OT: Calorie Restriction May Reduce Aging

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Apr 4, 2006.

  1. We occassionally post diet related material here since swimimng, and
    diet, and overall health, are very much intertwined. Eric


    Researchers Say Low-Cal Diet Cuts Aging
    By LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer
    1 hour agoUPDATED 1 HOUR 14 MINUTES AGO

    CHICAGO - Longevity researchers say they've shown for the first time
    that
    following a strict low-calorie diet can decrease DNA damage linked with

    aging.


    Some people who took part in the six-month diet study ate as little as
    890
    calories a day. Their insulin levels fell and metabolisms slowed _
    changes
    that are thought to increase longevity.


    The findings are provocative, but preliminary. Longer-term research
    will try
    to sort out whether such changes can meaningfully extend people's
    lives,
    said senior author Eric Ravussin of the Pennington Biomedical Research
    Center at Louisiana State University.


    "They are the first proof that what has been observed in rodents seems
    to be
    also working in humans," Ravussin said.


    The results are from the first phase of research at the Baton Rouge
    center
    sponsored by a $12.4 million National Institute on Aging grant. They
    follow
    unrelated research reported in January which suggested a very
    restrictive
    diet seemed to help the heart age more slowly.


    The latest study appears in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical

    Association.


    "It's very exciting," said Dr. Evan Hadley, director of the NIA's
    geriatrics
    and clinical gerontology program.


    "It's a step forward but not the whole journey," said Hadley, whose
    agency
    is part of the NIH.


    The 48 participants, all slightly overweight, were randomly assigned to
    one
    of four groups: calorie restriction, which cut usual daily calories by
    25
    percent; calorie restriction plus exercise, which cut daily calories by
    12.5
    percent and increased physical activity by 12.5 percent five days a
    week;
    very low calories, with an 890-calorie liquid diet for up to about
    three
    months followed by a weight-maintenance diet; and a control group that
    aimed
    to keep weight steady.


    Government dietary guidelines for weight maintenance recommend about
    2,000
    to 3,000 calories a day, depending on age, gender and activity level,
    with
    the higher amount generally for very active men.


    The non-liquid diets used in the study were high in fruits and
    vegetables
    with less than 30 percent fat.


    Average weight loss was about 18 pounds, slightly more in the
    liquid-diet
    group.


    Blood tests showed substantial decreases in the amount of age-related
    DNA
    damage in each of the three dieting groups, compared with their initial

    levels. That kind of microscopic damage is linked to cancer and other
    age-related ailments, but it's unknown whether the small changes seen
    in the
    study would affect the study volunteers' disease risks.


    No changes were seen in the control group.


    Insulin levels also decreased after six months in all three reduced
    calorie
    groups. Core body temperature also dipped slightly in two low-calorie
    groups
    but not in the liquid-diet or control group.


    The results show that the diets are safe, and not impossible to follow,

    Hadley said.


    Kacy Collins, 34, a once sedentary Baton Rouge law clerk, said she
    joined
    the study to lose weight and hoped that would reduce her risks for
    age-related ailments that run in her family, including diabetes and
    heart
    disease.


    Assigned to the exercise group, Collins said the hardest part was
    eliminating most sweets and exercising daily. But she said eating up to

    seven servings of fruits and vegetables daily kept her feeling full.
    She has
    stuck with the new habits and kept off most of the nearly 30 pounds she
    lost
    since the study ended almost two years ago.


    Collins said it will be a big bonus if the changes help her live
    longer,
    too.


    ___


    On the Net:


    JAMA: http://jama.ama-assn.org


    Pennington research: http://calerie.pbrc.edu/pressrelease.html


    Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material
    may
    not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
     
    Tags:


  2. This is not news. A lot of people practice eating this way - CRON, I
    think it is, forget what it stands for, hang on ... I Googled "cron
    calorie reduction" and found a number of links. It stands for Calorie
    Restriction with Optimal Nutrition - I believe that means they take a
    lot of vitamins. The few I've spoken with who've tried it said it
    interefered with exercise - they had to cut back on their workouts a
    lot. Makes sense.

