OT - Larry la Prise

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by The Big Baguett, Jan 31, 2003.

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  1. Jazz News carries the story of the death last week of Larry La Prise at the age of 93. He was best
    known as the man who wrote the Hokey Cokey. Apparently, he gave his family trouble to the end. They
    got his coffin ready (I guess they'd call it his casket). They put his left leg in ... and that's
    when the trouble started.

    Oh, well -- it amused me.
    --
    The Big Baguette
     
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  2. W K

    W K Guest

    "The Big Baguette" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Jazz News carries the story of the death last week of Larry La Prise at the age of 93. He was best
    > known as the man who wrote the Hokey Cokey. Apparently, he gave his family trouble to the end.
    > They got his coffin ready (I guess they'd call it his casket). They put his left leg in ... and
    > that's when the trouble started.

    much googling made me think this was an entirely ficticious story.

    he was 83 and died in 1996
     
  3. Fishman

    Fishman Guest

    "W K" <[email protected]> wrote

    > much googling made me think this was an entirely ficticious story. he was 83 and died in 1996

    You boring git!!!
     
  4. TheNewJetLi

    TheNewJetLi New Member

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    JIMMY KENNEDY
    (1903 - 1984) songwriter
    Born Omagh, County Tyrone

    Brought up in Portstewart, County Derry, and educated at Trinity College Dublin. He taught for a while in England before taking up songwriting. He was prolific and successful. His first big success was 'The Teddy Bears' Picnic', followed by many others still popular today, including 'Red Sails in the Sunset', 'South of the Border', 'Play to Me, Gypsy' and 'Love Is Like a Violin'. He also wrote the 'Cokey-Cokey' (later called the 'Hokey-Cokey').

    Bing Crosby recorded nine of his songs and became a friend. He composed more than a thousand airs and won two Ivor Novello Awards for his contribution to British music. He was awarded an honorary degree from NUU, and the OBE. He lived in Greystones, County Wicklow, for some years in the seventies and died in hospital in Cheltenham, England, on 6 April 1984, survived by his wife, Elaine, two sons, and a daughter.

    Source: A Dictionary of Irish Biography, Henry Boylan (ed.), Gill & Macmillan, Dublin, 1998.
     
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