OT: It looks like the Apocalypse

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kurgan Gringion, Oct 27, 2003.

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  1. outside right now.

    Ewoud Dronkert wrote:

    >Hey Henry, those fires anywhere near you? Hope not. Great picture:
    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&u=/031026/480/ny11310262336&e=2

    Last night, the wind was blowing the smoke south, so we could see. I've got a nice view from the
    deck - can see a long ways. At sunset, one of the large hills, which had smoke behind it all day,
    suddenly was smoking itself. You could see houses below, three quarters of the way down the hill -
    the setting sun was reflecting brightly off the glass. Still no flames though, just smoke.

    Went back inside, made some phone calls. 30 minutes later it was dark. Look outside - I could see
    flames now. The smoke was bright orange (reflecting light from the flames). The flames had moved
    below the elevation where I had seen the light reflecting off the glass of the houses - it seems
    like they had been consumed within that half hour.

    Today the wind has changed and the sky is yellowish brown. Sunlight reflecting off some stainless
    steel items in my home is orange and the walls have an orange tint to them as a result. Can't see
    the flames, there's too much smoke in the way.

    The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco w/ a fire sprinkler system so
    it's not likely to burn. But my Dumbass Neighbor has 40 foot eucalyptus and pine trees. We live on
    the edge of a brush-filled canyon - you'd think he'd have the brains to do something about all the
    fuel he's got growing around and over his house.

    The ground is becoming covered with ash.
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > outside right now.
    >
    >
    > Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    >
    > >Hey Henry, those fires anywhere near you? Hope not. Great picture:
    >
    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&u=/031026/480/ny11310262336&e=2
    >
    >
    > Last night, the wind was blowing the smoke south, so we could see. I've
    got a
    > nice view from the deck - can see a long ways. At sunset, one of the large hills, which had smoke
    > behind it all day, suddenly was smoking itself. You could see houses below, three quarters of the
    > way down the hill - the
    setting
    > sun was reflecting brightly off the glass. Still no flames though, just smoke.
    >
    >
    > Went back inside, made some phone calls. 30 minutes later it was dark.
    Look
    > outside - I could see flames now. The smoke was bright orange (reflecting light from the flames).
    > The flames had moved below the elevation where I
    had
    > seen the light reflecting off the glass of the houses - it seems like they had been consumed
    > within that half hour.
    >
    >
    > Today the wind has changed and the sky is yellowish brown. Sunlight reflecting off some stainless
    > steel items in my home is orange and the
    walls
    > have an orange tint to them as a result. Can't see the flames, there's too much smoke in the way.
    >
    >
    > The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco w/
    a
    > fire sprinkler system so it's not likely to burn. But my Dumbass Neighbor
    has
    > 40 foot eucalyptus and pine trees. We live on the edge of a brush-filled canyon - you'd think he'd
    > have the brains to do something about all the
    fuel
    > he's got growing around and over his house.
    >
    >
    > The ground is becoming covered with ash.
    >
    You over in Olivenhain?

    I'm here in O'side and its a clear, sunny day. Kinda bizarre sitting here at the computer in the sun
    as big chunks of the county are burning!

    Mike
     
  3. Kurgan Gringioni wrote:

    >
    > Last night, the wind was blowing the smoke south, so we could see. I've got a nice view from the
    > deck - can see a long ways. At sunset, one of the large hills, which had smoke behind it all day,
    > suddenly was smoking itself. You could see houses below, three quarters of the way down the hill -
    > the setting sun was reflecting brightly off the glass. Still no flames though, just smoke.
    >
    > Went back inside, made some phone calls. 30 minutes later it was dark. Look outside - I could see
    > flames now. The smoke was bright orange (reflecting light from the flames). The flames had moved
    > below the elevation where I had seen the light reflecting off the glass of the houses - it seems
    > like they had been consumed within that half hour.
    >
    > Today the wind has changed and the sky is yellowish brown. Sunlight reflecting off some stainless
    > steel items in my home is orange and the walls have an orange tint to them as a result. Can't see
    > the flames, there's too much smoke in the way.
    >
    > The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco w/ a fire sprinkler system
    > so it's not likely to burn. But my Dumbass Neighbor has 40 foot eucalyptus and pine trees. We live
    > on the edge of a brush-filled canyon - you'd think he'd have the brains to do something about all
    > the fuel he's got growing around and over his house.
    >
    > The ground is becoming covered with ash.

