OT: Photo Competition - Unsuccessful

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Stemc ©, Mar 3, 2004.

  1. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    Hi there,

    I entered my first photo competition last week, but I was unsuccessful of course. :) It was
    with Practical Photography magazine, and the theme was 'animal attractions.' I thought I had a
    good chance, as I got two dragonflies mating, and they were making a nice heart shape, but it
    wasn't to be.

    I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg

    They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)

    I took it whilst walking around Thrybergh Country Park, in Rotherham, last year. It's a nice walk
    around there, about 1.7 miles around a reservoir. At the moment, half of the path around the
    reservoir is closed off due to nesting birds or something like that.

    Oh well, next month's theme is 'Shapes,' so I'll see what I can come up with; and what walks I'll
    have to do to find a suitable image. Ideas welcome of course. ;-)

    Ste
     
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  2. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "stemc ©" <[email protected]> wrote

    > I entered my first photo competition last week, but I was unsuccessful of course. :) It was
    > with Practical Photography magazine, and the theme was 'animal attractions.' I thought I had a
    > good chance, as I got two dragonflies mating, and they were making a nice heart shape, but it
    > wasn't to be.
    >
    > I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    >
    > They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    > impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)

    Well, I'm not a photographer but to my uneducated mind that was better than some of the ones I
    saw in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition. What kind of glue did you use to stick
    them together?
     
  3. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    stemc © wrote:
    > Hi there,
    >
    > They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    > impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)
    >
    > Ste

    I wonder if this crop would have been better (hope you don't mind I rotated it and cropped it).

    http://www.ftscotland.co.uk/gallery/dragonflies_crop.jpg

    --
    Don`t Worry, Be Happy

    Sandy
    --

    E-Mail:- [email protected] Website:- http://www.ftscotland.co.uk IRC:- Sandyb in #rabble
    uk3.arcnet.vapor.com Port:6667 #Rabble Channel Website:- http://www.rabble.ftscotland.co.uk
    ICQ : 41266150
     
  4. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 19:01:30 GMT, stemc © wrote:

    >Hi there,
    >
    >I entered my first photo competition last week, but I was unsuccessful of course. :) It was
    >with Practical Photography magazine, and the theme was 'animal attractions.' I thought I had a
    >good chance, as I got two dragonflies mating, and they were making a nice heart shape, but it
    >wasn't to be.
    >
    >I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    >
    >They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    >impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)

    It means "needs better composition" IMO.

    That red smudge on the left isn't doing anything except distract. You have a leaf almost behind the
    male's wings and you've missed half the wings of the female.

    They are common blue damselflies (Enallagma cyathigerum) BTW. Much smaller and weaker fliers than
    dragon flies.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  5. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 19:45:11 GMT, Sandy wrote:

    >stemc © wrote:
    >> Hi there,
    >>
    >> They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    >> impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)
    >>
    >> Ste
    >
    >I wonder if this crop would have been better (hope you don't mind I rotated it and cropped it).
    >
    >http://www.ftscotland.co.uk/gallery/dragonflies_crop.jpg

    I cropped it almost exactly like that and cloned out the leaf behind the male, decided not to post
    it in the end. I must get back to my own pictures, there is another page to write.
    --
    Phil Cook
     
  6. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "AndyP" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | "stemc ©" <[email protected]> wrote
    |
    | > I entered my first photo competition last week, but I was unsuccessful
    of
    | > course. :) It was with Practical Photography magazine, and the theme
    was
    | > 'animal attractions.' I thought I had a good chance, as I got two dragonflies mating, and they
    | > were making a nice heart shape, but it
    wasn't
    | > to be.
    | >
    | > I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    | >
    | > They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    | > impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)
    |
    | Well, I'm not a photographer but to my uneducated mind that was better
    than
    | some of the ones I saw in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year
    exhibition.
    | What kind of glue did you use to stick them together?

    Thanks Andy, you're too kind! :) I missed last month's competition, which was 'patterns in the
    landscape,' and when I saw the winner and the shortlisted entries printed in the magazine, I was
    gutted because I thought most of them weren't that great. Oh well, I'll look forward to seeing what
    won this competition.

