OT for JC

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Carmen, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. Carmen

    Carmen Guest

    The local results for NCLB came out, and it lead me to wonder about
    other areas, and you came to mind. Did some surfing. WTF? I've
    *never* seen sub-group breakouts like that. What's going on down
    there?

    Carmen
     
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  2. "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The local results for NCLB came out, and it lead me to wonder about
    > other areas, and you came to mind. Did some surfing. WTF? I've
    > *never* seen sub-group breakouts like that. What's going on down
    > there?
    >


    We've always had sub-group breakouts like that since before I started
    teaching. I didn't realize that other places were getting exemptions from
    doing these breakouts until quite recently.

    Have you figured out yet that each state gets to set its own standard up to
    which it will be held? WTF is that all about?

    This whole NCLB ball of wax is becoming quite humorous, as I learn more
    about the intimate details. Seems a bit like a huge political shell game.
     
  3. Carmen

    Carmen Guest

    JC Der Koenig wrote:
    > "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > The local results for NCLB came out, and it lead me to wonder about
    > > other areas, and you came to mind. Did some surfing. WTF? I've
    > > *never* seen sub-group breakouts like that. What's going on down
    > > there?
    > >

    >
    > We've always had sub-group breakouts like that since before I started
    > teaching. I didn't realize that other places were getting exemptions from
    > doing these breakouts until quite recently.


    I was referring to the nature of the breakouts. Your worst performers
    are our best performers. Hell, your worst performers are the best
    performers in the vast majority of the country. I didn't know they
    were the worst performers anywhere. That's what floored me. What is
    different at your school?

    > Have you figured out yet that each state gets to set its own standard up to
    > which it will be held? WTF is that all about?


    Oh yeah, isn't that cute? Up to and including the sub-group
    exemptions. As high as 100 in Florida and as low as 5 in Maryland. 45
    here in Tennessee.

    > This whole NCLB ball of wax is becoming quite humorous, as I learn more
    > about the intimate details. Seems a bit like a huge political shell game.


    There's the whole sub-group exemption thing. If a state has less than
    "x" number of members in a sub-group they can exclude the test scores
    of that sub-group from the numbers they report to the feds for the
    purposes of being monitored for NCLB. That "x" number has to be
    pre-approved by the feds ahead of time. Here in Tennessee x=45, so it
    lead to 61 smaller schools being able to exclude *every single student
    in the school* under the reporting rules. It also lead to *every*
    Native American and most Asian and Hispanic students in the state not
    having their scores included. Pretty slick, huh?

    Damn I'm glad my daughter is (1) smart and hard-working and (2)
    graduating next year. Her school also doesn't suck. :)

    Carmen
     
  4. "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > What is different at your school?
    >


    We've had educators come from California, Virginia and some other to places
    to see what is different about our school, but I still haven't heard a
    straight answer on what it might be. Since it's the only public school I've
    worked in, my perspective is a bit narrow. In other words, I don't know.


    >
    > Damn I'm glad my daughter is (1) smart and hard-working and (2)
    > graduating next year. Her school also doesn't suck. :)
    >


    My daughter is at the top of her freshman class and will be taking Calculus
    as a sophomore next year. I'm also glad that she's smart and hard-working.

    So which is it: Nature or nurture?

    ;-)
     
  5. Carmen

    Carmen Guest

    JC Der Koenig wrote:
    > "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > What is different at your school?

    >
    > We've had educators come from California, Virginia and some other to places
    > to see what is different about our school, but I still haven't heard a
    > straight answer on what it might be. Since it's the only public school I've
    > worked in, my perspective is a bit narrow. In other words, I don't know.


    Definitely an odd situation. If they ever come up with any theories
    let me know. It's got me extremely curious.

    > > Damn I'm glad my daughter is (1) smart and hard-working and (2)
    > > graduating next year. Her school also doesn't suck. :)
    > >

    > My daughter is at the top of her freshman class and will be taking Calculus
    > as a sophomore next year. I'm also glad that she's smart and hard-working.


    Excellent! :) Has she got any career track ideas yet?

    > So which is it: Nature or nurture?
    >
    > ;-)


    The only right answer: both. Start with one average or brighter kid
    and give them a decent environment, a bit of praise *when they earn it*
    and a kick in the ass when needed. Damn if you won't see results.
    'Course us being kick-butt parents doesn't hurt. <G>

    Carmen
     
  6. "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > JC Der Koenig wrote:
    >> "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> > What is different at your school?

    >>
    >> We've had educators come from California, Virginia and some other to
    >> places
    >> to see what is different about our school, but I still haven't heard a
    >> straight answer on what it might be. Since it's the only public school
    >> I've
    >> worked in, my perspective is a bit narrow. In other words, I don't know.

