OT - Obnoxious customers & limits

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Julia Altshuler, Dec 17, 2005.

  1. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Perhaps you can clear up another mystery while you are at it?
    >
    > Jones! I can't remember exactly where it fits into a sentence but it
    > goes something like 'I Jonesed it' ???


    A right-now hunger desire for food. "I'm jonesing for a pizza."
    Perhaps something you've not eaten for a while and you suddently get a
    jones for it. AFAIK.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-13-05 - RIP, Gerri
     


  2. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 17:30:28 GMT, "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 11:59:58 GMT, "Ophelia" <[email protected]>
    >> > replied:
    >> > [snip]
    >> >>Jones! [..]
    >> >
    >> > To want something in an uncontrollably compulsive way. "I was
    >> > Jonesin' for a piece of that Chocolate Decadence Instant Death!"

    >>
    >> Thanks:) I think I am getting the picture:) I am still curious as to
    >> how it got the name Jones though:)

    >
    > Because it would sound weird if you said you were Smithing for
    > something is my guess. ; )


    LOL
     
  3. On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 10:01:22 -0800, The Ranger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 11:45:20 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    > <[email protected]> replied:
    > > On 18 Dec 2005 11:43:07 -0600, "Bob Terwilliger" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > > > Carol replied to Ophelia:
    > > > > >I am still curious as to how it got the name Jones though:)
    > > > > >
    > > > > Because it would sound weird if you said you were Smithing for
    > > > > something is my guess. ; )
    > > > >
    > > > Not weird at all. That would mean you were pounding metal on
    > > > an anvil for it.
    > > >

    > > Go lie down by your dish, Terwilliger!
    > >

    > Don't be throwin' a bone his way! Squirt 'im in the nose with a
    > water bottle and THEN send to his bed.


    That *is* more humane that swatting him with a rolled up newspaper,
    isn't it? Besides, he'd probably like it.

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  4. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Perhaps you can clear up another mystery while you are at it?
    >>
    >> Jones! I can't remember exactly where it fits into a sentence but it
    >> goes something like 'I Jonesed it' ???

    >
    > A right-now hunger desire for food. "I'm jonesing for a pizza."
    > Perhaps something you've not eaten for a while and you suddently get a
    > jones for it. AFAIK.


    Thanks Barb
     
  5. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >
    >>Thanks:) I think I am getting the picture:) I am still curious as to how
    >>it got the name Jones though:)

    >
    >
    > I imagine there was a guy named Jones who was suffering withdrawal
    > from a drug and after that, people would say I'm Jonesin' ...
    > nothing more.
    >
    > nancy
    >
    >



    I was curious and tried to look it up once; what I found was that it
    came from "Jones" as a slang for heroin. So Jonesin' is an intense
    craving, such as drug withdrawl. Beyond that, the etymology has been
    lost in obscurity (nobody remember why heroin was called Jones).

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  6. "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> There is no excuse for a person to be degraded by another.

    >
    > Sure there's an excuse! You, as a sale clerk, are there for the
    > money; there are no other altruistic or spiritual reasons. If you
    > can't handle the lone difficult customer that steps your way, then
    > you need to find a research programming job that does not deal
    > with John Q Public.



    So it is OK if I degrade you, call you names, curse at you, as long as you
    are getting paid? Are you a prostitute? Handling the lone difficult
    customer can mean telling him to leave. Some custoemrs are not woth the
    profit you maymake on the sale. Sre, there are many egrees of difficult
    customers, but when you get to the extreme, money is not the deciding
    factor. There is a limit.



    >
    > As much as necessary to close that sale. At the end of a difficult
    > sale, the clerk can move to the back of the store to check
    > inventory and compose herself for the next customer.


    Bullshit! I'm not a very PC type of person, but there are limits to what
    one should endure. Bad behavior condoned just breeds more of the same.

    >
    >> Take away your badge and ticket book, How much would you
    >> have put up with if you had no recourse for revenge?

    >
    > You're comparing apples and oranges, Ed. A constable/LEO is in
    > charge of public safety, not simple sales of merchandise.


    The LEO is human. Some will take revenge in the form of writing tickets,
    making an arrest, or anything they have the power to do. My point is that
    he has the power, the retail sales clerk often does not. They should and
    must be able to take some control.

    If you are willing to take a string of profanities, be screamed at,
    harassed, and whatever else just to make a sale, you are probably getting
    what you deserve. Thank you and please come again. We value your
    patronage.
     
