaces.

    >
    > Well, I may not have been all that clear in my original post, but the
    > gravel patches I encounter are usually at least a mile long. Long,
    > steep downhill grades are very common. If I'm exploring a new route,
    > just about any otherwise nice country road can abruptly turn into dirt.
    > When that happens, it is either go through it or go back. Going back
    > can mean either ending the ride early, or adding lots of grueling miles
    > to it. I live in southern Indiana BTW. Once you get off the main
    > roads, it gets very remote in a hurry.


    Okay then, look for a used 80's rigid-forked MTB, and bunny-hop with
    impunity. A well-fitting one with a relaxed geometry approaching
    that of a touring bike (the "T" in MTB stands for 'touring' anyways)
    rather than something short 'n twitchy. 50-milers on such a bike are
    trivial and easy to take, so long as you're not too concerned about
    speed. Maybe go a little wide on the handlebar -- wide handlebars
    are lovely on steep slopes. A pair of those inverted-tread MTB tires
    might be just the ticket for your varied-but-not-extreme riding
    surfaces. And if you have to deal with egg gravel, I think you'll
    appreciate fatter/lower pressure tires more than anything on a
    road[ish] bike. Some clicky top-mount shifters, a good mix of Exage
    and Sugino, swap in a steel 24" granny ring to replace the ubiquitous,
    stock 26" one, and yer sittin' pretty.

    My mind's eye is picturing an old Diamondback ...


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
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