    >
    > Definitely an odd situation. If they ever come up with any theories
    > let me know. It's got me extremely curious.
    >
    >> > Damn I'm glad my daughter is (1) smart and hard-working and (2)
    >> > graduating next year. Her school also doesn't suck. :)
    >> >

    >> My daughter is at the top of her freshman class and will be taking
    >> Calculus
    >> as a sophomore next year. I'm also glad that she's smart and
    >> hard-working.

    >
    > Excellent! :) Has she got any career track ideas yet?
    >



    Right now she plans on double-majoring in the actuarial sciences and in
    pre-med, so she can decide whether to pursue a career as an actuary or as a
    pharmacist after she finishes her bachelor work.

    How about your daughter?

    >> So which is it: Nature or nurture?
    >>
    >> ;-)

    >
    > The only right answer: both. Start with one average or brighter kid
    > and give them a decent environment, a bit of praise *when they earn it*
    > and a kick in the ass when needed. Damn if you won't see results.
    > 'Course us being kick-butt parents doesn't hurt. <G>
    >



    Those were pretty much my thoughts also.
     
  7. Luna

    Luna Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > JC Der Koenig wrote:
    > >> "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >> >
    > >> > What is different at your school?
    > >>
    > >> We've had educators come from California, Virginia and some other to
    > >> places
    > >> to see what is different about our school, but I still haven't heard a
    > >> straight answer on what it might be. Since it's the only public school
    > >> I've
    > >> worked in, my perspective is a bit narrow. In other words, I don't know.

    > >
    > > Definitely an odd situation. If they ever come up with any theories
    > > let me know. It's got me extremely curious.
    > >
    > >> > Damn I'm glad my daughter is (1) smart and hard-working and (2)
    > >> > graduating next year. Her school also doesn't suck. :)
    > >> >
    > >> My daughter is at the top of her freshman class and will be taking
    > >> Calculus
    > >> as a sophomore next year. I'm also glad that she's smart and
    > >> hard-working.

    > >
    > > Excellent! :) Has she got any career track ideas yet?
    > >

    >
    >
    > Right now she plans on double-majoring in the actuarial sciences and in
    > pre-med, so she can decide whether to pursue a career as an actuary or as a
    > pharmacist after she finishes her bachelor work.
    >
    > How about your daughter?
    >
    > >> So which is it: Nature or nurture?
    > >>
    > >> ;-)

    > >
    > > The only right answer: both. Start with one average or brighter kid
    > > and give them a decent environment, a bit of praise *when they earn it*
    > > and a kick in the ass when needed. Damn if you won't see results.
    > > 'Course us being kick-butt parents doesn't hurt. <G>
    > >

    >
    >
    > Those were pretty much my thoughts also.


    And then if they still turn out to be losers anyway, you know it was
    because of the third thing that always gets left out of the
    nature/nurture debate: choices. I've known bright people born to good
    parents who nevertheless chose a self-destructive path, and vice versa.
     
  8. "Luna" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > JC Der Koenig wrote:
    >> >> "Carmen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> news:[email protected]
    >> >> >
    >> >> > What is different at your school?
    >> >>
    >> >> We've had educators come from California, Virginia and some other to
    >> >> places
    >> >> to see what is different about our school, but I still haven't heard a
    >> >> straight answer on what it might be. Since it's the only public
    >> >> school
    >> >> I've
    >> >> worked in, my perspective is a bit narrow. In other words, I don't
    >> >> know.
    >> >
    >> > Definitely an odd situation. If they ever come up with any theories
    >> > let me know. It's got me extremely curious.
    >> >
    >> >> > Damn I'm glad my daughter is (1) smart and hard-working and (2)
    >> >> > graduating next year. Her school also doesn't suck. :)
    >> >> >
    >> >> My daughter is at the top of her freshman class and will be taking
    >> >> Calculus
    >> >> as a sophomore next year. I'm also glad that she's smart and
    >> >> hard-working.
    >> >
    >> > Excellent! :) Has she got any career track ideas yet?
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >> Right now she plans on double-majoring in the actuarial sciences and in
    >> pre-med, so she can decide whether to pursue a career as an actuary or as
    >> a
    >> pharmacist after she finishes her bachelor work.
    >>
    >> How about your daughter?
    >>
    >> >> So which is it: Nature or nurture?
    >> >>
    >> >> ;-)
    >> >
    >> > The only right answer: both. Start with one average or brighter kid
    >> > and give them a decent environment, a bit of praise *when they earn it*
    >> > and a kick in the ass when needed. Damn if you won't see results.
    >> > 'Course us being kick-butt parents doesn't hurt. <G>
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >> Those were pretty much my thoughts also.

    >
    > And then if they still turn out to be losers anyway, you know it was
    > because of the third thing that always gets left out of the
    > nature/nurture debate: choices. I've known bright people born to good
    > parents who nevertheless chose a self-destructive path, and vice versa.



    I work with a mathematician who was born to crappy parents but always makes
    good decisions.
     
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