OT - Obnoxious customers & limits

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Julia Altshuler, Dec 17, 2005.

  1. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 14:50:57 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    replied:
    > "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > It is because I was an officer appointed to enforce the law
    > > and had a badge that gave me the authority. Don't take that
    > > as a smug answer. It was not as there was no accountability,
    > > because abuse of that authority could get me in trouble. The
    > > point is that that authority is what is missing with a clerk.
    > >

    > The point is, the clerk should be empowered to take care of the
    > really rude customers.


    They are empowered by seeking out their immediate supervisor or
    manager and handing off the sale. Many sales clerks overstep this
    simple empowerment because they will not be credited with the sale
    at the end of the situation, though. It's all about money.

    > There is no excuse for a person to be degraded by another.


    Sure there's an excuse! You, as a sale clerk, are there for the
    money; there are no other altruistic or spiritual reasons. If you
    can't handle the lone difficult customer that steps your way, then
    you need to find a research programming job that does not deal
    with John Q Public.

    > The boss should give some guidelines as there are some tough
    > customers, but foul language should be a stopper. At the very
    > least, the clerk should just walk away and get someone else to
    > keep an eye on the customer.


    The guidelines are already in place.

    > what if the clerk was your daughter or wife. How much do
    > you expect them to endure?


    As much as necessary to close that sale. At the end of a difficult
    sale, the clerk can move to the back of the store to check
    inventory and compose herself for the next customer.

    > Take away your badge and ticket book, How much would you
    > have put up with if you had no recourse for revenge?


    You're comparing apples and oranges, Ed. A constable/LEO is in
    charge of public safety, not simple sales of merchandise.

    The Ranger
     


  2. The Ranger wrote:

    > you need to find a research programming job that does not deal
    > with John Q Public.


    Where can I get one of those?

    Bob
     
  3. Curly Sue wrote:

    > At this point, if she wants to sent a boundary with this guy, all she
    > has to do is look him in the eye and firmly say "Sorry, I've got a
    > boyfriend."


    All she has to do is squinch up her face and say, "EWWWWW!"

    Bob
     
  4. Naomi

    Naomi Guest

    x-no-archive: yes


    > It might be useful to sit down with your boss after the holidays and gently
    > nudge him to set up some guidelines, so that everyone knows how he expects
    > them to act and just how much bullshit you're all required to take. Dealing
    > with the public in a service position probably requires that you take some,
    > but the description of this particular guy's behavior was pushing the
    > limits, from my point of view.
    >
    > Good luck. :)
    > -j


    I agree with this. Get with your boss and agree on what's the right way
    to deal with this. Also, keep a log of any dodgy interactions you may
    have with customers. It is quite common for irate customers-- or just
    people looking for a freebie-- to lie about what you did or said. But
    don't be obvious about keeping notes; it makes you look paranoid. Write
    it down as soon as you get home.

    When I've done retail, a certain number of customers have always come
    in with the idea that this is a game where they have to get the better
    of you and that you are trying to rip them off. Those people act that
    way everywhere they go. If your boss has the policy of throwing them a
    freebie or whatever just to placate them-- which is what it sounds like
    from the anecdotes you have mentioned-- you will have to go along with
    it.

    As for the sexual harrassment, I agree that it's the other employee who
    really has to decide what to do about it, but a good boss will show he
    has her back (so to speak) by being there occasionally and stepping in
    and waiting on that customer himself. This will give the customer the
    idea that he hasn't left a kid to mind the store, which a lot of them
    take as a ticket to do whatever they want.
     
  5. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On 18 Dec 2005 10:35:01 -0600, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <[email protected]_spammer.biz> asked:
    > The Ranger wrote:
    > > you need to find a research programming job that does not deal
    > > with John Q Public.
    > >

    > Where can I get one of those?


    MIT or Stanford.

    The Ranger
     
  6. Kathleen

    Kathleen Guest

    jacqui{JB} wrote:
    > "jacqui{JB}" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > [following up on my own post, regardless of it being bad form :)]
    >
    >
    >>Good luck. :)

    >
    >
    > One more thing. I suggest reading Gavin DeBecker's book, _The Gift of
    > Fear_. It will help you better learn to trust your danger radar and
    > determine who coming into your shop may be a real threat and who is just an
    > obnoxious asshole.


    I second the recommendation. I thought it offered incredibly valuable
    insights into real-world threat assessment and appropriate responses.

