OT: Interesting bird experience today

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by TheAlligator, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    Well, I rarely pay attention to birds, since there are so many around
    here. I usually take time to observe the daily geese commute -
    there's a Hunting club nearby that keeps a large group of
    partly-domesticated ones. Every day at sunrise, they fly over my
    house to spend the day at a lake at the back of the property, then fly
    home around or shortly after sunset. And I occasionally notice the
    odd mockingbird or two, since they're free entertainment. The spring
    migration has apparently begun. Shortly after 6am, I had to make a
    quick run down the road. I looked up and thought, "great, more
    thunderstorms rolling in". Wrong. It was an approaching CLOUD of
    birds that I could not see either end of on the horizon, left to
    right. Anyway, I got home, and went out to feed 2 of the dogs. Said
    bird cloud engulfed us all. Hundreds of thousands of them. Never
    seen anything like it, at least not from this perspective. Rather
    than go nuts, the dogs were completely frozen in time. In contrast,
    the collie-shepherd mix is famous for snatching low-flying birds out
    of mid-air and killing them. AT this point I figure, well I haven't
    had my shower yet anyway, so I just stood there and waited for the
    experience. The bottom layer was so low, and so close to us, that
    they whipped up enough wind to make my hair stand straight up.
    Hundreds of them literally passed my head so close that if I had
    moved, they would have nailed me. Everyone should have this
    experience. Cool beyond belief.
     
    Tags:


  2. nancree

    nancree Guest

    "I usually take time to observe the daily geese commute -
    there's a Hunting club nearby that keeps a large group of
    partly-domesticated ones. Every day at sunrise, they fly over my
    house to spend the day at a lake at the back
    --------------------------
    Fascinating! Were they all geese? Canadian Geese or snow geese? What
    part of the country? Seems to me that it's too early for a spring
    migration, but that depends upon where you are.
    Nancree
     
  3. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    TheAlligator wrote:
    > Well, I rarely pay attention to birds, since there are so many around
    > here. I usually take time to observe the daily geese commute -
    > there's a Hunting club nearby that keeps a large group of
    > partly-domesticated ones. Every day at sunrise, they fly over my
    > house to spend the day at a lake at the back of the property, then

    fly
    > home around or shortly after sunset. And I occasionally notice the
    > odd mockingbird or two, since they're free entertainment. The spring
    > migration has apparently begun. Shortly after 6am, I had to make a
    > quick run down the road. I looked up and thought, "great, more
    > thunderstorms rolling in". Wrong. It was an approaching CLOUD of
    > birds that I could not see either end of on the horizon, left to
    > right. Anyway, I got home, and went out to feed 2 of the dogs. Said
    > bird cloud engulfed us all. Hundreds of thousands of them. Never
    > seen anything like it, at least not from this perspective. Rather
    > than go nuts, the dogs were completely frozen in time. In contrast,
    > the collie-shepherd mix is famous for snatching low-flying birds out
    > of mid-air and killing them. AT this point I figure, well I haven't
    > had my shower yet anyway, so I just stood there and waited for the
    > experience. The bottom layer was so low, and so close to us, that
    > they whipped up enough wind to make my hair stand straight up.
    > Hundreds of them literally passed my head so close that if I had
    > moved, they would have nailed me. Everyone should have this
    > experience. Cool beyond belief.


    What were you drinking?
     
  4. elaine

    elaine Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > TheAlligator wrote:
    > > Well, I rarely pay attention to birds, since there are so many around
    > > here. I usually take time to observe the daily geese commute -
    > > there's a Hunting club nearby that keeps a large group of
    > > partly-domesticated ones. Every day at sunrise, they fly over my
    > > house to spend the day at a lake at the back of the property, then

    > fly
    > > home around or shortly after sunset. And I occasionally notice the
    > > odd mockingbird or two, since they're free entertainment. The spring
    > > migration has apparently begun. Shortly after 6am, I had to make a
    > > quick run down the road. I looked up and thought, "great, more
    > > thunderstorms rolling in". Wrong. It was an approaching CLOUD of
    > > birds that I could not see either end of on the horizon, left to
    > > right. Anyway, I got home, and went out to feed 2 of the dogs. Said
    > > bird cloud engulfed us all. Hundreds of thousands of them. Never
    > > seen anything like it, at least not from this perspective. Rather
    > > than go nuts, the dogs were completely frozen in time. In contrast,
    > > the collie-shepherd mix is famous for snatching low-flying birds out
    > > of mid-air and killing them. AT this point I figure, well I haven't
    > > had my shower yet anyway, so I just stood there and waited for the
    > > experience. The bottom layer was so low, and so close to us, that
    > > they whipped up enough wind to make my hair stand straight up.
    > > Hundreds of them literally passed my head so close that if I had
    > > moved, they would have nailed me. Everyone should have this
    > > experience. Cool beyond belief.

