OT: 3 peaks in Arctic Norway

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Alan Law, Aug 22, 2004.

  1. Alan Law

    Alan Law Guest

    I hope I may be allowed the indulgence of making this report. It is
    off-topic, both because it refers to mountains outside UK, and because the
    demands of the mountains in question go beyond the customary interpretation
    of hill-walking.

    I recently had the good fortune to complete my "3 peaks" in the north of
    Norway, being the three dominant peaks in mainland Norway north of the
    Arctic Circle. [There is also an offshore peak called Beerenberg (2,277 m)
    in Jan Mayen Island that seems to be the highest Norwegian mountain in the
    arctic---it is seldom visited. The mountains in Svalbard rise to only 1,717
    m.]

    In the order of ascent they were:

    1) Storsteinsfjellet (1,893 m)-Narvik area. Climbed on a magnificent
    winter's day in March 2001. Skis off 250 m below the summit, and a
    moderately steep snow climb to reach the final ridge. Minus 20 degrees
    Celsius at the top. This is the most alpine, but least well known, of the
    three mountains. A superb winter mountain.

    2) Suliskongen (1,907 m)---Sulitjelma area. Climbed in August 2003 with no
    views above 1,600 m on account of hill fog. There are a lot of glaciers on
    this mountain, but I found a summer route that only involved a few hundred
    metres on a glacier, which was dry and without crevasses. This hill is
    normally climbed on ski in the late spring.

    3) Jiehkkevarri (1,834 m)---Lyngen Alps. Climbed on a nice warm day in July
    2004 with a congenial group of Norwegians. This mountain lies in a very
    alpine area, but it is relatively flat-topped, and has many of the features
    of a small ice-cap. Because of crevasses a rope is essential---even, I was
    told, for ski ascents earlier in the season. Although accessible, it
    involves a start at sea-level and, allowing for significant re-ascent, it is
    a long day.

    The peaks indicated are the highest in the respective areas, but there are
    many other fine mountains in these areas. I have posted reports (currently
    unillustrated) at http://www.frostisen.com/mountain/MountainTripIndex.htm.
    Those who do not know Norway normally start in the south where there are
    many good things, and where conditions tend to be easier. People seeking
    footpaths and marked winter routes in the north of Norway are liable to be
    disappointed.

    --
    Alan Law
     
    Tags:


  2. "Alan Law" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I hope I may be allowed the indulgence of making this report. It is
    > off-topic, both because it refers to mountains outside UK, and

    because the
    > demands of the mountains in question go beyond the customary

    interpretation
    > of hill-walking.


    It's a lot more on topic than many an item that has appeared on this
    ng ;-) Always interesting to hear of other people trips and the fact
    that they are a bit different and not in the Uk doesn't matter. Nice
    report, look forward to seeing some pics
    Graham

    >
    > I recently had the good fortune to complete my "3 peaks" in the

    north of
    > Norway, being the three dominant peaks in mainland Norway north of

    the
    > Arctic Circle. [There is also an offshore peak called Beerenberg

    (2,277 m)
    > in Jan Mayen Island that seems to be the highest Norwegian mountain

    in the
    > arctic---it is seldom visited. The mountains in Svalbard rise to

    only 1,717
    > m.]
    >
    > In the order of ascent they were:
    >
    > 1) Storsteinsfjellet (1,893 m)-Narvik area. Climbed on a magnificent
    > winter's day in March 2001. Skis off 250 m below the summit, and a
    > moderately steep snow climb to reach the final ridge. Minus 20

    degrees
    > Celsius at the top. This is the most alpine, but least well known,

    of the
    > three mountains. A superb winter mountain.
    >
    > 2) Suliskongen (1,907 m)---Sulitjelma area. Climbed in August 2003

    with no
    > views above 1,600 m on account of hill fog. There are a lot of

    glaciers on
    > this mountain, but I found a summer route that only involved a few

    hundred
    > metres on a glacier, which was dry and without crevasses. This hill

    is
    > normally climbed on ski in the late spring.
    >
    > 3) Jiehkkevarri (1,834 m)---Lyngen Alps. Climbed on a nice warm day

    in July
    > 2004 with a congenial group of Norwegians. This mountain lies in a

    very
    > alpine area, but it is relatively flat-topped, and has many of the

    features
    > of a small ice-cap. Because of crevasses a rope is essential---even,

    I was
    > told, for ski ascents earlier in the season. Although accessible, it
    > involves a start at sea-level and, allowing for significant

    re-ascent, it is
    > a long day.
    >
    > The peaks indicated are the highest in the respective areas, but

    there are
    > many other fine mountains in these areas. I have posted reports

    (currently
    > unillustrated) at

    http://www.frostisen.com/mountain/MountainTripIndex.htm.
    > Those who do not know Norway normally start in the south where there

    are
    > many good things, and where conditions tend to be easier. People

    seeking
    > footpaths and marked winter routes in the north of Norway are liable

    to be
    > disappointed.
    >
    > --
    > Alan Law
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest

    Drool - turn green

    I have looked and not touched these beauties.. Never have anyone to
    tie on to the other end of the rope when up there. Usually operated
    in the islands.

    What a lovely bevvy of peaks -and plenty more where they came from.
    This year would have been interesting as they had such a fine summer.
    Possible crap snow conditions?

    Richard Webb
     
  4. Alan Law

    Alan Law Guest

    "RJ Webb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > What a lovely bevvy of peaks -and plenty more where they came from.
    > This year would have been interesting as they had such a fine summer.
    > Possible crap snow conditions?
    >


    The snow on Jiehkkevarri at the end of July was surprisingly good---crampons
    were worn for quite a bit of the time, although they were not strictly
    necessary. And on that particular hill it was snow all the way above 900 m.

    The summer in the north this year seems to have been something of a mixed
    affair. I heard suggestions that it may have been best in Finnmark. It was
    briefly very hot in Troms at the end of July / beginning of August.

    --
    Alan Law
     
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