    This is just too awful. Best to you and yours, and everyone else who could be in harm's way.

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS Brooklyn, NY 718-258-5001 http://www.dentaltwins.com
     
  4. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On 10/27/03 12:11 PM, in article [email protected], "Kurgan
    Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > outside right now.
    >
    >
    > Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    >
    >> Hey Henry, those fires anywhere near you? Hope not. Great picture:
    > http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&u=/031026/480/ny11310262336&e=2
    >
    >
    > Last night, the wind was blowing the smoke south, so we could see. I've got a nice view from the
    > deck - can see a long ways. At sunset, one of the large hills, which had smoke behind it all day,
    > suddenly was smoking itself. You could see houses below, three quarters of the way down the hill -
    > the setting sun was reflecting brightly off the glass. Still no flames though, just smoke.
    >
    >
    > Went back inside, made some phone calls. 30 minutes later it was dark. Look outside - I could see
    > flames now. The smoke was bright orange (reflecting light from the flames). The flames had moved
    > below the elevation where I had seen the light reflecting off the glass of the houses - it seems
    > like they had been consumed within that half hour.
    >
    >
    > Today the wind has changed and the sky is yellowish brown. Sunlight reflecting off some stainless
    > steel items in my home is orange and the walls have an orange tint to them as a result. Can't see
    > the flames, there's too much smoke in the way.
    >
    >
    > The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco w/ a fire sprinkler system
    > so it's not likely to burn. But my Dumbass Neighbor has 40 foot eucalyptus and pine trees. We live
    > on the edge of a brush-filled canyon - you'd think he'd have the brains to do something about all
    > the fuel he's got growing around and over his house.
    >
    >
    > The ground is becoming covered with ash.
    >
    >

    It was right in my front yard..........

    http://www.printemp.net/fire.html
     
  5. H Squared

    H Squared Guest

    Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    >
    > The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco w/ a fire sprinkler system
    > so it's not likely to burn.

    it's not the house i'm worried about :(

    heather
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On 10/27/03 1:10 PM, in article [email protected], "Mike S."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> outside right now.
    >>
    >>
    >> Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hey Henry, those fires anywhere near you? Hope not. Great picture:
    >>
    > http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&u=/031026/480/ny11310262336&e=2
    >>
    >>
    >> Last night, the wind was blowing the smoke south, so we could see. I've
    > got a
    >> nice view from the deck - can see a long ways. At sunset, one of the large hills, which had smoke
    >> behind it all day, suddenly was smoking itself. You could see houses below, three quarters of the
    >> way down the hill - the
    > setting
    >> sun was reflecting brightly off the glass. Still no flames though, just smoke.
    >>
    >>
    >> Went back inside, made some phone calls. 30 minutes later it was dark.
    > Look
    >> outside - I could see flames now. The smoke was bright orange (reflecting light from the flames).
    >> The flames had moved below the elevation where I
    > had
    >> seen the light reflecting off the glass of the houses - it seems like they had been consumed
    >> within that half hour.
    >>
    >>
    >> Today the wind has changed and the sky is yellowish brown. Sunlight reflecting off some stainless
    >> steel items in my home is orange and the
    > walls
    >> have an orange tint to them as a result. Can't see the flames, there's too much smoke in the way.
    >>
    >>
    >> The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco w/
    > a
    >> fire sprinkler system so it's not likely to burn. But my Dumbass Neighbor
    > has
    >> 40 foot eucalyptus and pine trees. We live on the edge of a brush-filled canyon - you'd think
    >> he'd have the brains to do something about all the
    > fuel
    >> he's got growing around and over his house.
    >>
    >>
    >> The ground is becoming covered with ash.
    >>
    > You over in Olivenhain?
    >
    > I'm here in O'side and its a clear, sunny day. Kinda bizarre sitting here at the computer in the
    > sun as big chunks of the county are burning!
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
    I was evacuated as the flames came up to my front door. We were hosing down the roofs and
    surrounding vegetation.

    http://www.printemp.net/fire.html
     
  7. H Squared

    H Squared Guest

    Steve wrote:
    >

    > I was evacuated as the flames came up to my front door. We were hosing down the roofs and
    > surrounding vegetation.
    >
    > http://www.printemp.net/fire.html

    you can't just write a two line post about something like that!! when did it happen? were you able
    to return, or do you not know if your house is ok, or what??

    heather
     
  8. "h squared" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    > >
    > > The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco
    w/ a
    > > fire sprinkler system so it's not likely to burn.
    >
    > it's not the house i'm worried about :(
    >
    > heather

    The worst I saw was on CBS with Dan Rather. A man was crying on his hands and knees, it was
    reported that his children were burned in a car. I think two deaths were reported at that time. Out
    of 13, not sure if the children were the reported fatalities. I haven't heard from my buddies down
    there yet.