  7. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message >
    > I was curious and tried to look it up once; what I found was that it
    > came from "Jones" as a slang for heroin. So Jonesin' is an intense
    > craving, such as drug withdrawl. Beyond that, the etymology has been
    > lost in obscurity (nobody remember why heroin was called Jones).


    Thank you Bob
     
  8. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > > >

    > > Don't be throwin' a bone his way! Squirt 'im in the nose with a
    > > water bottle and THEN send to his bed.

    >
    > That *is* more humane that swatting him with a rolled up newspaper,
    > isn't it? Besides, he'd probably like it.
    >


    You want a human treatment for a dog? Hit yourself with the newspaper. I have a dog that
    I adopted from the pound. He is half German Shepherd and half Bouvier. I don't know how a
    cross between two of the smartest dog breeds could result in dimwit, but this guy is dumb. He
    was a year and a half old when I got him, and he was totally untrained, and no doubt had been
    abused by his previous owner. I threatened him with a rolled up newspaper one day and struck
    my one hand with it. I was able to get him to stop doing all sorts of things by hitting
    myself on the hand and threatening to do it to myself again. I never hit him with it so he
    doesn't even know what it feels like, but the threat of doing it to myself works wonders. :)
     
  9. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 18:25:29 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    replied:
    > "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > There is no excuse for a person to be degraded by another.
    > > >

    > > Sure there's an excuse! You, as a sale clerk, are there for the
    > > money; there are no other altruistic or spiritual reasons. If you
    > > can't handle the lone difficult customer that steps your way, then
    > > you need to find a research programming job that does not deal
    > > with John Q Public.
    > >

    > So it is OK if I degrade you, call you names, curse at you, as long
    > as you are getting paid? Are you a prostitute?


    As one salesman once quipped, "People know exactly what I am. It's
    only a matter of how much they're willing to pay me in commission
    that I care about." So, yes, Ed, commissioned salespeople are
    legalized prostitutes. Non-commissioned salespeople are stupid.

    > Handling the lone difficult customer can mean telling him to leave.


    No it does not... Ever. If you can't handle that lone "difficult
    customer," you are in the wrong line of business. If you find
    yourself experiencing an ever-increasing number of difficult
    customers, look inward to the problem; you're experiencing job
    burnout.

    Any salesclerk that tells a customer to leave has overstepped
    their job description. They are NOT empowered to do that and to
    counsels otherwise is doing them a disservice.

    > Some custoemrs are not woth the profit you maymake on
    > the sale. Sre, there are many egrees of difficult customers,
    > but when you get to the extreme, money is not the deciding
    >factor. There is a limit.


    Money _is always_ the deciding factor in sales. If there is a
    diminishing return on the sale of an item, then it must be made by
    someone higher than a line-report.

    A great example of just how far managers are willing to go is car
    salespeople. The ONLY two things a salesman (or saleswoman) is
    graded on is how many cars s/he sold at the end of the month and
    how much profit s/he brought into the company. The top salespeople
    take customer guff and turn it back into a final sale. The sales
    managers don't care if their reports are abused; it's a part of
    the business. If they can't handle it, they're dropped or they
    leave voluntarily.

    > > As much as necessary to close that sale. At the end of a difficult
    > > sale, the clerk can move to the back of the store to check
    > > inventory and compose herself for the next customer.
    > >

    > Bullshit! I'm not a very PC type of person, but there are limits
    > to what one should endure. Bad behavior condoned just breeds
    > more of the same.


    Maybe in your little portion of the universe but then we disagree
    on almost everything.

    > > > Take away your badge and ticket book, How much would you
    > > > have put up with if you had no recourse for revenge?
    > > >

    > > You're comparing apples and oranges, Ed. A constable/LEO is in
    > > charge of public safety, not simple sales of merchandise.
    > >

    > The LEO is human. Some will take revenge in the form of writing
    > tickets, making an arrest, or anything they have the power to do.
    > My point is that he has the power, the retail sales clerk often does
    > not. They should and must be able to take some control.


    The retail clerk has enough power to exact revenge in other ways.
    We've all seen clerks get abused. The greater the abuse the
    quicker the response from the community at large. And abuse is
    always controllable. Always.

    > If you are willing to take a string of profanities, be screamed
    > at, harassed, and whatever else just to make a sale, you are
    > probably getting what you deserve. Thank you and please
    > come again. We value your patronage.