    It was a hot day when I took this photo, and every time I got close enough to take a photo, they all
    flew off. It was only because these two were mating that they 'stuck' around for so much (no glue
    involved, though the male might disagree!) ;-)

    Ste
     
  7. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "Sandy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | stemc © wrote:
    | > Hi there,
    | >
    | > They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    | > impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)
    | >
    | > Ste
    |
    | I wonder if this crop would have been better (hope you don't mind I
    rotated
    | it and cropped it).
    |
    | http://www.ftscotland.co.uk/gallery/dragonflies_crop.jpg
    |
    |
    | --
    | Don`t Worry, Be Happy
    |
    | Sandy

    No worries Sandy, anything that helps me in future is taken on on board. The only problem with this
    rotation and crop is that my eye is drawn to the yellow 'damselfly' (thanks for the correction
    Phil!), and due to my dodgy composition, I've chopped off its wings. I think this spoils this
    version more than it does in the original (where my own eye goes to the blue one).
    :-( If I'd framed the shot better, then I'd definitely agree with you
    though. ...but who am I to talk, my version was rejected! :)

    Thanks,

    Ste
     
  8. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 19:01:30 GMT, stemc © wrote:
    |
    | >Hi there,
    | >
    | >I entered my first photo competition last week, but I was unsuccessful of course. :) It was with
    | >Practical Photography magazine, and the theme
    was
    | >'animal attractions.' I thought I had a good chance, as I got two dragonflies mating, and they
    | >were making a nice heart shape, but it
    wasn't
    | >to be.
    | >
    | >I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    | >
    | >They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    | >impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)
    |
    | It means "needs better composition" IMO.

    I grabbed the shots as quick as I could before they flew off. It's definitely sloppy (the framing),
    but I couldn't do anything about the background as I was already stepping into a hedge and it was
    tricky leaning over far enough.

    | That red smudge on the left isn't doing anything except distract. You have a leaf almost behind
    | the male's wings and you've missed half the wings of the female.

    In hindsight, I would crop from the left, just enough for that red smudge on the left to be removed.
    I can't do anything about the female's wings now, but it goes without saying that I'd not chop them
    off given the chance again! ;-)

    | They are common blue damselflies (Enallagma cyathigerum) BTW. Much smaller and weaker fliers than
    | dragon flies.

    Enallagma cyathigerum? I knew that! :) Thanks for the info.

    | --
    | Phil Cook

    Ste
     
  9. Chris Street

    Chris Street Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 19:01:30 GMT, "stemc ©" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi there,
    >
    >I entered my first photo competition last week, but I was unsuccessful of course. :) It was
    >with Practical Photography magazine, and the theme was 'animal attractions.' I thought I had a
    >good chance, as I got two dragonflies mating, and they were making a nice heart shape, but it
    >wasn't to be.

    Don't give up. It's amazing the sort of tat that can actually win a competition.

    http://www.vividlight.com/articles/1920.htm

    I nearly died of shock.

    >
    >I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    >
    >They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    >impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)

    As others said it needs more work on composition and framing. Taking semi macro photos of insects is
    damn tricky and needs a lot of practice so don't feel too bad about it.

    One trick especially with butterflies is to take the photos first thing when it's cold and they are
    not very active. Paul S an tell you about me chasing butterflies round the Gower - four rolls and I
    got one usable shot which was crap. That's kinda normal for me.

    >
    >I took it whilst walking around Thrybergh Country Park, in Rotherham, last year. It's a nice walk
    >around there, about 1.7 miles around a reservoir. At the moment, half of the path around the
    >reservoir is closed off due to nesting birds or something like that.

    I used to work at Thrybergh steel mill not that far away - nice to know the park is still
    going strong.
    >
    >Oh well, next month's theme is 'Shapes,' so I'll see what I can come up with; and what walks I'll
    >have to do to find a suitable image. Ideas welcome of course. ;-)
    >
    >Ste
    >

    --
    79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot. The other 42% are made up later on. In Warwick -
    looking at flat fields and that includes the castle.
     
  10. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "Chris Street" <despam.c[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 19:01:30 GMT, "stemc ©" <[email protected]> wrote:
    |
    | >Hi there,
    | >
    | >I entered my first photo competition last week, but I was unsuccessful of course. :) It was with
    | >Practical Photography magazine, and the theme
    was
    | >'animal attractions.' I thought I had a good chance, as I got two dragonflies mating, and they
    | >were making a nice heart shape, but it
    wasn't
    | >to be.
    |
    | Don't give up. It's amazing the sort of tat that can actually win a competition.
    |
    | http://www.vividlight.com/articles/1920.htm
    |
    | I nearly died of shock.

