opinions? - Trek 1000

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dhananjay Adhik, Feb 10, 2004.

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  1. Hi,

    I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than the
    bike shop.

    Thanks, D
     
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  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    > thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    > have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    > Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than
    > the bike shop.

    Fuji also has a nice entry-level road bike with Sora, STI shifters, dropbars, etc. About $459 IIRC.
    They also have a $360 model, but it has downtube shifters, which practically nobody wants.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  3. Alan Acock

    Alan Acock Guest

    When you buy a new bicycle you are buying a relationship with the bicycle shop. Check them out in
    terms of how they treat you and others and who is doing repair work--a kid with a couple weeks
    training or an experience mechanic.

    Bikes within a price range are roughly comparable, bicycles vary widely.

    Alan Acock "Dhananjay Adhikari" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    > thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    > have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    > Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than
    > the bike shop.
    >
    > Thanks, D
     
  4. Yuri Budilov

    Yuri Budilov Guest

    I bought Trek 1000, 2004 model, early in January 2004..... i.e. about 5 weeks ago....

    Too early to tell as I have only managed to ride about 250 km on it since I bought it but early
    signs are pretty good for the money.

    I upgraded the tyres to the Michelin Kevlar-lined puncture resistant tyres but otherwise it is
    standard Trek 1000. I even managed to fall off (my fault) and the bike ended up in a better shape
    than its owner, nothing broke on either one of us, but I was badly bruised.

    But I do hate the standard Trek 1000 pedals (with toe clip straps) so I took those straps off last
    week and been riding "bare pedals" instead - and with better average speed too. I am most likely I
    will get clip-less pedals for it soon. I suggest you stay "bare" or better go clip-less. This means
    buying shoes and special pedals. On more expensive bikes you might get those included, I guess..

    So do realise you are buying a pretty decent road bike but it is only an entry level bike. You get
    what you pay for, in general.

    "Dhananjay Adhikari" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    > thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    > have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    > Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than
    > the bike shop.
    >
    > Thanks, D
     
  5. Dale Pollard

    Dale Pollard Guest

    Dhanjay, I love my Trek 1000! I just bought it in mid October, however, the season ended way to
    soon. As an entry level rider with limited finances it was the best bang for the buck. For the price
    I paid it was an even better deal. The Shimano Sora shifter are entry level but still compatible
    with the Flight Deck (computer) should you choose to buy it extra. It includes Bontrager rims and
    handlebars. Also it has a stiff, lightweight frame. I don't know what else to say. Oh, just make
    sure you check out all you "riding" options. Enjoy the picture!

    DP "Dhananjay Adhikari" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    > thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    > have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    > Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than
    > the bike shop.
    >
    > Thanks, D
     
  6. Attention Dhanjay and Dale, which I thought knew better, no binaries in this ng. It wastes bandwidth
    when a simple URL would do, and it really just isn't done. Thank you very much for your cooperation.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  7. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 19:05:00 -0500, Dhananjay Adhikari <[email protected]>
    from Purdue University wrote:

    >I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    >thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    >have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    >Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than the
    >bike shop.

    At that price, you could get a really keen fixed-gear bike brand new from Bianchi. That's stylin'!
    It's a more pure ride than something with gears, too.

    --
    [email protected]
    Turn it upside down.
    5
     
  8. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Dhananjay Adhikari wrote:

    > I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    > thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    > have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    > Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than
    > the bike shop.

    The place you buy it is more important than the bike itself, especially if you're new to the sport.
    There are dozens (at least) of bikes virtually identical to the Trek 1000 -- drop-bar bikes with
    Shimano Sora -- and they're all within a few dollars of each other. So find a dealer that will give
    you the best fit and post-sale service, a dealer you'll have the best long term relationship with.

    If you've been riding for years, and you know all about bikes, then, and only then, can you afford
    to be ruthless about price.

    Other than that, Trek has a reputation for the best warranty service in the industry, so you can't
    go wrong with a Trek, Lemond, Fisher, or Klein. (They're all made by Trek).

    Matt O.
     
  9. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I bought Trek 1000, 2004 model, early in January 2004..... i.e. about 5 weeks ago....
    >
    > Too early to tell as I have only managed to ride about 250 km on it since I bought it but early
    > signs are pretty good for the money.
    >
    > I upgraded the tyres to the Michelin Kevlar-lined puncture resistant tyres but otherwise it is
    > standard Trek 1000. I even managed to fall off (my fault) and the bike ended up in a better shape
    > than its owner, nothing broke on either one of us, but I was badly bruised.
    >
    > But I do hate the standard Trek 1000 pedals (with toe clip straps) so I took those straps off last
    > week and been riding "bare pedals" instead - and with better average speed too. I am most likely I
    > will get clip-less pedals for it soon. I suggest you stay "bare" or better go clip-less. This
    > means buying

    I would disagree with this; for me, toe clips are better than nothing, though not as good as
    clipless. Everybody's different, though.