    B-
     
  9. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On 10/27/03 6:41 PM, in article [email protected], "Bruce Johnston"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "h squared" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>
    >> Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    >>>
    >>> The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco
    > w/ a
    >>> fire sprinkler system so it's not likely to burn.
    >>
    >> it's not the house i'm worried about :(
    >>
    >> heather
    >
    > The worst I saw was on CBS with Dan Rather. A man was crying on his hands and knees, it was
    > reported that his children were burned in a car. I think two deaths were reported at that time.
    > Out of 13, not sure if the children were the reported fatalities. I haven't heard from my buddies
    > down there yet.
    >
    > B-
    >
    >
    They waited till the last minute. They were overcome by smoke and veered off the road and crashed.
     
  10. Steve wrote:
    > On 10/27/03 12:11 PM, in article [email protected], "Kurgan
    > Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>outside right now.
    >>
    >>
    >>Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Hey Henry, those fires anywhere near you? Hope not. Great picture:
    >>
    >>http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&u=/031026/480/ny11310262336&e=2
    >>
    >>
    >>Last night, the wind was blowing the smoke south, so we could see. I've got a nice view from the
    >>deck - can see a long ways. At sunset, one of the large hills, which had smoke behind it all day,
    >>suddenly was smoking itself. You could see houses below, three quarters of the way down the hill -
    >>the setting sun was reflecting brightly off the glass. Still no flames though, just smoke.
    >>
    >>
    >>Went back inside, made some phone calls. 30 minutes later it was dark. Look outside - I could see
    >>flames now. The smoke was bright orange (reflecting light from the flames). The flames had moved
    >>below the elevation where I had seen the light reflecting off the glass of the houses - it seems
    >>like they had been consumed within that half hour.
    >>
    >>
    >>Today the wind has changed and the sky is yellowish brown. Sunlight reflecting off some stainless
    >>steel items in my home is orange and the walls have an orange tint to them as a result. Can't see
    >>the flames, there's too much smoke in the way.
    >>
    >>
    >>The fire is at least 10 miles away and my house is steel-framed/stucco w/ a fire sprinkler system
    >>so it's not likely to burn. But my Dumbass Neighbor has 40 foot eucalyptus and pine trees. We live
    >>on the edge of a brush-filled canyon - you'd think he'd have the brains to do something about all
    >>the fuel he's got growing around and over his house.
    >>
    >>
    >>The ground is becoming covered with ash.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > It was right in my front yard..........
    >
    > http://www.printemp.net/fire.html
    >

    Those eucalyptus trees burn very well, don't they?

    I notice you have a few in your yard, why didn't you cut them down?
     
  11. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On 10/27/03 8:09 PM, in article [email protected], "Richard Adams"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Steve wrote:
    >> On 10/27/03 12:11 PM, in article
    >>
    >> It was right in my front yard..........
    >>
    >> http://www.printemp.net/fire.html
    >>
    >
    > Those eucalyptus trees burn very well, don't they?
    >
    > I notice you have a few in your yard, why didn't you cut them down?
    >

    It was the "common" grounds. And for every bodies info.........

    As I told them on FOX Channel 6 here. The eucalyptus trees DID NOT burn.........hardly anywhere?

    The ground brush and shrubs burnt but ALL the eucalyptus trees I see around here and in the pictures
    I have seen have houses that where "torched" and eucalyptus trees 5 feet away that are still there.

    When I was able to leave here at 4:00pm today I drove down I15 and say numerous unburnt eucalyptus
    trees interspersed in a huge black abyss....

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/fires/images/ut_gallery2/gallery26.html

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/fires/images/ut_gallery2/gallery27.html

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/fires/images/ut_gallery2/gallery29.html
     
  12. Ken Papai

    Ken Papai Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BBC2E246.6C9C9%[email protected]...
    > On 10/27/03 1:10 PM, in article [email protected], "Mike
    S."
    >> >> Today the wind has changed and the sky is yellowish brown. Sunlight
    > >> reflecting off some stainless steel items in my home is orange and the
    > > walls
    > >> have an orange tint to them as a result. Can't see the flames, there's
    too
    > >> much smoke in the way.
    >surrounding vegetation.
    >
    > http://www.printemp.net/fire.html

    Goddam those are some scary images. Best to you, Zen to you.