    Nice one Chris, I bet you enjoyed using all that film! :) ...but spare a thought for that poor chef
    too, working til 8am! Yikes!

    | >I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    | >
    | >They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    | >impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)
    |
    | As others said it needs more work on composition and framing. Taking semi macro photos of insects
    | is damn tricky and needs a lot of practice so don't feel too bad about it.
    |
    | One trick especially with butterflies is to take the photos first thing when it's cold and they
    | are not very active. Paul S an tell you about me chasing butterflies round the Gower - four rolls
    | and I got one usable shot which was crap. That's kinda normal for me.

    Yes, I really do need to get up earlier! My typical weekend is to get up at 11am or later, then get
    out at about 2pm. Obviously, in the summer months, this makes for crap photography due to the angle
    of the sun etc, and as you point out, this is when these little creatures are at their most active,
    which isn't good when you're trying to photograph them! If they were less active, I'd then have more
    time to frame them better - my photography is all about percentages! :)

    | >I took it whilst walking around Thrybergh Country Park, in Rotherham,
    last
    | >year. It's a nice walk around there, about 1.7 miles around a reservoir. At the moment, half of
    | >the path around the reservoir is closed off due to nesting birds or something like that.
    |
    | I used to work at Thrybergh steel mill not that far away - nice to know the park is still
    | going strong.

    My girlfriend's family home is in East Dene, not far from there. In fact, it's probably the same
    steelworks that we can hear in the night time.

    <snip>

    Ste
     
  11. Chris Street wrote:

    > As others said it needs more work on composition and framing. Taking semi macro photos of insects
    > is damn tricky and needs a lot of practice so don't feel too bad about it.

    I doubt if I could take a shot that good. What I like about landscapes is that they stay still while
    you take the picture, so you can usually spend as long as you like composing it. Of course the light
    can sometimes change very fast, but at least the scenery doesn't move.

    > One trick especially with butterflies is to take the photos first thing when it's cold and they
    > are not very active. Paul S an tell you about me chasing butterflies round the Gower - four rolls
    > and I got one usable shot which was crap. That's kinda normal for me.

    Good argument for using digital I reckon. Delete all the crap on the spot and you've only used one
    shot's worth of memory.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
  12. stemc © wrote:

    > Yes, I really do need to get up earlier! My typical weekend is to get up at 11am or later, then
    > get out at about 2pm. Obviously, in the summer months, this makes for crap photography due to the
    > angle of the sun etc,

    The best light for landscapes is almost invariably early morning, from 1 hour before sunrise to 2
    hours after. Evening light can be good too but it's more of a lottery. On sunny days the light is
    usually extremely clear in the morning, often with zero clouds. Clouds and haze tend to build up
    throughout the day though, especially in the afternoon, and can ruin the sunset, or sometimes make
    it very interesting.

    Sunset is when you *may* get spectacular clouds, but it's a lottery, the clouds can easily kill the
    sunset stone dead, it mainly depends on whether there are clear skies to the west below the horizon
    (i.e. high pressure in the Atlantic). On the other hand, sunrises tend to be mostly clear and
    cloudless, but often with fog inversions and frost.

    You can't say you're serious about landscapes until you've been out shooting at 4am on a summer's
    morning! ;-) Brilliant stuff, you really must try it, best time of the day to be out there, before
    all the swarming hordes wake up.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
  13. Ac

    Ac Guest

    It was a lovely sunrise yesterday morning over the mountain opposite (you know the one Paul!) It
    went from deep purple at 6.40 to deep red about 10 mins later, followed by an orange glow shortly
    after - it was then I realised I was late for work! Wifey even got her little 35mm out but you won't
    get me posting it on here with all you pros about!

    Time for work.

    Keep up the good Walk.
     
