OT ketchup on steak

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Nibbles, Feb 27, 2003.

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  1. Nibbles

    Nibbles Guest

    hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****

    if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"

    AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed to put shredded rubber on it
    if i were inclined that way....

    nibbles
     
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  2. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    nibbles wrote:
    > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    > ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    >
    > if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"

    I reckon you should tell her that if she was that bothered about going out with a bloke with class,
    she shouldn't be with you.
     
  3. John G

    John G Guest

    nibbles wrote:
    > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    > ketchup with my steak in a restaurant.

    Depends upon the "steak"....

    The typical [email protected] they serve in most places, who gives a sh!t might a well just smear it with puree
    of dogsh!t

    Now, if you are talking a _real_ steak something like a properly aged, delmonico cut of black angus,
    cooked "black & blue" over an open hard-wood fire, then I will simply need to shoot you in the head.
     
  4. crazy6r54

    crazy6r54 Guest

    R somewhere I seen the french put it on bad meat as a cover up the bad taste of the meat. I love A1
    on meat,Texas Toast,potatoes, fries, and just about anything you would put ketchup on.

    Fire up MTB 03
     
  5. >AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed to put shredded rubber on it
    >if i were inclined that way....

    That's as may be, but it's still rude. Just like asking for Tartar sauce in a fancy fish restaurant.
    If you want ketchup on your steak, go to McD's.

    Steve
     
  6. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    nibbles wrote:
    > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    > ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    >
    > if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"
    >
    > AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed to put shredded rubber on
    > it if i were inclined that way....
    >
    > nibbles

    why not put in on your salad too?

    Of course you are a classless idiot. But if you don't care what people think, then go for it.

    Penny
     
  7. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "nibbles" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    > ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    >
    > if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"
    >
    > AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed to put shredded rubber on
    > it if i were inclined that way....
    >
    > nibbles

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!
     
  8. Fish

    Fish Guest

    It depends on other stuff like what type of reasurrant it is how well its prapared etc but the
    generalisation is that if sumone spent hours cooking you a nice juicy steak then its kinda rude to
    ask if you can have sumthing to cover up/change the taste.
     
  9. Linus

    Linus Guest

    On Thu, 27 Feb 2003 19:23:46 +0100, "nibbles" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    >ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    >
    >if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"
    >
    >AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed to put shredded rubber on it
    >if i were inclined that way....
    >
    >nibbles
    >
    Like you said, it's your money. Do what you want. Screw what people think. I don't think it's rude,
    just uncouth. Either way, if you have to put ketchup on steak, you are eating at the wrong place.
     
  10. Mr Chris

    Mr Chris Guest

    actually ketchup on steak is quite good. one of my favorite dishes is steak tartar with pomme frit
    and a abby beer, if the chef is really good he/she will zip up the ketchup with hot sauce

    mr chris
     
  11. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    mr chris wrote:
    > actually ketchup on steak is quite good. one of my favorite dishes is steak tartar with pomme frit
    > and a abby beer,

    *cough* steak tartare, pommes frites and abbey beer *cough*

    Despite having lived in mainland Europe for several years now, I've still not plucked up the courage
    to eat steak tartare. Suppose I should really try it, and I'm sure it's lovely, but it just goes
    against all my pre-conceived notions of food hygiene.
     
  12. roKeMS

    roKeMS New Member

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    Why go out and pay for something you can make at home??
    Steak and sauce. Grab the backyard BBq and cook up!

    Steak tartare is right up there with carpetbag steak (stuffed with oysters)

    Go 50:50 pepper and mushroom sauce. You'll never go back!
     
  13. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > mr chris wrote:
    > > actually ketchup on steak is quite good. one of my favorite dishes is
    steak
    > > tartar with pomme frit and a abby beer,
    >
    > *cough* steak tartare, pommes frites and abbey beer *cough*
    >
    > Despite having lived in mainland Europe for several years now, I've still not plucked up the
    > courage to eat steak tartare. Suppose I should really try it, and I'm sure it's lovely, but it
    > just goes against all my pre-conceived notions of food hygiene.
    >

    Dunno about that tartare thing. I did have a steak covered in peppercorn sauce in a English style
    restarant in Benedorm Spain (Florida for Brits) and again in Stockholm Sweden. Very good compliment
    to beef. One bonus, the Swedes have such an aversion to Russian Submarines once they found out we
    were "sub hunters" off the American ship our money became no good there and several bottles of fine
    French wine were sent over to our table. Quite a evening.

    Mike - but no to ketchup on steak. boor!
     