    ....

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  10. Rocketman

    Rocketman Guest

    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I
    looked
    > > at a Trek 1000 and was thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering
    > > if people on this group have some opinions on it.
    I
    > > would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    Trek
    > > 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy
    it
    > > from rather than the bike shop.
    >
    > Fuji also has a nice entry-level road bike with Sora, STI shifters, dropbars, etc. About $459
    > IIRC. They also have a $360 model, but it has downtube shifters, which practically nobody wants.

    The Fuji Finest is a *great* bike for the money. Sora works very well, and 24 speeds is more than
    enough. I had the beautiful blue/white 2002 model with 4130 butted CrMo frame/fork and mostly
    Cyclone/CRP components. I recommend the bike highly. The Finest AL has an aluminum frame, and is
    more than a pound lighter; but honestly, I don't think it's going to make a huge difference in
    speed. The CrMo frame even has rack and fender eyelets, so you can use it as a commuter bike. How
    many road bikes have that kind of versatility these days? Almost none.

    For entry-level bikes, the Fuji Finest is my pick. Can't beat the price/performance.

    Rocketman
     
  11. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s02>, [email protected] says...

    ...

    > For entry-level bikes, the Fuji Finest is my pick. Can't beat the price/performance.

    I finally got around to looking them up, and the two models I was referring to are the ones just
    below the Finest: the Ace has Sora STI's for about $450 on my LBS's floor, and the League has D/T
    shifters for about $360.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  12. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    [Dhananjay Adhikari asked about buying a Trek 1000.]

    Dhananjay, I have a Trek 1000 (my commuter) and an older steel frame with a mix of 105 and Ultegra
    components, and I've rode bikes with Tiagra. The Sora group on the 1000 is fine, but you may want to
    spend the extra cash to get a bike with a Tiagra group (the next level up from Sora) if you can.

    Shifting on Tiagra is noticably better. Shifting up on the front chainring especially is extremely
    clunky with the Sora. The thumb shifters aren't a problem for me, but some people find them to be
    cumbersome.

    If you want to upgrade in the future, the 9-speed Tiagra is more upgradable than the 8-speed Sora.
    With Sora, you can't do it piecemeal -- the 8-speed components are not at all compatible with the
    9-speed world.

    There's a world of difference in reliability between my (mostly) 105 bike and my Sora-equipped Trek.
    I don't know how Tiagra would compare in this department.

    These are engineering compromises to keep the cost low rather than real pitfalls. If the
    shortcomings aren't that important to you then Sora will work just fine. Be sure to go for more than
    a spin in the parking lot -- work the levers and get the feel for the bike. Keep in mind that if
    something is just mildly annoying in your short test ride, that mild annoyance will be magnified
    manyfold during a three-hour ride.

    When I test rode my Trek 1000, for example, I noticed the front-chainring clunkiness but I thought
    it'll just be a commuter, I won't be using the front derailer much, and I can compensate. (I have 3
    rings, and the small ring helps on steep hills on my commute). I bike commute about 200
    miles/month, and because of that stupid clunky front derailer I now wish I had gotten a Tiagra
    equipped bike instead.

    RFM
     
  13. Toravir

    Toravir Guest

    Hi Dhananjay, I would second the fact that fit is the first most important factor and you would get
    that only in a good bike shop - so do talk to people in the area and find out about the local bike
    shops and go for the one that does the fitting best.

    Trek is like the IBM in road bikes - you cannot go wrong with them. i am a recent owner of a trek
    2100. although i started out looking at 1500 first then looked at 2300 and finally settled for 2100.

    happy riding, ravi

    [email protected] (Fritz M) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [Dhananjay Adhikari asked about buying a Trek 1000.]
    >
    > Dhananjay, I have a Trek 1000 (my commuter) and an older steel frame with a mix of 105 and
    > Ultegra components, and I've rode bikes with Tiagra. The Sora group on the 1000 is fine, but you
    > may want to spend the extra cash to get a bike with a Tiagra group (the next level up from Sora)
    > if you can.
    >
    > Shifting on Tiagra is noticably better. Shifting up on the front chainring especially is extremely
    > clunky with the Sora. The thumb shifters aren't a problem for me, but some people find them to be
    > cumbersome.
    >
    > If you want to upgrade in the future, the 9-speed Tiagra is more upgradable than the 8-speed Sora.
    > With Sora, you can't do it piecemeal -- the 8-speed components are not at all compatible with the
    > 9-speed world.
    >
    > There's a world of difference in reliability between my (mostly) 105 bike and my Sora-equipped
    > Trek. I don't know how Tiagra would compare in this department.
    >
    > These are engineering compromises to keep the cost low rather than real pitfalls. If the
    > shortcomings aren't that important to you then Sora will work just fine. Be sure to go for more
    > than a spin in the parking lot -- work the levers and get the feel for the bike. Keep in mind that
    > if something is just mildly annoying in your short test ride, that mild annoyance will be
    > magnified manyfold during a three-hour ride.
    >
    > When I test rode my Trek 1000, for example, I noticed the front-chainring clunkiness but I thought
    > it'll just be a commuter, I won't be using the front derailer much, and I can compensate. (I have
    > 3 rings, and the small ring helps on steep hills on my commute). I bike commute about 200
    > miles/month, and because of that stupid clunky front derailer I now wish I had gotten a Tiagra
    > equipped bike instead.
    >
    > RFM
     