    -Ken
     
  13. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Steve wrote:
    >>
    > I was evacuated as the flames came up to my front door. We were hosing down the roofs and
    > surrounding vegetation.
    >
    > http://www.printemp.net/fire.html

    Hope your things are okay. Glad you got out.
     
  14. "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BBC33A11.6CA03%[email protected]...
    > On 10/27/03 8:09 PM, in article [email protected],
    "Richard
    > Adams" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > I notice you have a few in your yard, why didn't you cut them down?
    > >
    >
    > It was the "common" grounds. And for every bodies info.........
    >
    > As I told them on FOX Channel 6 here. The eucalyptus trees DID NOT burn.........hardly anywhere?

    They burn, but it usually doesn't kill them (although fire kills houses). The acronym USFS stands
    for US Forestry Service:

    http://www.forestry.auburn.edu/sfnmc/class/class00/broadbeck/eucalyptus2.html

    EUCALYPTUS DESCRIPTION

    Eucalyptus is a deciduous tree that is native to Tasmania and southeastern Australia,
    and it generally grows to an average height of 98-180 feet tall although the trees have
    been know to grow to heights of 260 feet (USFS). The height growth in eucalyptus trees
    usually occurs in the first 5-10 years, therefore growing 60-70 percent of the tree's
    height by age 10(USFS). The leaves in eucalyptus trees are usually 4-11 inches long and
    the fruit is a dark green vase shaped woody capsule that is between .25 and 1 inch long
    that contains small seeds (Silvics Manual). The bark in eucalyptus trees is very shreddy
    and tends to be highly flammable (USFS).

    Eucalyptus in its native habitat grows in pure stands, and is an obligate initial
    community species, or meaning that it regenerates within and near the edges of
    plantations. It seldom invades open fields due to the intense competition it often
    encounters from other early successional weeds (Silvics Manual). Fire is a part of
    eucalyptus communities and eucalyptus has evolved using fire due to the fact that
    eucalyptus is highly flammable because of its bark, heavy litter fall, and its flammable
    oils located in its leaves (USFS). Eucalyptus trees are seldom killed by fire and have
    adapted seed capsules and juvenile leaves that can resist the fire, although there are
    few if any positive effects of fire other than reducing fuel build up (USFS).

    <snip><end>

    As an aside, a friend of mine who lived in Alpine owned a house surrounded by trees. He's got
    nothing right now but his car and the shirt on his back. I feel bad for him, but honestly, he can't
    really blame anyone but himself. And no, I won't say anything to him until he rebuilds, then I'll
    put pressure on him to clearcut.

    The various fire departments around here typically recommend brush clearing of at least 100 feet
    from any home in order to be considered 'safe'.
     
  15. "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BBC33A11.6CA03%[email protected]...
    > > On 10/27/03 8:09 PM, in article [email protected],
    > "Richard
    > > Adams" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I notice you have a few in your yard, why didn't you cut them down?
    > > >
    > >
    > > It was the "common" grounds. And for every bodies info.........
    > >
    > > As I told them on FOX Channel 6 here. The eucalyptus trees DID NOT burn.........hardly anywhere?
    >
    >
    >
    > They burn, but it usually doesn't kill them (although fire kills houses).
    The
    > acronym USFS stands for US Forestry Service:
    >
    >
    >
    http://www.forestry.auburn.edu/sfnmc/class/class00/broadbeck/eucalyptus2.html
    >
    > EUCALYPTUS DESCRIPTION
    >
    > Eucalyptus is a deciduous tree that is native to Tasmania and southeastern Australia,
    > and it generally grows to an average height of
    98-180
    > feet tall although the trees have been know to grow to heights of 260 feet (USFS). The height
    > growth in eucalyptus trees usually occurs in the first 5-10 years, therefore growing 60-70 percent
    > of the tree's height by age 10(USFS). The leaves in eucalyptus trees are usually 4-11 inches long
    > and the fruit is a dark green vase shaped woody capsule that is between .25
    and 1
    > inch long that contains small seeds (Silvics Manual). The bark in
    eucalyptus
    > trees is very shreddy and tends to be highly flammable (USFS).
    >
    > Eucalyptus in its native habitat grows in pure stands, and is
    an
    > obligate initial community species, or meaning that it regenerates within
    and
    > near the edges of plantations. It seldom invades open fields due to the intense competition it
    > often encounters from other early successional
    weeds
    > (Silvics Manual). Fire is a part of eucalyptus communities and eucalyptus has evolved using fire
    > due to the fact that eucalyptus is highly flammable because of its bark, heavy litter fall, and
    > its flammable oils located in
    its
    > leaves (USFS). Eucalyptus trees are seldom killed by fire and have
    adapted
    > seed capsules and juvenile leaves that can resist the fire, although there are few if any positive
    > effects of fire other than reducing fuel build up (USFS).
    >
    > <snip><end>
    >
    >
    >
    > As an aside, a friend of mine who lived in Alpine owned a house surrounded
    by
    > trees. He's got nothing right now but his car and the shirt on his back. I feel bad for him, but
    > honestly, he can't really blame anyone but himself.
    And
    > no, I won't say anything to him until he rebuilds, then I'll put pressure
    on
    > him to clearcut.
    >
    > The various fire departments around here typically recommend brush
    clearing
    > of at least 100 feet from any home in order to be considered 'safe'.