    >
    > What were you drinking?


    Or smoking? Sounds like something out of Hitchcock's 'the Birds '
    movie...

    I wouldn't think Canada Geese though.

    Elaine
     
  5. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    "nancree" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Fascinating! Were they all geese? Canadian Geese or snow geese? What
    >part of the country? Seems to me that it's too early for a spring
    >migration, but that depends upon where you are.
    >Nancree
    >

    Central Illinois, close to St. Louis. But the geese weren't part of
    the cloud - they come twice a day. Canadian geese. I'm ashamed to
    say that I was so entranced, I can't tell you what kind of birds they
    were, except small and dark, and not starlings.
     
  6. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >What were you drinking?
    >

    No, Sheldon, I swear to God. It was beyond belief, as your post
    attests. By the way, I can't drink. I'm in stage 4 of 4 -
    non-alcoholic advanced liver disease. Waiting for the reaper, don't
    you know.
     
  7. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    "elaine" <[email protected]> wrote:
    I would say that I need to post more carefully - but I simply can't
    understand why 2 people thought I was talking about geese - millions
    of them. The geese were a side-comment.
     
  8. Elisa

    Elisa Guest

    "TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>What were you drinking?
    >>

    > No, Sheldon, I swear to God. It was beyond belief, as your post
    > attests. By the way, I can't drink. I'm in stage 4 of 4 -
    > non-alcoholic advanced liver disease. Waiting for the reaper, don't
    > you know.


    But, the liver regenerates itself. Isn't this possible in your case?

    Elisa (started to tell you a very sad story about losing my father last
    October from acute liver failure brought on by a simple surgery, but decided
    that it seemed too insensitive)
     
  9. elaine

    elaine Guest

    TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >What were you drinking?
    > >

    > No, Sheldon, I swear to God. It was beyond belief, as your post
    > attests. By the way, I can't drink. I'm in stage 4 of 4 -
    > non-alcoholic advanced liver disease. Waiting for the reaper, don't
    > you know.


    For real? Well then it was a sign!

    Elaine
     
  10. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    "Elisa" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> No, Sheldon, I swear to God. It was beyond belief, as your post
    >> attests. By the way, I can't drink. I'm in stage 4 of 4 -
    >> non-alcoholic advanced liver disease. Waiting for the reaper, don't
    >> you know.

    >
    >But, the liver regenerates itself. Isn't this possible in your case?
    >
    >Elisa (started to tell you a very sad story about losing my father last
    >October from acute liver failure brought on by a simple surgery, but decided
    >that it seemed too insensitive)
    >
    >

    Hi, Elisa. No, it's not insensitive, and if you want to tell me the
    story, I'd be very happy to hear it. My father was almost never sick
    a day in his life and if he was, he just threw up out the car window
    and went to work. A mountain of a man - one I can never dream of
    emulating. Suddenly in 1987, his left eyelid started drooping. He
    went to St. Louis University Hospital to have some tests done. The
    night before was the last time I ever spoke to him before he spent 9
    days in a coma and died at 8 am the day after Christmas. I am not
    afraid of dying, Elisa. But everyday life is more than I care to deal
    with, sometimes. To answer your question - at my stage, regeneration
    is not possible and neither is a transplant. Back to ole' St. Louis
    University - I have become the love-child of one of their
    doctor-researchers - my condition is his particular object of
    interest, because it is extremely rare. Guess I should have bought a
    lottery ticket <G>. And, based on the very limited statistics of this,
    people with my condition seem to re-develop immediately after a
    transplant, if they even survive the operation. As a side note . . .
    right after I was finally diagnosed (they kept telling me I had the
    flu every 3 or 4 weeks for about 4 years) my favorite uncle died of
    liver cancer. And he told me, in person "it's not so bad, son - I can
    think of a whole lot worse ways to go". Understandably, this has been
    a real comfort to me. OK. I swore I would never post this, but I
    can't help it. Someone (a friend) gave me this link, and I have to
    tell you, it changed my life. No matter what you're going through,
    this will change your outlook. It takes about 6 or 7 minutes to watch
    and you need highspeed internet. I've only avoided posting it because
    of all the virulent God-haters I encounter. At this point in my life,
    to heck with them, so here goes. I got a phone call one Sunday
    morning from a friend who told me "Just do this",so I went to the
    mentioned website (www.farese.com) and sent him an email, ending with
    a note to please not bother to respond. Well, he did - and since he
    can't move a single muscle, there were various mis-spellings because
    it was all done by voice recognition. He doesn't give a crap about
    his own afflictions - he wrote me (by VR) a 4-page email trying to
    build me up. Quite a man, in my opinion. Go to:
    http://www.coralridge.org/BroadcastArchives.asp Click the calendar
    back to January 2005 and click on 1/23/05. No, I'm not Presbyterian
    (can't even spell it). And if it doesn't change your life, you're
    hopeless.
     