    Kathleen
     
  7. Ophelia wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>"Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>
    >>>"RoR" <[email protected]> wrote

    >>
    >>>>They should have defended you. They have a responsibility to treat
    >>>>you with dignity and
    >>>>respect and to defend you, especially since you informed them about
    >>>>the situation. It's
    >>>>not like they were blind-sided with the call.
    >>>
    >>>Rick, please will you explain 'blind-sided?

    >>
    >>That's when you don't see something coming, it comes right
    >>outta the blue (you have that expression?) ...

    >
    >
    > Yes! Thank you:))
    >
    > if she hadn't
    >
    >>mentioned it and they had no clue what the customer was talking
    >>about when he called, that's blind sided, to them it came out of
    >>nowhere. Well, she did, and it didn't, they were aware why he
    >>was calling.
    >>
    >>Clear as mud? (smile)

    >
    >
    > LOL thanks nancy
    >
    > Perhaps you can clear up another mystery while you are at it?
    >
    > Jones! I can't remember exactly where it fits into a sentence but it
    > goes something like 'I Jonesed it' ???
    >
    >


    when you have a craving for something, you "have a jones" for it. I
    don't know the etymology, though.


    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  8. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On 17 Dec 2005 21:05:28 -0800, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Gregory Morrow wrote:
    >
    >> EchoSierra [X-No-Archive] wrote:
    >> > It's VERY hard for an employer to fight an unemployment insurance claim
    >> > if there is a termination. They are put through almost 90% of the time
    >> > if the funds are in the right quarters.

    >
    >> WRONG...if an employee is terminated for "just cause" there is very
    >> little chance that said employee will be deemed eligible for
    >> unemployment insurance...

    >
    >this is best to look up the cases and laws in each particular state.
    >
    >for example, in one state, pennsylvania, you cannot be fired for being
    >incompetent.
    >it's not the employee's fault but the employer's for hiring someone who
    >cannot do the job in the first place. strange but a true paradox, this
    >here thingee.


    You're talking apples and oranges here. One is whether an employee
    can get unemployment benefits if fired, the other is whether employees
    can be fired at all.

    I thought that in the US, with the exception of contract employees and
    some discrimination situations, employment is "at will." I.e., the
    employee can quit at any time and the employer can let the employees
    go at any time. If a convenience store hires someone it's hard to
    believe that the store would be obligated to employ that person for
    life.

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  9. Curly Sue wrote:

    > She'd better learn to handle this type of situation. First of all,
    > nothing indicates that the guy is sexually harassing her. He's
    > flirting with her and seeing if she is responsive. Don't blame him;
    > if you are able to see how the fellow might think that she's
    > flirtatious, then what is he supposed to think? Maybe he thinks she
    > IS interested in him and, from his POV, why not?



    But a lot of men are P - I - G - S, Sue, a LOT them just DON'T get
    it...

    Just last night a guy tried to come onto a lesbian friend of mine, he
    would NOT leave her alone. I eventually had to intervene by saying "Hey
    pal, get the FOOK out of here and leave us alone...". I didn't like
    creating a scene but ya do what ya have to do. For lagniappe when he
    left and got into his car to drive away (the guy was drunk) I called
    911 and reported him for DUI...maybe this'll settle his hash for a
    while :)

    Another lesbian friend of mine just got done with a big sexual
    harrassment brouhaha at the Fortune 100 company for which she works.
    They fired her boss after he had been sexually harrassing her for years
    (knowing she was a lesbian)...this after YEARS of diversity training,
    anti - sexual harrassment "workshops", etc...so this Friday night
    before xmas he got to go home to the wife and kiddies and say, "Hey
    honey, guess what? I got canned at the age of 48 for sexual
    harrassment! So much for that 25 - year career!".

    Why can't these guys get a clue? It's not like sexual harrassment
    issues are a brand new topic of discussion or anything...go figger!


    > At this point, if she wants to sent a boundary with this guy, all she
    > has to do is look him in the eye and firmly say "Sorry, I've got a
    > boyfriend."



    Even better would be "Sorry, I've got genital herpes...".

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  10. Curly Sue wrote:
    > On 17 Dec 2005 21:05:28 -0800, "[email protected]"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Gregory Morrow wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>EchoSierra [X-No-Archive] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>It's VERY hard for an employer to fight an unemployment insurance claim
    >>>>if there is a termination. They are put through almost 90% of the time
    >>>>if the funds are in the right quarters.