    And that's all a business owner gives a flying hoot about at the
    end of every business day. Did she make enough sales to open up
    again tomorrow? If not, let's find the reasons and fix them. Most
    of the time that means firing a sales clerk (or two) and replacing
    them with the next group of expendable human resources.

    The Ranger
     
  10. I used to have a tech support job over the phone which fried my nerves.
    I didn't know anything about self esteem back then, but I've learned a
    lot about it recently. Now I don't put up with abuse. I speak up. I
    assert myself. If I were doing that job again, I would've told abusive
    customers that it's not my job to listen to them chew me out and that
    I'm not going to listen and take it. I would tell them that they don't
    have the right to treat me that way just because they're a customer.
    And if the boss fired me for standing up for myself, I would sue him
    for emotional abuse or something like that. I have started my own
    business, partly because I hate working for other people. I've now
    started to make some profit. When I eventually hire employees, I will
    treat them with respect and consideration, and if any customer tries to
    abuse an employee, I will tell them to f*ck off and die and we don't
    need their business.
     
  11. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 13:51:29 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> replied:
    > You want a human treatment for a dog? Hit yourself
    > with the newspaper. I have a dog that I adopted from
    > the pound. He is half German Shepherd and half Bouvier.
    > I don't know how a cross between two of the smartest
    > dog breeds could result in dimwit, but this guy is dumb.
    > He was a year and a half old when I got him, and he was
    > totally untrained, and no doubt had been abused by his
    > previous owner. I threatened him with a rolled up
    > newspaper one day and struck my one hand with it.
    > I was able to get him to stop doing all sorts of things by
    > hitting myself on the hand and threatening to do it to
    > myself again. I never hit him with it so he doesn't even
    > know what it feels like, but the threat of doing it to myself
    > works wonders. :)


    It's the combination of the sharp noise followed by the sudden
    movement that is making him stop any aberrant behaviors you are
    seeing. An aluminum can half-filled with marbles does the exact
    same thing. A spray bottle followed by "NO!" works the trick too.
    (Even for those breeds that are as dense as a box of rocks --
    Irish Setter and Cocker Spaniel are two that have had their brains
    bred thin -- water and voice will train them properly.)

    The Ranger
     
  12. Naomi

    Naomi Guest

    x-no-archive: yes


    Money _is always_ the deciding factor in sales.>>

    I think you're exaggerating this point. I have owned a retail business
    and worked in others. There are some customers who are more trouble
    than they are worth. Sometimes it's because they take away attention we
    need from other customers. Sometimes it's because they create an
    unpleasant atmosphere. Choosing not to deal with those customers is
    indeed done with overall profits in mind. However, you seem to be
    writing as if every individual sale was decided on whether or not we
    will get money out of that one person.
     
  13. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On 18 Dec 2005 11:25:29 -0800, [email protected] replied:
    > [..] I have started my own business, [..] and if any
    > customer tries to abuse an employee, I will tell them
    > to f*ck off and die and we don't need their business.


    What's the name of your company again? Just for the record.

    The Ranger
     
  14. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    > If you are willing to take a string of profanities, be screamed at,
    > harassed, and whatever else just to make a sale, you are probably getting
    > what you deserve. Thank you and please come again. We value your
    > patronage.
    >

    Yup.. that about describes most hospital corporations now and what the
    staff has to put up with.
     
  15. Carol wrote:

    >>> it would sound weird if you said you were Smithing for
    >>> something is my guess. ; )

    >>
    >> Not weird at all. That would mean you were pounding metal on an
    >> anvil for it.

    >
    > Go lie down by your dish, Terwilliger!


    Ain't gonna. *I* made sense out of your nonsense: YOU should be the one
    getting punished! :-รพ

    Bob
     
  16. Naomi

    Naomi Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    The Ranger wrote:

    >>> I think you're exaggerating this point.


    Yes and no; the owner/manager has to decide if the sale is costing
    MORE than it is bring in. If the _same_ customer always creates
    the exact same scene, then it will cause other sales to fail,
    which turns back to the bottom line. OTOH, if that customer is
    bring in a sizeable profit (special ordering products with every
    visit), then the difficulty of handling them is justified. It


    > I have owned a retail business and worked in others. There
    > are some customers who are more trouble than they are
    > worth. Sometimes it's because they take away attention we
    > need from other customers. Sometimes it's because they
    > create an unpleasant atmosphere. Choosing not to deal
    > with those customers is indeed done with overall profits
    > in mind.



