OT-Bicycles and Protest In NYC

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by B. Lafferty, Aug 28, 2004.



  1. S M-M Broque

    S M-M Broque Guest

  2. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    What's a 150 people or so?? I have this image in my mind of Drag Race and
    the police trying to catch elusive riders. Ah, I do wish I still lived
    there at moments like this.

    "S M-M Broque" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Your point being don't trust reported arrest figures ?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Bonne route,
    >
    > Sandy
    > Paris FR
    >
    >
    > "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> a écrit dans le message de :
    > news:qY%[email protected]
    >> http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/28/politics/campaign/28protest.html?hp
    >>
    >> --
    >> Peloton Pigs--Flying Since 1991
    >>
    >>

    >
     
  3. Dave Casey

    Dave Casey Guest

    > Ah, I do wish I still lived
    > there at moments like this.


    It's times like these that have me looking forward to retiring in about
    fifteen years to some place like Jackson Hole, or maybe even some place
    smaller.

    ------
    Dave Casey - Realtor
    www.LasVegasHomesDirect.com
    [email protected]
     
  4. Laz

    Laz Guest

    how many riders are killed by careless drivers every year there ?
    cyclists have a valid point that the road does not belong exclusively
    to the automobile- this reaction by the bloody cops is 100% overkill-
    in toronto, cops chaperon critical mass rides, telling irate drivers
    to relax... the rides happen and everyone leaves in peace.
    bikers in nyc should be given respect for their courage and
    contribution to the environment.


    "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > What's a 150 people or so?? I have this image in my mind of Drag Race and
    > the police trying to catch elusive riders. Ah, I do wish I still lived
    > there at moments like this.
    >
    > "S M-M Broque" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Your point being don't trust reported arrest figures ?
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > Bonne route,
    > >
    > > Sandy
    > > Paris FR
    > >
    > >
    > > "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> a écrit dans le message de :
    > > news:qY%[email protected]ad2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > >> http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/28/politics/campaign/28protest.html?hp
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Peloton Pigs--Flying Since 1991
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
     
  5. "Laz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > how many riders are killed by careless drivers every year there ?
    > cyclists have a valid point that the road does not belong exclusively
    > to the automobile- this reaction by the bloody cops is 100% overkill-
    > in toronto, cops chaperon critical mass rides, telling irate drivers
    > to relax... the rides happen and everyone leaves in peace.
    > bikers in nyc should be given respect for their courage and
    > contribution to the environment.


    Hey Laz,

    Sounds like you need one of these:

    http://www.cafepress.com/burt_hoovis.13229409
     
  6. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Keith Alexander? <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote:

    > On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 19:44:48 -0500, "hold my beer and watch this..."
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Hey anon,


    Keith, just so you know, if you stick around for a while, you'll
    understand that Brian isn't really anonymous.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    "Let's turn dining back into eating."
    The Descendents

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  7. On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 04:59:36 GMT, Howard Kveck
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Keith, just so you know, if you stick around for a while, you'll
    >understand that Brian isn't really anonymous.


    *** I know.

    :)

    ---
    k e i t h a l e x a n d e r
    http://www.nootrope.net
    http://www.modernamerican.com
    aim: nootrope9 iaido

    - - e n d t r a n s m i s s i o n - -
     
  8. That's almost as funny as this:

    http://www.cafepress.com/burt_hoovis.13240031?zoom=yes#zoom



    "Keith Alexander®" <[email protected]!nootrope.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 19:44:48 -0500, "hold my beer and watch this..."
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Hey anon,
    >
    > Sounds like you need one of these:
    >
    > http://www.cafepress.com/nootrope.13234556
    >
    > ---
    > k e i t h a l e x a n d e r
    > http://www.nootrope.net
    > http://www.modernamerican.com
    > aim: nootrope9 iaido
    >
    > - - e n d t r a n s m i s s i o n - -
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    >how many riders are killed by careless drivers every year there ?
    >cyclists have a valid point that the road does not belong exclusively
    >to the automobile- this reaction by the bloody cops is 100% overkill-
    >in toronto, cops chaperon critical mass rides, telling irate drivers
    >to relax... the rides happen and everyone leaves in peace.
    > bikers in nyc should be given respect for their courage and
    >contribution to the environment.