  11. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    "elaine" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >What were you drinking?
    >> >

    >> No, Sheldon, I swear to God. It was beyond belief, as your post
    >> attests. By the way, I can't drink. I'm in stage 4 of 4 -
    >> non-alcoholic advanced liver disease. Waiting for the reaper, don't
    >> you know.

    >
    >For real? Well then it was a sign!
    >
    >Elaine

    I'm sorry Elaine, but you lost me. Medications and whatnot I assume.
    A sign of what? I'm really not being a butthole, - it's a serious
    question.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  12. elaine

    elaine Guest

    "TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "elaine" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >What were you drinking?
    > >> >
    > >> No, Sheldon, I swear to God. It was beyond belief, as your post
    > >> attests. By the way, I can't drink. I'm in stage 4 of 4 -
    > >> non-alcoholic advanced liver disease. Waiting for the reaper, don't
    > >> you know.

    > >
    > >For real? Well then it was a sign!
    > >
    > >Elaine

    > I'm sorry Elaine, but you lost me. Medications and whatnot I assume.
    > A sign of what? I'm really not being a butthole, - it's a serious
    > question.


    I am so sorry - I was being flippant. Your comment about waiting for the
    reaper triggered my skeptical side. Guess I'm the butthole!

    Elaine
     
  13. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    "elaine" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >I am so sorry - I was being flippant. Your comment about waiting for the
    >reaper triggered my skeptical side. Guess I'm the butthole!
    >
    >Elaine

    Hey, no apology neccesary. I have to tell you, it was one of the most
    unusual things I have ever experienced. It's impossible to transfer
    this to someone who has never been there.
     
  14. -L.

    -L. Guest

    TheAlligator wrote:
    > Well, I rarely pay attention to birds, since there are so many around
    > here.


    <snip>

    Very cool story. I had a similar experience with butterflies once.

    I wonder what kind fo birds they were - grackles maybe?

    -L.
     
  15. Andy

    Andy Guest

    [email protected] (TheAlligator) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "nancree" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Fascinating! Were they all geese? Canadian Geese or snow geese? What
    >>part of the country? Seems to me that it's too early for a spring
    >>migration, but that depends upon where you are.
    >>Nancree
    >>

    > Central Illinois, close to St. Louis. But the geese weren't part of
    > the cloud - they come twice a day. Canadian geese. I'm ashamed to
    > say that I was so entranced, I can't tell you what kind of birds they
    > were, except small and dark, and not starlings.


    The Alligator,

    First of all they're CANADA (!!!!!) geese. But anyway check it out:

    http://gbbc.birdsource.org/gbbcApps/report?
    cmd=showReport&reportName=StateSummary&state=US-IL&year=2005
    &sortBy=count&order=desc#listTable

    Make sure you can paste the whole link to get there.

    All the best,

    Andy

    --
    "Ladies and gentlemen, The Beatles!"
    - Ed Sullivan (1964)
     
  16. TheAlligator

    TheAlligator Guest

    Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >First of all they're CANADA (!!!!!) geese. But anyway check it out:
    >
    >http://gbbc.birdsource.org/gbbcApps/report?
    >cmd=showReport&reportName=StateSummary&state=US-IL&year=2005
    >&sortBy=count&order=desc#listTable
    >
    >Make sure you can paste the whole link to get there.
    >
    >All the best,
    >
    >Andy

    Thanks for the link. Only one that looks close is the common grackle,
    but the count for those here is VERY low. I think I was too
    hypnoticed to notice - and the fact that the event was something akin
    to traveling through the "Time Tunnel".
     