  14. Yuri Budilov

    Yuri Budilov Guest

    I am told Giant is good value for a "name brand" and appear to be on par with Trek.... Check out
    Giant OCR-3 for a little less money than Trek 1000.... Or OCR-2 for a little more money than
    Trek 1000....

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Dhananjay Adhikari wrote:
    >
    > > I am looking for an entry level road bike to start in the sport. I looked at a Trek 1000 and was
    > > thinking of buying it. I read some reviews on the web but was wondering if people on this group
    > > have some opinions on it. I would appreciate it if anyone has other bike suggestions in place of
    > > Trek 1000 [$569 at local bike shop] or suggestions on a better place to buy it from rather than
    > > the bike shop.
    >
    > The place you buy it is more important than the bike itself, especially if you're new to the
    > sport. There are dozens (at least) of bikes virtually identical to the Trek 1000 -- drop-bar bikes
    > with Shimano Sora -- and
    they're
    > all within a few dollars of each other. So find a dealer that will give
    you the
    > best fit and post-sale service, a dealer you'll have the best long term relationship with.
    >
    > If you've been riding for years, and you know all about bikes, then, and
    only
    > then, can you afford to be ruthless about price.
    >
    > Other than that, Trek has a reputation for the best warranty service in
    the
    > industry, so you can't go wrong with a Trek, Lemond, Fisher, or Klein.
    (They're
    > all made by Trek).
    >
    > Matt O.
     
  15. toravir <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Trek is like the IBM in road bikes - you cannot go wrong with them.

    might wanna continue that analogy. "You can't go wrong with IBM" never said that you were buying the
    best it just meant that your failures would be more criticized if you bought something else. that
    may also be true for trek.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  16. Dane Jackson

    Dane Jackson Guest

    Yuri Budilov <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I am told Giant is good value for a "name brand" and appear to be on par with Trek.... Check out
    > Giant OCR-3 for a little less money than Trek 1000.... Or OCR-2 for a little more money than Trek
    > 1000....

    I got a lot of use out of my OCR-2. It was a fairly decent bike, though I had some problems using it
    as a commuter (no front fender mounts, not enough room to put a rear fender, can't fit larger
    tires). But overall it was a good bike. I put a lot of miles on it and enjoyed myself immensely.

    My only real hardware complaints are the shimmed seatpost creaked a lot unless I greased it
    frequently, and the handlebars only lasted about 1000 miles before they started clicking.

    Referenced in: http://tinyurl.com/24oyd

    --
    Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g I don't know everything, but I know a
    Matrix who does
     
  17. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Fritz M" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > When I test rode my Trek 1000, for example, I noticed the front-chainring clunkiness but I thought
    > it'll just be a commuter, I won't be using the front derailer much, and I can compensate. (I have
    > 3 rings, and the small ring helps on steep hills on my commute). I bike commute about 200
    > miles/month, and because of that stupid clunky front derailer I now wish I had gotten a Tiagra
    > equipped bike instead.

    Put a downtube shifter on for the front, works for Lance.

    Personally, I shift into the big ring around May, then down in November.
     
  18. On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 18:55:02 GMT, "Peter Cole"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Fritz M" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> When I test rode my Trek 1000, for example, I noticed the front-chainring clunkiness but I
    >> thought it'll just be a commuter, I won't be using the front derailer much, and I can compensate.
    >> (I have 3 rings, and the small ring helps on steep hills on my commute). I bike commute about 200
    >> miles/month, and because of that stupid clunky front derailer I now wish I had gotten a Tiagra
    >> equipped bike instead.
    >
    >Put a downtube shifter on for the front, works for Lance.
    >
    >Personally, I shift into the big ring around May, then down in November.

    So your summer pastures are less hilly than your winter ones, eh? Always thought it was the other
    way round.

    -Luigi
     
  19. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Put a downtube shifter on for the front, works for Lance.

    I have an old bike that I still ride occasionally with downtube friction levers.

    > Personally, I shift into the big ring around May, then down in November.

    I forgot to mention my Sora-equipped bike has a triple ring. For a regular double chainring, Sora
    probably works fine; I've never had problems shifting between the middle and big rings.

    RFM
     
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