  14. Kathleen

    Kathleen Guest

    bomba wrote:
    > mr chris wrote:
    >
    >> actually ketchup on steak is quite good. one of my favorite dishes is steak tartar with pomme
    >> frit and a abby beer,
    >
    >
    > *cough* steak tartare, pommes frites and abbey beer *cough*
    >
    > Despite having lived in mainland Europe for several years now, I've still not plucked up the
    > courage to eat steak tartare. Suppose I should really try it, and I'm sure it's lovely, but it
    > just goes against all my pre-conceived notions of food hygiene.
    >

    From what I understand, eating properly handled and prepared steak tartare isn't as risky
    as eating plain old raw hamburger. On whole cuts of meat, such as what you'd use to prepare
    steak tartare, the contamination is present on the surface only (unless somebody's been
    tenderizing it with a fork). Because it's ground and the surfaces of many pieces mixed in
    together, hamburger can be massively contaminated all the way through, which is why health
    officials recommend cooking it brown all the way through. Probably the safest compromise
    for true carnivores is to skip the steak tartare and order a nice, thick blue steak.
    "Blue", by the way, is the step below rare on the doneness scale. Throw it on the grill
    just long enough to sear the surfaces (which also takes care of surface bacterial
    contamination), and serve it up with thin sliced raw onion, black pepper and horseradish.
    It's hard to get a properly done blue steak at most restaurant these days. You're lucky to
    score a medium rare at cheap places. Best (and safest) to learn to do it at home if you've
    got a taste for such things.

    Kathleen
     
  15. "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    | One bonus, the Swedes have such an aversion to Russian Submarines once they found out we were "sub
    | hunters" off the American ship our money became no good there and several bottles of fine French
    | wine were sent over to our table.

    I think the Swedes were merely closet Frogs and when they heard you were in the military they sent
    the wine as a surrender offering.
     
  16. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Fish <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It depends on other stuff like what type of reasurrant it is how well its prapared etc but the
    > generalisation is that if sumone spent hours cooking you a nice juicy steak then its kinda rude to
    > ask if you can have sumthing to cover up/change the taste.

    Bullshit - if I have _paid_ for that food, then it is mine to do with it WTF I please (condiment
    wise) when it arrives on the table. If the 'chef' is so thin skinned as to take my 'personal' (or
    lack thereof) taste 'personally',

    summink?!?

    I ain't treading on eggshells for someone else's ego sake.

    Shaun aRe - a sprinkle of chopped chile peeper and fresh ground black pepper would be more my line,
    maybe with a blue cheese sauce too.
     
  17. Mr. E. Mann

    Mr. E. Mann Guest

    "nibbles" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    > ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    >
    > if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"
    >
    > AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed to put shredded rubber on
    > it if i were inclined that way....
    >
    > nibbles
    >
    >

    I would have asked for a hamburger instead. I don't care for steak.
     
  18. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Mr. E. Mann" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "nibbles" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask for
    > > ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    > >
    > > if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"
    > >
    > > AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed
    to
    > > put shredded rubber on it if i were inclined that way....
    > >
    > > nibbles
    > >
    > >
    >
    > I would have asked for a hamburger instead. I don't care for steak.

    I make my living feeding people. If you go to a _really_good_ restaurant (and I don't mean Denny's)
    and pay the big bucks for a feed then it's kinda implied that you are prepared to pay for the
    flavour and taste as that one particular chef does it. After all, a prime piece of beef is a prime
    piece of beef. It's only how each restaurant cooks it that separates establishments.

    So,.......... if you add ketchup, you are not only adding a blob of bad tasting generic reddish
    gunge on your tasty steak, you are destroying the carefully crafted flavours and taste sensation
    that has been prepared for you by a chef that has spent years perfecting his craft and technique and
    abilities.

    So,..... It's rude, even highly insulting, to ask for ketchup at a classy restaurant. It's perfectly
    excusable and possibly even essential at PizzaHut where a spotty 17 year old fast-cooked your steak
    by dropping it into the deep fryer for a minute or two....

    Westie
     
  19. Spider

    Spider Guest

    "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Mr. E. Mann" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "nibbles" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > >
    > > > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask
    > > > for ketchup with my steak in a restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    > > >
    > > > if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"
    > > >
    > > > AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be allowed
    > to
    > > > put shredded rubber on it if i were inclined that way....
    > > >
    > > > nibbles
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > > I would have asked for a hamburger instead. I don't care for steak.
    >
    > I make my living feeding people. If you go to a _really_good_ restaurant (and I don't mean
    > Denny's) and pay the big bucks for a feed then it's kinda implied that you are prepared to pay for
    > the flavour and taste as that one particular chef does it. After all, a prime piece of beef is a
    > prime piece of beef. It's only how each restaurant cooks it that separates establishments.

    And my decision to put something on my steak effects them how? Who is paying who to cook the meal?

    When the chef pays me to eat his "creation," then we'll talk about who gets to decide who puts what
    where. BTW, I used to work in the food service industry myself. In a nice place, where the customer
    was always right, and if I wanted a tip, I'd get the damn ketchup if the guy wanted it. If he's
    laying down $40 for a plate of food, who am *I* to tell him what he can put on it?

    > So,.......... if you add ketchup, you are not only adding a blob of bad tasting generic reddish
    > gunge on your tasty steak, you are destroying the carefully crafted flavours and taste sensation
    > that has been prepared for you by a chef that has spent years perfecting his craft and technique
    > and abilities.

    LOL! What does he care if I am a cretin? He gets paid the same whether I eat it with or without
    ketchup. That's why it's called the food *service* industry.

