OT: Are you one?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Gyp, Jun 10, 2003.

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  1. Gyp

    Gyp Guest

    Was sent this not so long ago, struck a cord as "Young folk these days don't know there
    born" <Chuckle>

    Enjoy..Or at the very least be slightly irritated that its wasted you time

    Gyp

    According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 50's, 60's, 70's
    and 80's probably shouldn't have survived.

    Our baby cots were covered with brightly coloured lead-based paint which was promptly chewed
    and licked.

    We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, or latches on doors or cabinets and it was fine to
    play with pans.

    When we rode our bikes, we wore no helmets, just flip flops and fluorescent clackers' on our wheels.

    As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the passenger seat
    was a treat.

    We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle - tasted the same.

    We ate dripping sandwiches, bread and butter pudding and drank fizzy pop with sugar in it, but we
    were never overweight because we were always outside playing.

    We shared one drink with four friends, from one bottle or can and no-one actually died from this.

    We would spend hours building go-carts out of scraps and then went top speed down the hill, only to
    find out we forgot the brakes. After running into stinging nettles a few times, we learned to solve
    the problem.

    We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back before it got dark. No
    one was able to reach us all day and no one minded.

    We did not have Playstations or X-Boxes, no video games at all. No 99 channels on TV, no videotape
    movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, no Internet chat rooms. We had
    friends - we went outside and found them.

    We played elastics and street rounders, and sometimes that ball really hurt.

    We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits. They were
    accidents. We learnt not to do the same thing again.

    We had fights, punched each other hard and got black and blue - we learned to get over it.

    We walked to friend's homes.

    We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and ate live stuff, and although we were told it would
    happen, we did not have very many eyes out, nor did the live stuff live inside us forever.

    We rode bikes in packs of 7 and wore our coats by only the hood.

    Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected. The idea of a parent bailing us out if we
    broke a law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law. Imagine that!

    This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and problem solvers and inventors, ever.
    The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure,
    success and responsibility, and we learned to deal with it all.
     
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  2. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Yup, child of the 70s/80s and still alive.

    Peter.
     
  3. Gyp says:

    >Was sent this not so long ago, struck a cord as "Young folk these days don't know there born"
    ><Chuckle>
    >
    >Enjoy..Or at the very least be slightly irritated that its wasted you time

    <snip the good stuff>

    As a child of the 50's, I certainly did all that. Except wearing my coat only by the hood. And the
    fluorescent clacker thing. I also played in haybarns, practised falling by jumping off balconies
    (like training for a race by riding your bike, no?)

    Steve
     
  4. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Gyp <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > Was sent this not so long ago, struck a cord as "Young folk these days don't know there born"
    > <Chuckle>
    >
    > Enjoy..Or at the very least be slightly irritated that its wasted you time
    >
    > Gyp
    >
    <snip good stuff>

    Yeah, i remember most of that, though it wasn't just the crib that was painted with lead, but the
    whole house.

    And i remember eating rocks as a kid, and somehow, when they came out the other end, they were 10"
    earth worms. and i lived through it all.

    Kind of backs what i have believed for a while, and may even be in print someplace, but the immune
    system learns how to protect the body by curing current infections. these parents now-a-days (some
    anyway) keep their kids from infection far too often.

    if i got a cut, i would get a band-aid for it, if it was too big for a band-aid, it was left open to
    the air. i did not die of infection.

    For instance, my entire family has a high level of antibodies to cat scratch fever, but none of us
    has actually had it. but we have always had cats. sure, they would scratch once in a while, and each
    scratch built up the immune system. i have had several scratches that are plenty deep, and never
    have had cat scratch fever. (cat scratch fever btw is merely an infection from all the stuff the cat
    walks in, claws at, or digs at. ie, litter box. that's what doctor mom says anyway.)

    But this is not to say large injuries should not go untreated. if it can clot itself up in less
    than a minute, then it will probably be alright to go without antibiotic cleaning, depending on
    the source of injury of course (ie, if they were swimming in an above ground abandoned septic
    tank, and got a scratch, you best be bathing them in antibiotic cream. go ahead, ask me for the
    reference to this ;-)
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  5. Mattb

    Mattb Guest

    "Gyp" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Was sent this not so long ago, struck a cord as "Young folk these days don't know there born"
    > <Chuckle>
    >
    > Enjoy..Or at the very least be slightly irritated that its wasted you time
    >
    > Gyp
    >
    <snip>
    > We did not have Playstations or X-Boxes, no video games at all. No 99 channels on TV, no videotape
    > movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, no Internet chat rooms. We had
    > friends - we went outside and found them.
    >

    I was one too, but being in the 70's and 80's, we did eventually have a computer (1984 Mac), and
    even before that I was playing Pong, Tank Battle, and Pac Man on my Atari 2600. We even got one of
    those enormous top-loading VCRs with the _wired_ remote.