    So how is this exaggerating my point? You verified it. It's all
    about money. >>

    "Yes and no" or "you verified my point"? With all respect, I think
    you're losing track of the argument here.
     
  17. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On 18 Dec 2005 11:29:50 -0800, "Naomi" <[email protected]>
    replied to my <[email protected]> comment:
    > > Money _is always_ the deciding factor in sales.>>
    > >

    > I think you're exaggerating this point.


    Yes and no; the owner/manager has to decide if the sale is costing
    MORE than it is bring in. If the _same_ customer always creates
    the exact same scene, then it will cause other sales to fail,
    which turns back to the bottom line. OTOH, if that customer is
    bring in a sizeable profit (special ordering products with every
    visit), then the difficulty of handling them is justified. It

    > I have owned a retail business and worked in others. There
    > are some customers who are more trouble than they are
    > worth. Sometimes it's because they take away attention we
    > need from other customers. Sometimes it's because they
    > create an unpleasant atmosphere. Choosing not to deal
    > with those customers is indeed done with overall profits
    > in mind.


    So how is this exaggerating my point? You verified it. It's all
    about money.

    > However, you seem to be writing as if every individual sale
    > was decided on whether or not we will get money out of
    > that one person.


    The individual sale is all part of the aggregate and contributes
    directly to total sales and revenue at the end of every shift. If
    the regular customer is bringing in a certain amount of money,
    then a little extra effort is called into play.

    My point to Ed was that an individual drone (salesclerk) does not
    have the authority to make those type of business decisions. If a
    customer is being too ornery, then s/he should bump the upset
    customer up a level. If s/he is so thin-skinned that they can
    handle confrontation of any type, then sales isn't the job for
    them. (And you'd be amazed at how many milk toasts are in sales.)

    The Ranger
     
  18. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 17:30:28 GMT, "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 11:59:58 GMT, "Ophelia" <[email protected]>
    >> replied:
    >> [snip]
    >>>Jones! [..]

    >>
    >> To want something in an uncontrollably compulsive way. "I was
    >> Jonesin' for a piece of that Chocolate Decadence Instant Death!"

    >
    >Thanks:) I think I am getting the picture:) I am still curious as to
    >how it got the name Jones though:)
    >


    Semantic origin unknown, but that's common for slang.
    http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=19961031
    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Jones


    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  19. Curly Sue wrote:
    > You're talking apples and oranges here. One is whether an employee
    > can get unemployment benefits if fired, the other is whether employees
    > can be fired at all.
    >
    > I thought that in the US, with the exception of contract employees and
    > some discrimination situations, employment is "at will." I.e., the
    > employee can quit at any time and the employer can let the employees
    > go at any time. If a convenience store hires someone it's hard to
    > believe that the store would be obligated to employ that person for
    > life.
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!


    And I tried so hard to explain too. The two ideas are somewhat
    connected.
    In this way they are both round and fruits unless you call an orange
    a "vegetable." And they are also disconnected. I can be fired at will
    but I can also collect unemployment if the firing was not justified
    by unemployment standards. Sometimes they are also connected
    in that what happens in the unemployment bureau might have
    ramifications back against the employer.

    Have you had a chance to read employment law? You really
    can't fire someone because you feel like it. Well, you can,
    but there are ramifications. What the employers say and what the
    laws are - happen to be two different things, like apples and oranges,
    as you originally said.

    It really depends on the state.
    Not all states are the same. California and New Jersey have good laws
    whereas Pennsylvania is rather barbaric with almost no rights for
    employees.

    But there are federal remedies as well as state concerns, so it gets
    tricky. What occurs at the state level may not be allowed at the
    federal level. So that's another wrinkle.

    And there are exceptions to the "at will." The employers do not
    advertise
    this but there are exceptions even in the most barbaric of states.

    And come to think of it, why should a convenience store not employ
    someone for life if business is good and that person does a good
    job? Your comment seems rather callous. Is this really what you mean?
     
  20. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On 18 Dec 2005 11:48:34 -0800, "Naomi" <[email protected]>
    replied:
    > > > I think you're exaggerating this point.

    > > Yes and no; [..]

    > "Yes and no" or "you verified my point"? With all respect,
    > I think you're losing track of the argument here.


    Where? Maybe I missed where I was "exaggerating."

    The manager/owner has the final say on whether a customer is
    costing them revenue or not. Nowhere in my examples does the
    salesclerk get to make that decision. Allowing salespeople (line
    staff) that latitude will tank sales for your business very
    quickly.

    The Ranger
     
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