    No shit, I been clearing brush, old growth, dead pines, eucalyptus, manzanita for years. New county
    ordinance calls for madatory 30 foot clearence which isn't bad but really a drop in the bucket and
    not enough considering how dense the trees are here. I haven't reached my goals yet but I hope to
    eventually clear enough to make things a lot more safe. I can't say the same for the idiots who live
    nextdoor and across the street. I have burned a lot of eucalyptus limbs on the burn pile and that
    stuff is truely scary when it goes up.
     
  16. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    > As an aside, a friend of mine who lived in Alpine owned a house surrounded by trees. He's got
    > nothing right now but his car and the shirt on his back. I feel bad for him, but honestly, he
    > can't really blame anyone but himself. And no, I won't say anything to him until he rebuilds, then
    > I'll put pressure on him to clearcut.
    >
    > The various fire departments around here typically recommend brush clearing of at least 100 feet
    > from any home in order to be considered 'safe'.

    The problem with Eucalyptus from a fuel load pov is its litter: oily leaves, bark, and, to some
    extent, the seed pods. The trees don't typically burn, an irony that became apparent to me after the
    big freeze and apparent die-off of Eucalyptus in the Berkeley Hills when I was a kid: they cut down
    a lot of the trees and tried to give it away for firewood. You needed an oxyacetylene torch to start
    that sucker up. It's possible there's still a hunk of that stuff under my mom's backporch -- it was
    basically indestructible. Ought to be dry by now, though.

    As a practical issue, certain other kinds of brushy vegetation is even worse than Eucalyptus. And
    while it's always a good idea to clear space around your house it's unfortunately not always enough.
    When the Santa Ana's blow, bad things happen and the fuel load may not matter that much. That
    satellite photo that Ewoud pointed to showed the typical October pattern when the humidity drops to
    single digits.

    I was in Berkeley during the October 1991 fire when 3300 houses and apartments burned.
     
  17. On 10/28/2003 12:16 AM, in article [email protected], "Robert Chung"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was in Berkeley during the October 1991 fire when 3300 houses and apartments burned.

    I remember watching that fire from the roof of my apartment in San Francisco.

    I also remember watching the 1981/82 (I forget which year) Malibu Canyon fire ...

    With both, there was so much smoke, it seemed like dusk at 2:00 pm, and the sun appeared to be about
    3-times it's normal size (from the distortion and glow).

    --
    Steven L. Sheffield stevens at veloworks dot com veloworks at worldnet dot ay tea tee dot net bellum
    pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea aye tee why you ti
    ay aitch aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you double-yew double-ewe
    dot veloworks dot com [four word] slash
     
