OT: Interesting theory

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bomba, Mar 25, 2003.

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  1. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    The one thing that has always confused me about the attack on Iraq has been the motive. I've
    listened to the ever-changing excuses paraded by the allies, but none of them have been convincing
    in my opinion. Oil was a factor, but I couldn't work out why.

    Similarly, although I always liked to believe that France and Germany opposed a war for reasons of
    justice and not condoning US / UK aggresion, there was always a nagging thought that there was a
    vested interest.

    These articles propose a theory that makes a lot of sense. I suppose it counts as a conspiracy
    theory, but seeing as I'm not convinced of any current theories, alternatives are always an option.
    They are well written and the facts hold up to the investigation that I have done.

    Whatever your views, it's certainly interesting reading.

    http://www.sierratimes.com/03/02/07/arpubwc020703.htm

    http://www.feasta.org/documents/papers/oil1.htm

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  2. Panda

    Panda Guest

    yup, interesting

    panda

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The one thing that has always confused me about the attack on Iraq has been the motive. I've
    > listened to the ever-changing excuses paraded by the allies, but none of them have been convincing
    > in my opinion. Oil was a factor, but I couldn't work out why.
    >
    > Similarly, although I always liked to believe that France and Germany opposed a war for reasons of
    > justice and not condoning US / UK aggresion, there was always a nagging thought that there was a
    > vested interest.
    >
    > These articles propose a theory that makes a lot of sense. I suppose it counts as a conspiracy
    > theory, but seeing as I'm not convinced of any current theories, alternatives are always an
    > option. They are well written and the facts hold up to the investigation that I have done.
    >
    > Whatever your views, it's certainly interesting reading.
    >
    > http://www.sierratimes.com/03/02/07/arpubwc020703.htm
    >
    > http://www.feasta.org/documents/papers/oil1.htm
    >
    > --
    > a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm
    >
    > a.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  3. Andy Chequer

    Andy Chequer Guest

    The French for one (and the Russians too IIRC) have big oil contracts with Iraq at the moment.
    Conspiracy or not, this remnains true.

    What amuses me hugely is that thousands of kids who skive of school to protest against the war are
    accused by the grown ups of acting out of blatant self interest.

    Its all a big mess and I've decided that I can't be arsed with any of it unless it comes between me
    and my bicycles. Then I will act out of self interest, just like everybody else.

    Andy Chequer
     
  4. Miles Todd

    Miles Todd Guest

    On Tue, 25 Mar 2003 11:58:17 +0100, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The one thing that has always confused me about the attack on Iraq has been the motive. I've
    > listened to the ever-changing excuses paraded by the allies, but none of them have been convincing
    > in my opinion. Oil was a factor, but I couldn't work out why.
    >
    > Similarly, although I always liked to believe that France and Germany opposed a war for reasons of
    > justice and not condoning US / UK aggresion, there was always a nagging thought that there was a
    > vested interest.
    >
    > These articles propose a theory that makes a lot of sense. I suppose it counts as a conspiracy
    > theory, but seeing as I'm not convinced of any current theories, alternatives are always an
    > option. They are well written and the facts hold up to the investigation that I have done.
    >
    > Whatever your views, it's certainly interesting reading.
    >
    > http://www.sierratimes.com/03/02/07/arpubwc020703.htm
    >
    > http://www.feasta.org/documents/papers/oil1.htm
    >

    Well, up to now I have been completely against this adventure in Iraq. Now, though, I see how really
    good an idea it is-anything to keep those goddamned Europeans from getting a leg up is OK by me.

    Miles

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  5. > the allies, but none of them have been convincing in my opinion. Oil was
    > > a factor, but I couldn't work out why.
    > >
    > > Similarly, although I always liked to believe that France and Germany opposed a war for reasons
    > > of justice and not condoning US / UK aggresion, there was always a nagging thought that there
    > > was a vested interest.
    > >
    > > These articles propose a theory that makes a lot of sense. I suppose it counts as a conspiracy
    > > theory, but seeing as I'm not convinced of any current theories, alternatives are always an
    > > option. They are well written and the facts hold up to the investigation that I have done.
    > >
    > > Whatever your views, it's certainly interesting reading.
    > >
    > > http://www.sierratimes.com/03/02/07/arpubwc020703.htm
    > >
    > > http://www.feasta.org/documents/papers/oil1.htm
    >

    If back when the launch happened, all the people of Europe were told that converting to the Euro was
    going to screw the US then there probably wouldn't be a country that didn't sign up :)
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  6. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Chris Phillipo wrote:

    > If back when the launch happened, all the people of Europe were told that converting to the Euro
    > was going to screw the US then there probably wouldn't be a country that didn't sign up :)

    I imagine Canada would have been first in the queue :)
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, myarse247 @hotmail.com says...
    > Chris Phillipo wrote:
    >
    > > If back when the launch happened, all the people of Europe were told that converting to the Euro
    > > was going to screw the US then there probably wouldn't be a country that didn't sign up :)
    >
    > I imagine Canada would have been first in the queue :)
    >
    >

    I think the EU kicked the tires on our dollar and said "I'll give ya 20 cents for it if you throw in
    some potatoes" and we didn't go for it.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  8. Well... I'm not sure I agree. Countries have dabbled against the dollar in the past... The reason we
    are off the gold standard was because of DeGaulle to start with... there was great currency pain in
    the late 60's...

    I agree that the dollar is down a little, however that should be expected when the U.S. is in a
    recession (http://finance.yahoo.com/m5?s=USD&t=EUR&a=1&c=2) and can actually help U.S. businesses...

    Both European and Asian countries fear a weak dollar, because it drives up the price of their
    imports into the United States... decreasing their sales and making U.S. items comparatively
    cheaper. The United States is the largest consumer, not just of oil, but many, many other products
    that keep other nations afloat.

    --
    John Nelson
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  9. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Well... I'm not sure I agree. Countries have dabbled against the dollar in the past... The reason
    > we are off the gold standard was because of DeGaulle to start with... there was great currency
    > pain in the late 60's...
    >
    > I agree that the dollar is down a little, however that should be expected when the U.S. is in a
    > recession (http://finance.yahoo.com/m5?s=USD&t=EUR&a=1&c=2) and can actually help U.S.
    > businesses...
    >
    > Both European and Asian countries fear a weak dollar, because it drives up the price of their
    > imports into the United States... decreasing their sales and making U.S. items comparatively
    > cheaper. The United States is the largest consumer, not just of oil, but many, many other products
    > that keep other nations afloat.
    >
    >

    The problem is you can only continue to be a consumer for so long when you are not exporting, i.e.
    "earning", as much as you are buying. Now Bush wants more timber from us (Canada) and drinking water
    too. I fear that the next president is going to take a look at the books and say "What did this
    f*cker leave me with here??".
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
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