    > So,..... It's rude, even highly insulting, to ask for ketchup at a classy restaurant.

    And so what? If the waiter wants his tip, he'll bring the damn cholate sauce if I want it on there.
    And he wants his tip, LOL!

    > It's perfectly excusable and possibly even essential at PizzaHut where a spotty 17 year old
    > fast-cooked your steak by dropping it into the deep fryer for a minute or two....

    And acceptable anywhere money changes hands for food. That's the reality. If the chef doesn't like
    it, he can kiss my butt. Really - where do these prima donnas get off - they are working in a
    service industry. If they don't like those terms, they can go get a real job somewhere.

    Spider
     
  20. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Spider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Mr. E. Mann" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > "nibbles" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > > >
    > > > > hi all. this is ot. but i thought it may amuse you.. my missus reckons that its rude to ask
    > > > > for ketchup with my steak in
    a
    > > > > restaurant. i reckon thats bull****
    > > > >
    > > > > if you reckon she`s wrong just reply "w" if you reckon she`s right, reply "r"
    > > > >
    > > > > AFAIC if i pay restaurant prices for a steak, then i should be
    allowed
    > > to
    > > > > put shredded rubber on it if i were inclined that way....
    > > > >
    > > > > nibbles
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > I would have asked for a hamburger instead. I don't care for steak.
    > >
    > > I make my living feeding people. If you go to a _really_good_
    restaurant
    > > (and I don't mean Denny's) and pay the big bucks for a feed then it's
    kinda
    > > implied that you are prepared to pay for the flavour and taste as that
    one
    > > particular chef does it. After all, a prime piece of beef is a prime
    piece
    > > of beef. It's only how each restaurant cooks it that separates establishments.
    >
    > And my decision to put something on my steak effects them how? Who is paying who to cook the meal?

    Obviously your money would be wasted if you spent it at the kind of restaurant that I am talking
    about. I'm not saying that you can't do it or shouldn't do it, I'm just trying to explain why it
    might be considered rude. Chefs in very highly regarded establishments WOULD be offended. I have
    worked with some top-level chefs and not only would most of them be insulted but a couple would
    actually have you removed from the premises if you got them on a bad day. <laugh>

    >
    > When the chef pays me to eat his "creation," then we'll talk about who gets to decide who puts
    > what where. BTW, I used to work in the food service industry myself. In a nice place, where the
    > customer was always right, and if I wanted a tip, I'd get the damn ketchup if the guy wanted it.
    > If he's laying down $40 for a plate of food, who am *I* to tell him what he can put on it?

    Having worked in the industry I'm surprised that you don't know this already. Believe it or not,
    such places do exist. Of course being insanely wealthy, as with most things, allows you to get away
    with a lot. So even if the chef finds your ketchup request rude, he'll probably squirt it right on
    the plate for you if it's worth it to him. But that's no surprise, is it?

    > > So,.......... if you add ketchup, you are not only adding a blob of bad tasting
    generic
    > > reddish gunge on your tasty steak, you are destroying the carefully
    crafted
    > > flavours and taste sensation that has been prepared for you by a chef
    that
    > > has spent years perfecting his craft and technique and abilities.
    >
    > LOL! What does he care if I am a cretin? He gets paid the same whether I eat it with or without
    > ketchup.

    Maybe not. Allowing cretins to eat at his establishment may taint the reputation and offend other
    more distingushed customers. So he may well NOT get paid the same in the longrun if he has
    ketchup-swilling cretins in his restaurant that effect the goodwill of his business. Image can be
    everything. Especially if Michelin stars are involved.

    > That's why it's called the
    > food *service* industry.

    You confuse "service" with "servility". While many people treat it as just a job there are those
    that take pride in what they do. You imply that a chef takes no personal pride or satisfaction in
    cooking something that receives praise and compliments from his customers. And if he can feel
    satisfaction and pride then he can feel insulted too. Just as you might feel insulted if someone
    criticised your handiwork or job performance. And ketchup says a big, fat, hairy "I don't like how
    this meal tastes".

    >
    > > So,..... It's rude, even highly insulting, to ask for ketchup at a classy
    restaurant.
    >
    > And so what?

    That's the whole point of this discussion, isn't it?

    >If the waiter wants his tip, he'll bring the damn cholate sauce if I want it on there. And he wants
    >his tip, LOL!
    >
    > > It's perfectly excusable and possibly even essential at PizzaHut where a spotty 17 year old
    > > fast-cooked your steak by dropping it into the deep
    fryer
    > > for a minute or two....
    >
    > And acceptable anywhere money changes hands for food. That's the reality. If the chef doesn't like
    > it, he can kiss my butt. Really - where do these prima donnas get off - they are working in a
    > service industry. If they don't like those terms, they can go get a real job somewhere.

    Why be so hateful towards somone that cares about their job? I'm not defending the primadonnas that
    are out there, but they are there in _any_ business. I suppose you must insult the new girl behind
    the counter at McDonalds that gives a genuine cheerful and friendly "Hello" because you're not
    paying for that?

    Westie
     
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