    >>
    >>>WRONG...if an employee is terminated for "just cause" there is very
    >>>little chance that said employee will be deemed eligible for
    >>>unemployment insurance...

    >>
    >>this is best to look up the cases and laws in each particular state.
    >>
    >>for example, in one state, pennsylvania, you cannot be fired for being
    >>incompetent.
    >>it's not the employee's fault but the employer's for hiring someone who
    >>cannot do the job in the first place. strange but a true paradox, this
    >>here thingee.

    >
    >
    > You're talking apples and oranges here. One is whether an employee
    > can get unemployment benefits if fired, the other is whether employees
    > can be fired at all.
    >
    > I thought that in the US, with the exception of contract employees and
    > some discrimination situations, employment is "at will." I.e., the
    > employee can quit at any time and the employer can let the employees
    > go at any time. If a convenience store hires someone it's hard to
    > believe that the store would be obligated to employ that person for
    > life.
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!


    that is how it is in most states. Employers do not have to have a reason
    to fire you, even. As long as you were not fired *because* you are in a
    protected class, they can fire you for whatever reason they want, or for
    no reason at all.

    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  11. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    > I was taught years ago (but of course this was telephone customer
    > service)... if someone gets rude, as in to the point of cussing, ask him to
    > spell it. "I'm sorry, how do you spell that, sir?" They usually sputter
    > and run off like the simple minded pricks they are. But I have never run
    > into this in a face to face situation.


    I try to appreciate the position of a person in telephone service. When I was
    having problems with my ISP charging me for modem I didn't return (they had sent
    the new modem to the wrong address) I was totally frustrated. I had already
    called a dozen times over a period of months and spent hours on hold. One time I
    called and asked the person to just hand me over to her supervisor because I was
    probably going to be yelling and cursing and I knew it wasn't her fault. It was
    a problem with their system that needed to be addressed.


    > As for the chickie getting hit on, she's not dealing with it right,
    > either. She needs to tell the boss she won't take it. But then again, at
    > her age she might just be flattered by it and telling you she wants to
    > "hide" when what she really wants is for this guy to seek her out. I sure
    > hope he's not a serial killer.


    Sexual harassment is a dicey situation. We had sexual harassment seminars at
    work and one thing that was made very clear was that it has to be the victim who
    complained. No one else can approach the boss and complain on behalf of someone
    else. Let's face it, people have different perspectives on flirting. Office
    romances are a touchy topic. Personally, I think they should be avoided, and for
    a number of reasons. The office jerk can pester a coworker for a date and
    because she thinks he is a jerk the guy is not just interested, his repeated
    invitations are harassment. Yet, another guy might also ask her out several
    times and eventually she agrees to a date and they end up an item. I worked
    with a couple who met and married on the job. When I was at university, two of
    my classmates ended up marrying my professors. To even date a student these
    days is enough to get a professor fired.
     
  12. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "sarah bennett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:0Cgpf.36350$q%[email protected]
    > Ophelia wrote:
    >> "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>"Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"RoR" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>>>>They should have defended you. They have a responsibility to treat
    >>>>>you with dignity and
    >>>>>respect and to defend you, especially since you informed them about
    >>>>>the situation. It's
    >>>>>not like they were blind-sided with the call.
    >>>>
    >>>>Rick, please will you explain 'blind-sided?
    >>>
    >>>That's when you don't see something coming, it comes right
    >>>outta the blue (you have that expression?) ...

    >>
    >>
    >> Yes! Thank you:))
    >>
    >> if she hadn't
    >>
    >>>mentioned it and they had no clue what the customer was talking
    >>>about when he called, that's blind sided, to them it came out of
    >>>nowhere. Well, she did, and it didn't, they were aware why he
    >>>was calling.
    >>>
    >>>Clear as mud? (smile)

    >>
    >>
    >> LOL thanks nancy
    >>
    >> Perhaps you can clear up another mystery while you are at it?
    >>
    >> Jones! I can't remember exactly where it fits into a sentence but it
    >> goes something like 'I Jonesed it' ???

    >
    > when you have a craving for something, you "have a jones" for it. I
    > don't know the etymology, though.


    Thank you Sarah
     
  13. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 11:59:58 GMT, "Ophelia" <[email protected]>
    > replied:
    > [snip]
    >>Jones! [..]

    >
    > To want something in an uncontrollably compulsive way. "I was
    > Jonesin' for a piece of that Chocolate Decadence Instant Death!"