  17. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    elaine wrote:
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > TheAlligator wrote:
    > > > Well, I rarely pay attention to birds, since there are so many

    around
    > > > here. I usually take time to observe the daily geese commute -
    > > > there's a Hunting club nearby that keeps a large group of
    > > > partly-domesticated ones. Every day at sunrise, they fly over my
    > > > house to spend the day at a lake at the back of the property,

    then
    > > fly
    > > > home around or shortly after sunset. And I occasionally notice

    the
    > > > odd mockingbird or two, since they're free entertainment. The

    spring
    > > > migration has apparently begun. Shortly after 6am, I had to make

    a
    > > > quick run down the road. I looked up and thought, "great, more
    > > > thunderstorms rolling in". Wrong. It was an approaching CLOUD

    of
    > > > birds that I could not see either end of on the horizon, left to
    > > > right. Anyway, I got home, and went out to feed 2 of the dogs.

    Said
    > > > bird cloud engulfed us all. Hundreds of thousands of them.

    Never
    > > > seen anything like it, at least not from this perspective.

    Rather
    > > > than go nuts, the dogs were completely frozen in time. In

    contrast,
    > > > the collie-shepherd mix is famous for snatching low-flying birds

    out
    > > > of mid-air and killing them. AT this point I figure, well I

    haven't
    > > > had my shower yet anyway, so I just stood there and waited for

    the
    > > > experience. The bottom layer was so low, and so close to us,

    that
    > > > they whipped up enough wind to make my hair stand straight up.
    > > > Hundreds of them literally passed my head so close that if I had
    > > > moved, they would have nailed me. Everyone should have this
    > > > experience. Cool beyond belief.

    > >
    > > What were you drinking?

    >
    > Or smoking? Sounds like something out of Hitchcock's 'the Birds '
    > movie...
    >
    > I wouldn't think Canada Geese though.
    >
    > Elaine


    Nah, Canada Geese always fly in formation... and you'll generally hear
    their honking before you see them... and they never fly low, because
    Canada Geese can't soar except for the last bit of their decent upon
    landing, and then they flap in reverse, they need to flap during their
    entire flight, amazing considering the distances they migrate. When
    Canada geese begin a decent to land they will land, they cannot reverse
    direction once they are in decent mode... they cannot hover, flit, and
    frolic about over your head. But Canada Geese are the absolute masters
    of high altitude flight (they own the stratosphere), which is why
    you'll rarely see them unless they are taking off or coming in... and
    they are always seen in even numbers, when you see one alone it will
    always be on the ground, it has lost it's mate and will not fly (or
    eat) until it finds another... if it doesn't find another mate within a
    few days it will wander off to a secluded place and die of starvation.
     
  18. Emil

    Emil Guest

    To God Be the Glory.
    Amen brother your reward awaits.


    --
    Emil Luca

    "TheAlligator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Elisa" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> No, Sheldon, I swear to God. It was beyond belief, as your post
    >>> attests. By the way, I can't drink. I'm in stage 4 of 4 -
    >>> non-alcoholic advanced liver disease. Waiting for the reaper, don't
    >>> you know.

    >>
    >>But, the liver regenerates itself. Isn't this possible in your case?
    >>
    >>Elisa (started to tell you a very sad story about losing my father last
    >>October from acute liver failure brought on by a simple surgery, but
    >>decided
    >>that it seemed too insensitive)
    >>
    >>

    > Hi, Elisa. No, it's not insensitive, and if you want to tell me the
    > story, I'd be very happy to hear it. My father was almost never sick
    > a day in his life and if he was, he just threw up out the car window
    > and went to work. A mountain of a man - one I can never dream of
    > emulating. Suddenly in 1987, his left eyelid started drooping. He
    > went to St. Louis University Hospital to have some tests done. The
    > night before was the last time I ever spoke to him before he spent 9
    > days in a coma and died at 8 am the day after Christmas. I am not
    > afraid of dying, Elisa. But everyday life is more than I care to deal
    > with, sometimes. To answer your question - at my stage, regeneration
    > is not possible and neither is a transplant. Back to ole' St. Louis
    > University - I have become the love-child of one of their
    > doctor-researchers - my condition is his particular object of
    > interest, because it is extremely rare. Guess I should have bought a
    > lottery ticket <G>. And, based on the very limited statistics of this,
    > people with my condition seem to re-develop immediately after a
    > transplant, if they even survive the operation. As a side note . . .
    > right after I was finally diagnosed (they kept telling me I had the
    > flu every 3 or 4 weeks for about 4 years) my favorite uncle died of
    > liver cancer. And he told me, in person "it's not so bad, son - I can
    > think of a whole lot worse ways to go". Understandably, this has been
    > a real comfort to me. OK. I swore I would never post this, but I
    > can't help it. Someone (a friend) gave me this link, and I have to
    > tell you, it changed my life. No matter what you're going through,
    > this will change your outlook. It takes about 6 or 7 minutes to watch
    > and you need highspeed internet. I've only avoided posting it because
    > of all the virulent God-haters I encounter. At this point in my life,
    > to heck with them, so here goes. I got a phone call one Sunday
    > morning from a friend who told me "Just do this",so I went to the
    > mentioned website (www.farese.com) and sent him an email, ending with
    > a note to please not bother to respond. Well, he did - and since he
    > can't move a single muscle, there were various mis-spellings because
    > it was all done by voice recognition. He doesn't give a crap about
    > his own afflictions - he wrote me (by VR) a 4-page email trying to
    > build me up. Quite a man, in my opinion. Go to:
    > http://www.coralridge.org/BroadcastArchives.asp Click the calendar
    > back to January 2005 and click on 1/23/05. No, I'm not Presbyterian
    > (can't even spell it). And if it doesn't change your life, you're
    > hopeless.
     