    -S-

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > We occassionally post diet related material here since swimimng, and
    > diet, and overall health, are very much intertwined. Eric
    >
    >
    > Researchers Say Low-Cal Diet Cuts Aging
    > By LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer
    > 1 hour agoUPDATED 1 HOUR 14 MINUTES AGO
    >
    > CHICAGO - Longevity researchers say they've shown for the first time
    > that
    > following a strict low-calorie diet can decrease DNA damage linked
    > with
    >
    > aging.
    >
    >
    > Some people who took part in the six-month diet study ate as little as
    > 890
    > calories a day. Their insulin levels fell and metabolisms slowed _
    > changes
    > that are thought to increase longevity.
    >
    >
    > The findings are provocative, but preliminary. Longer-term research
    > will try
    > to sort out whether such changes can meaningfully extend people's
    > lives,
    > said senior author Eric Ravussin of the Pennington Biomedical Research
    > Center at Louisiana State University.
    >
    >
    > "They are the first proof that what has been observed in rodents seems
    > to be
    > also working in humans," Ravussin said.
    >
    >
    > The results are from the first phase of research at the Baton Rouge
    > center
    > sponsored by a $12.4 million National Institute on Aging grant. They
    > follow
    > unrelated research reported in January which suggested a very
    > restrictive
    > diet seemed to help the heart age more slowly.
    >
    >
    > The latest study appears in Wednesday's Journal of the American
    > Medical
    >
    > Association.
    >
    >
    > "It's very exciting," said Dr. Evan Hadley, director of the NIA's
    > geriatrics
    > and clinical gerontology program.
    >
    >
    > "It's a step forward but not the whole journey," said Hadley, whose
    > agency
    > is part of the NIH.
    >
    >
    > The 48 participants, all slightly overweight, were randomly assigned
    > to
    > one
    > of four groups: calorie restriction, which cut usual daily calories by
    > 25
    > percent; calorie restriction plus exercise, which cut daily calories
    > by
    > 12.5
    > percent and increased physical activity by 12.5 percent five days a
    > week;
    > very low calories, with an 890-calorie liquid diet for up to about
    > three
    > months followed by a weight-maintenance diet; and a control group that
    > aimed
    > to keep weight steady.
    >
    >
    > Government dietary guidelines for weight maintenance recommend about
    > 2,000
    > to 3,000 calories a day, depending on age, gender and activity level,
    > with
    > the higher amount generally for very active men.
    >
    >
    > The non-liquid diets used in the study were high in fruits and
    > vegetables
    > with less than 30 percent fat.
    >
    >
    > Average weight loss was about 18 pounds, slightly more in the
    > liquid-diet
    > group.
    >
    >
    > Blood tests showed substantial decreases in the amount of age-related
    > DNA
    > damage in each of the three dieting groups, compared with their
    > initial
    >
    > levels. That kind of microscopic damage is linked to cancer and other
    > age-related ailments, but it's unknown whether the small changes seen
    > in the
    > study would affect the study volunteers' disease risks.
    >
    >
    > No changes were seen in the control group.
    >
    >
    > Insulin levels also decreased after six months in all three reduced
    > calorie
    > groups. Core body temperature also dipped slightly in two low-calorie
    > groups
    > but not in the liquid-diet or control group.
    >
    >
    > The results show that the diets are safe, and not impossible to
    > follow,
    >
    > Hadley said.
    >
    >
    > Kacy Collins, 34, a once sedentary Baton Rouge law clerk, said she
    > joined
    > the study to lose weight and hoped that would reduce her risks for
    > age-related ailments that run in her family, including diabetes and
    > heart
    > disease.
    >
    >
    > Assigned to the exercise group, Collins said the hardest part was
    > eliminating most sweets and exercising daily. But she said eating up
    > to
    >
    > seven servings of fruits and vegetables daily kept her feeling full.
    > She has
    > stuck with the new habits and kept off most of the nearly 30 pounds
    > she
    > lost
    > since the study ended almost two years ago.
    >
    >
    > Collins said it will be a big bonus if the changes help her live
    > longer,
    > too.
    >
    >
    > ___
    >
    >
    > On the Net:
    >
    >
    > JAMA: http://jama.ama-assn.org
    >
    >
    > Pennington research: http://calerie.pbrc.edu/pressrelease.html
    >
    >
    > Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This
    > material
    > may
    > not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
    >
     
  3. It IS news, Steve.

    There's been no proof that a calorie restricted diet increaes longevity
    in humans. And this study doesn't prove it, either, but based on test
    results of these subjects, it's starting to make a case for it. The
    people on the CRON diet believe that they will live longer based on the
    experiments using calorie restriction on rodents. The scientific
    community demands more rigor than that to extend the concept to humans.
    You evidently do not.

    Eric
     
  4. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > It IS news, Steve.
    >
    > There's been no proof that a calorie restricted diet increaes
    > longevity
    > in humans. And this study doesn't prove it, either, but based on test
    > results of these subjects, it's starting to make a case for it. The
    > people on the CRON diet believe that they will live longer based on
    > the
    > experiments using calorie restriction on rodents. The scientific
    > community demands more rigor than that to extend the concept to
    > humans.
    > You evidently do not.


    Whatever - it's not something that works out well for anyone who like to
    exercise vigorously and regularly. What's that saying, it's not the
    years in the life but the life in the years that matters - something
    like that.

    This is a funny conversation for me to have because I'm a skinny guy for
    a competitive weight lifter (150 lbs. @ 5'8") and often get grief about
    why I don't move up a weight class and the like. But I think CRON is
    for the birds. I really don't want my metabolism to slow down - seems
    like watching life in slow motion if you ask me.

    -S-
     
  5. rtk

    rtk Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > It IS news, Steve.
    >
    > There's been no proof that a calorie restricted diet increaes longevity
    > in humans. And this study doesn't prove it, either, but based on test
    > results of these subjects, it's starting to make a case for it. The
    > people on the CRON diet believe that they will live longer based on the
    > experiments using calorie restriction on rodents. The scientific
    > community demands more rigor than that to extend the concept to humans.
    > You evidently do not.
    >
    > Eric
    >


    Gotta love nutrition proofs. There has definitely been a
    proof that a calorie restricted diet increases longevity.
    There has also been proof that you'll live longer if you
    carry a little extra padding. Knowledge of nutritional
    needs, even nutritional content in foodstuff, is so meager
    that revelations, epiphanies and eurekas come rolling in
    daily and are pronounced with the fanfare you'd expect if a
    new continent were discovered. I don't even want to know.
    The idea of eating potassium or calcium or vitamin
    whatever, anything measured in grams especially, is
    repulsive to me. I much prefer food.

    Especially lacking so far is information about interaction
    of foods, and whatever difference that might make in their
    value. I'm going by taste for now, which tells me that very
    dark chocolate and red wine (preferably Rhone) will increase
    my longevity. Oddly enough, I think raw oysters and beer
    together enhance quality of life as well as span. I'm
    certain that at least for my own well-being anything that
    has seen the inside of a can or a freezer will ruin my
    swimming as well as my life.

    rtk
     
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