    Thanks:) I think I am getting the picture:) I am still curious as to
    how it got the name Jones though:)
     
  14. Curly Sue wrote:

    > On 17 Dec 2005 21:05:28 -0800, "[email protected]"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Gregory Morrow wrote:
    > >
    > >> EchoSierra [X-No-Archive] wrote:
    > >> > It's VERY hard for an employer to fight an unemployment insurance claim
    > >> > if there is a termination. They are put through almost 90% of the time
    > >> > if the funds are in the right quarters.

    > >
    > >> WRONG...if an employee is terminated for "just cause" there is very
    > >> little chance that said employee will be deemed eligible for
    > >> unemployment insurance...

    > >
    > >this is best to look up the cases and laws in each particular state.
    > >
    > >for example, in one state, pennsylvania, you cannot be fired for being
    > >incompetent.
    > >it's not the employee's fault but the employer's for hiring someone who
    > >cannot do the job in the first place. strange but a true paradox, this
    > >here thingee.

    >
    > You're talking apples and oranges here. One is whether an employee
    > can get unemployment benefits if fired, the other is whether employees
    > can be fired at all.
    >
    > I thought that in the US, with the exception of contract employees and
    > some discrimination situations, employment is "at will." I.e., the
    > employee can quit at any time and the employer can let the employees
    > go at any time. If a convenience store hires someone it's hard to
    > believe that the store would be obligated to employ that person for
    > life.



    Correct. Here in the States people are hired and fired "at will".
    That concept doesn't exist in some places, frex in certain European
    nations (France, Germany) firing someone is a very lengthy and
    expensive process, it can take months. This makes employers reluctant
    to even take on new hires. That's one of the reasons why their
    economies are in the crapper, no flexibility re: labor matters...

    OTOH in the UK it's much easier to fire someone and that is why the UK
    economy is healthy and dynamic...

    And it's easy to circumvent the "incompetent" aspect. All you have to
    do is document specific incidents and write the employees up, third
    time's the "charm". No employer is going to use a gross generalisation
    like "incompetent" to get rid of an employee...

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  15. On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 17:30:28 GMT, "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 11:59:58 GMT, "Ophelia" <[email protected]>
    > > replied:
    > > [snip]
    > >>Jones! [..]

    > >
    > > To want something in an uncontrollably compulsive way. "I was
    > > Jonesin' for a piece of that Chocolate Decadence Instant Death!"

    >
    > Thanks:) I think I am getting the picture:) I am still curious as to
    > how it got the name Jones though:)


    Because it would sound weird if you said you were Smithing for
    something is my guess. ; )

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  16. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > OTOH in the UK it's much easier to fire someone and that is why the UK
    > economy is healthy and dynamic...


    Here in the UK you have no protection for the first two years. After
    that there has to be a damned good reason to dismiss you. You have a
    lot of protection. Of course in some places they sack people before
    the 2 years are up and get someone new so they don't have to comply with
    the protection law
     
  17. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Thanks:) I think I am getting the picture:) I am still curious as to how
    > it got the name Jones though:)


    I imagine there was a guy named Jones who was suffering withdrawal
    from a drug and after that, people would say I'm Jonesin' ...
    nothing more.

    nancy
     
  18. Carol replied to Ophelia:

    >>I am still curious as to how it got the name Jones though:)

    >
    > Because it would sound weird if you said you were Smithing for
    > something is my guess. ; )


    Not weird at all. That would mean you were pounding metal on an anvil for
    it.

    Bob
     
  19. On 18 Dec 2005 11:43:07 -0600, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Carol replied to Ophelia:
    >
    > >>I am still curious as to how it got the name Jones though:)

    > >
    > > Because it would sound weird if you said you were Smithing for
    > > something is my guess. ; )

    >
    > Not weird at all. That would mean you were pounding metal on an anvil for
    > it.


    Go lie down by your dish, Terwilliger!

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  20. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 11:45:20 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> replied:
    > On 18 Dec 2005 11:43:07 -0600, "Bob Terwilliger" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > > Carol replied to Ophelia:
    > > > >I am still curious as to how it got the name Jones though:)
    > > > >
    > > > Because it would sound weird if you said you were Smithing for
    > > > something is my guess. ; )
    > > >

    > > Not weird at all. That would mean you were pounding metal on
    > > an anvil for it.
    > >

    > Go lie down by your dish, Terwilliger!
    >

    Don't be throwin' a bone his way! Squirt 'im in the nose with a
    water bottle and THEN send to his bed.

    The Ranger
     
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