  18. Bruce Johnston wrote:

    > "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>"Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:BBC33A11.6CA03%[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>On 10/27/03 8:09 PM, in article [email protected],
    >>
    >>"Richard
    >>
    >>>Adams" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I notice you have a few in your yard, why didn't you cut them down?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>It was the "common" grounds. And for every bodies info.........
    >>>
    >>>As I told them on FOX Channel 6 here. The eucalyptus trees DID NOT burn.........hardly anywhere?
    >>
    >>They burn, but it usually doesn't kill them (although fire kills houses).
    >
    > The acronym USFS stands for US Forestry Service:
    >>
    >
    > http://www.forestry.auburn.edu/sfnmc/class/class00/broadbeck/eucalyptus2.html
    >
    >>EUCALYPTUS DESCRIPTION
    [snip]
    >>
    >>
    >>As an aside, a friend of mine who lived in Alpine owned a house surrounded by trees. He's got
    >>nothing right now but his car and the shirt on his back. I feel bad for him, but honestly, he
    >>can't really blame anyone but himself. And no, I won't say anything to him until he rebuilds, then
    >>I'll put pressure on him to clearcut.
    >
    >>The various fire departments around here typically recommend brush clearing of at least 100 feet
    >>from any home in order to be considered 'safe'.
    >
    >
    > No shit, I been clearing brush, old growth, dead pines, eucalyptus, manzanita for years. New
    > county ordinance calls for madatory 30 foot clearence which isn't bad but really a drop in the
    > bucket and not enough considering how dense the trees are here. I haven't reached my goals yet but
    > I hope to eventually clear enough to make things a lot more safe. I can't say the same for the
    > idiots who live nextdoor and across the street. I have burned a lot of eucalyptus limbs on the
    > burn pile and that stuff is truely scary when it goes up.

    People in the Santa Cruz area are often warned to clean up under their euc's where bark and leaves
    have accumulated enmasse. A few trees were cut down at a friends church a few years ago and we made
    firewood from it (very hard splitting wood because of the amount of resin in it) Burns like gasoline
    when it gets going and burns long. A CDF controlled brush burn in Wilder Park killed a few trees a
    few years back. By the looks of things they're trying to weed them out. I don't know why they don't
    just take saws in and whack 'em as they're a non-native species anyway.
     
  19. "Richard Adams" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Bruce Johnston wrote:
    >
    > > "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>"Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>news:BBC33A11.6CA03%[email protected]...
    > >>
    > >>>On 10/27/03 8:09 PM, in article [email protected],
    > >>
    > >>"Richard
    > >>
    > >>>Adams" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>I notice you have a few in your yard, why didn't you cut them down?
    > >>>>
    > >>>
    > >>>It was the "common" grounds. And for every bodies info.........
    > >>>
    > >>>As I told them on FOX Channel 6 here. The eucalyptus trees DID NOT burn.........hardly
    > >>>anywhere?
    > >>
    > >>They burn, but it usually doesn't kill them (although fire kills
    houses).
    > >
    > > The acronym USFS stands for US Forestry Service:
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    http://www.forestry.auburn.edu/sfnmc/class/class00/broadbeck/eucalyptus2.html
    > >
    > >>EUCALYPTUS DESCRIPTION
    > [snip]
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>As an aside, a friend of mine who lived in Alpine owned a house
    surrounded
    > >>by trees. He's got nothing right now but his car and the shirt on his
    back. I
    > >>feel bad for him, but honestly, he can't really blame anyone but
    himself.
    > >>And no, I won't say anything to him until he rebuilds, then I'll put
    pressure
    > >>on him to clearcut.
    > >
    > >>The various fire departments around here typically recommend brush clearing of at least 100 feet
    > >>from any home in order to be considered
    'safe'.
    > >
    > >
    > > No shit, I been clearing brush, old growth, dead pines, eucalyptus, manzanita for years. New
    > > county ordinance calls for madatory 30 foot clearence which isn't bad but really a drop in the
    > > bucket and not enough considering how dense the trees are here. I haven't reached my goals yet
    but
    > > I hope to eventually clear enough to make things a lot more safe. I
    can't
    > > say the same for the idiots who live nextdoor and across the street. I
    have
    > > burned a lot of eucalyptus limbs on the burn pile and that stuff is
    truely
    > > scary when it goes up.
    >
    > People in the Santa Cruz area are often warned to clean up under their euc's where bark and leaves
    > have accumulated enmasse. A few trees were cut down at a friends church a few years ago and we
    > made firewood from it (very hard splitting wood because of the amount of resin in it) Burns like
    > gasoline when it gets going and burns long. A CDF controlled brush burn in Wilder Park killed a
    > few trees a few years back. By the looks of things they're trying to weed them out. I don't know
    > why they don't just take saws in and whack 'em as they're a non-native species anyway.

    Yeah and I think it's either Cypress or Juniper which is pretty impressive when it hits the burn
    pile as well.
     
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