  14. The Reid

    The Reid Guest

    Following up to stemc ©

    >I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    >
    >They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    >impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)

    nice picture. (They probably don't pay too much attention to every entry). Have a look at the
    winning entry and do an honest comparison. The winner may have that extra something that you only
    get once in a while.
    --
    Mike Reid "Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso Walking, Wasdale, Thames path, London
    etc "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site Spain, food and walking "http://www.fell-
    walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  15. The Reid

    The Reid Guest

    Following up to stemc ©

    >Yes, I really do need to get up earlier! My typical weekend is to get up at 11am or later, then get
    >out at about 2pm.

    for landscape be out at dawn and dusk, sleep in the afternoon :)
    --
    Mike Reid "Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso Walking, Wasdale, Thames path, London
    etc "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site Spain, food and walking "http://www.fell-
    walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  16. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > stemc © wrote:
    >
    > > Yes, I really do need to get up earlier! My typical weekend is to get up at 11am or later, then
    > > get out at about 2pm. Obviously, in the summer months, this makes for crap photography due to
    > > the angle of the sun etc,
    >
    > The best light for landscapes is almost invariably early morning, from 1 hour before sunrise to 2
    > hours after. Evening light can be good too but it's more of a lottery. On sunny days the light is
    > usually extremely clear in the morning, often with zero clouds. Clouds and haze tend to build up
    > throughout the day though, especially in the afternoon, and can ruin the sunset, or sometimes make
    > it very interesting.

    1 hour *before* sunrise? Won't it just be dark for most of that?

    > Sunset is when you *may* get spectacular clouds, but it's a lottery, the clouds can easily kill
    > the sunset stone dead, it mainly depends on whether there are clear skies to the west below the
    > horizon (i.e. high pressure in the Atlantic). On the other hand, sunrises tend to be mostly clear
    > and cloudless, but often with fog inversions and frost.

    Michael Fish eat your heart out! ;-)

    > You can't say you're serious about landscapes until you've been out shooting at 4am on a summer's
    > morning! ;-) Brilliant stuff, you really must try it, best time of the day to be out there, before
    > all the swarming hordes wake up.

    Of course not! :) Though don't forget when I woke up early whilst on holiday for those sunrise
    shot! I earned by stripes that day! ;-)

    > Paul

    Ste
     
  17. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "The Reid" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Following up to stemc ©
    >
    > >Yes, I really do need to get up earlier! My typical weekend is to get up
    at
    > >11am or later, then get out at about 2pm.
    >
    > for landscape be out at dawn and dusk, sleep in the afternoon :)
    > --
    > Mike Reid

    I know, I must change my ways. :)

    Ste
     
  18. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "The Reid" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Following up to stemc ©
    >
    > >I sent in this photo: http://www.sm9.co.uk/test/dragonflies.jpg
    > >
    > >They sent me a card back that had the following check box ticked: "Technically good, but lacks
    > >impact." Oh well, in other words, it means 'boring shot Ste!' :)
    >
    > nice picture. (They probably don't pay too much attention to every entry). Have a look at the
    > winning entry and do an honest comparison. The winner may have that extra something that you only
    > get once in a while.
    > --
    > Mike Reid

    Thanks Mike, and I'm looking forward to seeing the winning entries in next month's issue. Hopefully,
    I can learn from this, and try to get a feel for how the judges minds are working and what they are
    looking for.

    Ste
     
  19. Stemc ©

    Stemc © Guest

    "Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Chris Street wrote:
    >
    > > As others said it needs more work on composition and framing. Taking semi macro photos of
    > > insects is damn tricky and needs a lot of practice so don't feel too bad about it.
    >
    > I doubt if I could take a shot that good.

    I'm sure you could if you had any interest in trying.

    > What I like about landscapes is that they stay still while you take the picture, so you can
    > usually spend as long as you like composing it. Of course the light can sometimes change very
    > fast, but at least the scenery doesn't move.

    But my problem with landscapes is that I then don't have any excuses for bad photos! ;-)

    <snip>

    > Paul

    Ste
     
  20. stemc © wrote:

    > 1 hour *before* sunrise? Won't it just be dark for most of that?

    DEEP PURPLE!!! And I don't mean the band!

    The colour of the night sky up the mountains just as twilight begins has to be seen to be believed.
    Don't forget that I took that Worms Head shot exactly 1 hour *after* sunset.

    What this means of course is that it's no good getting up 1 hour before sunrise, or even going out 1
    hour before sunrise, or even getting out of the car 1 hour before sunrise. You have to start
    *shooting* 1 hour before sunrise, that means you have to allow for waking up, packing up, driving to
    the area *and* walking to the viewpoint in the dark in order to arrive there at 1 hour before
    sunrise. So in summer, don't even bother going to bed the night before. ;-)

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
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