  19. Sheldon wrote:

    > Nah, Canada Geese always fly in formation... and you'll generally hear
    > their honking before you see them...



    Late at night when it's really quiet I can sometimes hear them high up above
    in the sky even here in Chicago when they are migrating. It's pretty
    neat...


    >and they never fly low, because
    > Canada Geese can't soar except for the last bit of their decent upon
    > landing, and then they flap in reverse, they need to flap during their
    > entire flight, amazing considering the distances they migrate. When
    > Canada geese begin a decent to land they will land, they cannot reverse
    > direction once they are in decent mode... they cannot hover, flit, and
    > frolic about over your head. But Canada Geese are the absolute masters
    > of high altitude flight (they own the stratosphere), which is why
    > you'll rarely see them unless they are taking off or coming in... and
    > they are always seen in even numbers, when you see one alone it will
    > always be on the ground, it has lost it's mate and will not fly (or
    > eat) until it finds another... if it doesn't find another mate within a
    > few days it will wander off to a secluded place and die of starvation.
    >



    Sad and romantic, poor goose :-(

    You got any unusual birds (and I mean of the *avian* variety, natch) up
    there on yer property, Sheldon...???

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  20. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Gregory Morrow wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > > Nah, Canada Geese always fly in formation... and you'll generally

    hear
    > > their honking before you see them...

    >
    >
    > Late at night when it's really quiet I can sometimes hear them high

    up above
    > in the sky even here in Chicago when they are migrating. It's pretty
    > neat...
    >
    >
    > >and they never fly low, because
    > > Canada Geese can't soar except for the last bit of their decent

    upon
    > > landing, and then they flap in reverse, they need to flap during

    their
    > > entire flight, amazing considering the distances they migrate.

    When
    > > Canada geese begin a decent to land they will land, they cannot

    reverse
    > > direction once they are in decent mode... they cannot hover, flit,

    and
    > > frolic about over your head. But Canada Geese are the absolute

    masters
    > > of high altitude flight (they own the stratosphere), which is why
    > > you'll rarely see them unless they are taking off or coming in...

    and
    > > they are always seen in even numbers, when you see one alone it

    will
    > > always be on the ground, it has lost it's mate and will not fly (or
    > > eat) until it finds another... if it doesn't find another mate

    within a
    > > few days it will wander off to a secluded place and die of

    starvation.
    > >

    >
    >
    > Sad and romantic, poor goose :-(
    >
    > You got any unusual birds (and I mean of the *avian* variety, natch)

    up
    > there on yer property, Sheldon...???
    >
    > --
    > Best
    > Greg


    Quite a variety... have lots of Canada Geese here all summer (my 50 odd
    gaggle should be arriving shortly). I feed the hummingbirds, they are
    truly remarkable... even remind me to refill their feeder by taping on
    my window. And there are all the usuals, blue jays and robins are
    already appearing (gonna be an early spring) and all sorts of vicious
    little woodpeckers make a racket around here. There are all sorts of
    waterfowl; egrets, herons, cranes, storks. And all the raptors soaring
    about... don't let your cat or small dog out. And then the owls are a
    hoot. My murder of crows are here all winter, I feed them too,
    arrogant big black pricks they are, but highly intelligent, I bet they
    have higher IQs than 90% of RFCers. In fact this past Christmas I
    bought myself three different copys of Sibleys new bird books,
    including Bird Life & Behaviour. Got myself a high powered Nikon
    spotting scope too... wish I had this beauty when I lived on Lung
    Guyland, there are no windows to peep into here.
     
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