    Somehow I think I still turned out OK (although this may be debatable).

    Matt
     
  6. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    On Tue, 10 Jun 2003 09:10:35 +0000 (UTC), Gyp <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Was sent this not so long ago, struck a cord as "Young folk these days don't know there born"
    ><Chuckle>
    >
    >Enjoy..Or at the very least be slightly irritated that its wasted you time
    >
    >Gyp
    >
    >According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 50's, 60's, 70's
    >and 80's probably shouldn't have survived.
    >
    >Our baby cots were covered with brightly coloured lead-based paint which was promptly chewed
    >and licked.
    >
    >We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, or latches on doors or cabinets and it was fine to
    >play with pans.
    >
    >When we rode our bikes, we wore no helmets, just flip flops and fluorescent clackers' on
    >our wheels.
    >
    >As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the passenger seat
    >was a treat.
    >
    >We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle - tasted the same.
    >
    >We ate dripping sandwiches, bread and butter pudding and drank fizzy pop with sugar in it, but we
    >were never overweight because we were always outside playing.
    >
    >We shared one drink with four friends, from one bottle or can and no-one actually died from this.
    >
    >We would spend hours building go-carts out of scraps and then went top speed down the hill, only to
    >find out we forgot the brakes. After running into stinging nettles a few times, we learned to solve
    >the problem.
    >
    >We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back before it got dark. No
    >one was able to reach us all day and no one minded.
    >
    >We did not have Playstations or X-Boxes, no video games at all. No 99 channels on TV, no videotape
    >movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, no Internet chat rooms. We had
    >friends - we went outside and found them.
    >
    >We played elastics and street rounders, and sometimes that ball really hurt.
    >
    >We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits. They were
    >accidents. We learnt not to do the same thing again.
    >
    >We had fights, punched each other hard and got black and blue - we learned to get over it.
    >
    >We walked to friend's homes.
    >
    >We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and ate live stuff, and although we were told it
    >would happen, we did not have very many eyes out, nor did the live stuff live inside us forever.
    >
    >We rode bikes in packs of 7 and wore our coats by only the hood.
    >
    >Our actions were our own. Consequences were expected. The idea of a parent bailing us out if we
    >broke a law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law. Imagine that!
    >
    >This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and problem solvers and inventors, ever.
    >The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure,
    >success and responsibility, and we learned to deal with it all.

    ABSO-FREAKIN LUTELY!!

    Well put Gyp!!

    Dave
     
  7. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Yeah, i remember most of that, though it wasn't just the crib that was painted with lead, but the
    > whole house.
    >
    > And i remember eating rocks as a kid, and somehow, when they came out the other end, they were 10"
    > earth worms. and i lived through it all.

    > ~Travis

    Thanks Travis, I'm actually teary from the laughter.

    Chris
     
  8. Technician

    Technician Guest

    ctg <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    >
    > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Yeah, i remember most of that, though it wasn't just the crib that was painted with lead, but
    > > the whole house.
    > >
    > > And i remember eating rocks as a kid, and somehow, when they came out the other end, they were
    > > 10" earth worms. and i lived through it all.
    >
    > > ~Travis
    >
    > Thanks Travis, I'm actually teary from the laughter.
    >
    > Chris
    >
    >
    >

    hey you laugh, but the worst part is, my babysitter saved the damn things in jars! i mean,
    damn, what the hell was she thinking? though, if i recall, this is the same babysitter who had
    a sheep die, and she left it there for about a week or so. looking back, it is damn amazing i
    am still alive.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  9. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ctg <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > >
    > > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > > Yeah, i remember most of that, though it wasn't just the crib that was painted with lead, but
    > > > the whole house.
    > > >
    > > > And i remember eating rocks as a kid, and somehow, when they came out the other end, they were
    > > > 10" earth worms. and i lived through it all.
    > >
    > > > ~Travis
    > >
    > > Thanks Travis, I'm actually teary from the laughter.
    > >
    > > Chris
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > hey you laugh, but the worst part is, my babysitter saved the damn things in jars! i mean,
    > damn, what the hell was she thinking? though, if i recall, this is the same babysitter who had
    > a sheep die, and she left it there for about a week or so. looking back, it is damn amazing i
    > am still alive.
    > --
    > ~Travis
    >
    > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/

    Stop it! You're gonna kill us. Can a person die from laughing too much
    :)
    --
    Westie - And yeah, I know cause I'm a Kiwi - sheep are difficult to kill.
     
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