    Cops in NYC generally ignore cyclists doing thier thing on the street. Even
    when it is something illegal, like running red lights. Friday, the CM ride
    turned nasty and they were screwing up traffic. So I doubt the reaction
    was overkill. Thanks to the RNC, the city is already a mess and the cops
    are spread pretty thin. So they can't be baby sitting a bunch of mis-behaving
    cyclists all night. Some idiot in city government wasn't thinking when they
    thought having the RNC in NYC was a good idea. I'm sure this is going to
    end up costing us tax payers a lot of money. NYC is like a police state with
    cops, and cop cadets, all over the place. You can't walk a block without
    seeing group of cops.
    ----------------
     
  10. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Some idiot in city government wasn't thinking when they
    > thought having the RNC in NYC was a good idea. I'm sure this is going to
    > end up costing us tax payers a lot of money. NYC is like a police state

    with
    > cops, and cop cadets, all over the place. You can't walk a block without
    > seeing group of cops.


    The point is that now the entire world is seeing what American Liberals are.
    And they don't like what they're seeing. Neither does the overwhelming
    majority of voters in this country.

    So I suppose it was a really good idea. If we can get the Democratic Party
    back to the sort that John F. Kennedy was in perhaps we cold have another
    country worth living in for Americans and not just illegal aliens.
     
  11. gwhite

    gwhite Guest

    Tom Kunich wrote:
    >
    > "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Some idiot in city government wasn't thinking when they
    > > thought having the RNC in NYC was a good idea. I'm sure this is going to
    > > end up costing us tax payers a lot of money. NYC is like a police state

    > with
    > > cops, and cop cadets, all over the place. You can't walk a block without
    > > seeing group of cops.

    >
    > The point is that now the entire world is seeing what American Liberals are.


    That they aren't really liberals, but are socialists?

    http://www.belmont.edu/lockesmith/essay.html

    I'm a liberal, and they are nothing like me.

    > And they don't like what they're seeing. Neither does the overwhelming
    > majority of voters in this country.


    That isn't what the polls say.

    > So I suppose it was a really good idea. If we can get the Democratic Party
    > back to the sort that John F. Kennedy...



    I won't hope for that.


    Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom, pp 1-3

    Introduction


    IN A MUCH QUOTED PASSAGE in his inaugural address, President
    Kennedy said, “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask
    what you can do for your country.” It is a striking sign of the
    temper of our times that the controversy about this passage cen-
    tered on its origin and not on its content. Neither half of the
    statement expresses a relation between the citizen and his gov-
    ernment that is worthy of the ideals of free men in a free society.
    The paternalistic “what your country can do for you” implies
    that government is the patron, the citizen the ward, a view
    that is at odds with the free man’s belief in his own responsibility
    for his own destiny. The organismic, “what you can do for your
    country” implies that government is the master or the deity, the
    citizen, the servant or the votary. To the free man, the country
    is the collection of individuals who compose it, not something
    over and above them. He is proud of a common heritage and
    loyal to common traditions. But he regards government as a
    means, an instrumentality, neither a grantor of favors and gifts,
    nor a master or god to be blindly worshipped and served. He
    recognizes no national goal except as it is the consensus of the
    goals that the citizens severally serve. He recognizes no national
    purpose except as it is the consensus of the purposes for which
    the citizens severally strive.
    The free man will ask neither what his country can do for
    him nor what he can do for his country. He will ask rather
    What can I and my compatriots do through government, to
    help us discharge our individual responsibilities, to achieve our
    several goals and purposes, and above all, to protect our free
    dom? And he will accompany this question with another: How
    can we keep the government we create from becoming a Frank
    enstein that will destroy the very freedom we establish it to pro-
    tect? Freedom is a rare and delicate plant. Our minds tell us,
    and history confirms, that the great threat to freedom is the
    concentration of power. Government is necessary to preserve our
    freedom, it is an instrument through which we can exercise
    our freedom; yet by concentrating power in political hands, it is
    also a threat to freedom. Even though the men who wield this
    power initially be of good will and even though they be not
    corrupted by the power they exercise, the power will both attract
    and form men of a different stamp.
     
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