OT: Saturday Night at the OLD Movies

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Jmcquown, Feb 28, 2004.

  1. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    What shall it be? A scary film? Hitchcock... The Birds? Psycho? A comedy? Romance?

    Whatever it is, it shall be accompanied by popped corn (and if you choose to throw sugar in there
    and make kettle corn, okay). I'm thinking... hmmmm.

    What's your choice for Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your movie night?

    Jill
     
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  2. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > What shall it be? A scary film? Hitchcock... The Birds? Psycho? A comedy? Romance?
    >
    > Whatever it is, it shall be accompanied by popped corn (and if you choose to throw sugar in there
    > and make kettle corn, okay). I'm thinking... hmmmm.
    >
    > What's your choice for Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your
    > movie night?
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >
    >

    Tonight it will be "The Italian Job" with Micheal Caine circa 1970's. Just love watching those
    Mini's perform. Pretzels with some of my Chocolate Pate as Pretzel dip.

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
  3. T E

    T E Guest

    [email protected] (jmcquown) wrote: What shall it be? A scary film? Hitchcock... The Birds?
    Psycho? A comedy? Romance? Whatever it is, it shall be accompanied by popped corn (and if you choose
    to throw sugar in there and make kettle corn, okay). I'm thinking... hmmmm. What's your choice for
    Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your movie night? Jill
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --------------------------
    While reading your post my mind went back few years ago-actually over 30 years- when you never would
    have caught me being home on saturday nites. Weekends were for partying with friends, going to rock
    concerts, generally having a good time. I had a tv at home but seldom was it even turned on. Now
    look at us! lol
     
  4. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What's your choice for Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your
    > movie night?

    One of our local pbs stations reserves Sat night for a couple old movie classics. Tonight it's The
    Stranger w/ Orsen Welles and the original Gaslight ('40), almost lost due to MGM's attempts to
    destroy all copies so as not to compete with the Bergman/Boyer version ('44). I'm looking forward to
    it as I've never seen this original version before.

    The menu will be a rather nondescript frozen pizza. But, I'm only eating that to give my tummy
    something to hold on to while I indulge in some award winning India Pale Ales and a couple of
    exquisite Belgian ales.

    I oughta be toast by the end of the second flick! :)

    nb
     
  5. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    jmcquown wrote:
    > What shall it be? A scary film? Hitchcock... The Birds? Psycho? A comedy? Romance?

    The Lion King Pirates of the Caribbean

    > What's your choice for Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your
    > movie night?

    Whiskey Rum Beef Jerky

    Anyway, I wish I had some OLD flicks, but the movers "lost" the box of
    DVDs. So I am rebuilding my collection. Ideally I would watch Spartacus and drink a 12 pack of beer.
    Maybe the treasure of the sierra madre, or maybe blazing saddles. Spartacus holds a dear place
    in my heart though. I think that is easily one of the best movies, ever.

    --
    John Gaughan http://www.johngaughan.net/ [email protected]
     
  6. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-02-29, John Gaughan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Spartacus holds a dear place in my heart though. I think that is easily one of the best
    > movies, ever.

    I agree. It was the best of the gladiator genre. Having such fond memories of Sparticus, I was
    completely dumbfounded by the success of Gladiator, a poor, blatantly unoriginal copy of the 5 star
    Kirk vehicle. When it won all those Acadamy awards I was totally disgusted. The Academy wouldn't
    know talent if it ran over them in a truck. Although I think Russel Crowe is perfect in Captain and
    Commander, his part in Gladiator could have been played by one of those full-size cardboard cutouts
    tourists stand next to for photos. Speaking of Sparticus, it's been a long, long while since I've
    seen The Vikings, an equally rousing macho tale with the same two male leads ...and a better score.

    nb
     
  7. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 21:44:18 -0600, John Gaughan

    > Spartacus holds a dear place in my heart though. I think that is easily one of the best
    > movies, ever.

    Did you like Zulu?

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  8. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    T E wrote:
    > [email protected] (jmcquown) wrote: What shall it be? A scary film? Hitchcock... The Birds?
    > Psycho? A comedy? Romance? Whatever it is, it shall be accompanied by popped corn (and if you
    > choose to throw sugar in there and make kettle corn, okay). I'm thinking... hmmmm. What's your
    > choice for Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your movie night? Jill
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------------------------------------
    > While reading your post my mind went back few years ago-actually over 30 years- when you never
    > would have caught me being home on saturday nites. Weekends were for partying with friends, going
    > to rock concerts, generally having a good time. I had a tv at home but seldom was it even turned
    > on. Now look at us! lol

    Yeah, I had my moments back then, too :) Can't stay a teen forever!

    Jill
     
  9. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> What's your choice for Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your
    >> movie night?
    >
    > One of our local pbs stations reserves Sat night for a couple old movie classics. Tonight it's The
    > Stranger w/ Orsen Welles and the original Gaslight ('40), almost lost due to MGM's attempts to
    > destroy all copies so as not to compete with the Bergman/Boyer version ('44). I'm looking forward
    > to it as I've never seen this original version before.

    I had no idea there was a version before Bergman/Boyer!

    > The menu will be a rather nondescript frozen pizza. But, I'm only eating that to give my tummy
    > something to hold on to while I indulge in some award winning India Pale Ales and a couple of
    > exquisite Belgian ales.
    >
    > I oughta be toast by the end of the second flick! :)
    >
    >
    > nb
     
  10. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I had no idea there was a version before Bergman/Boyer!

    Me neither. I just finished watching it and was quite impressed. The two main characters were very
    good. As a guy, I have to profess a preference for Bergmam, if only because she's one of my favorite
    actresses (whatta babe!). But, the org version was very good, deserving of kudos cuz of very intense
    character portrayal. I'm glad I had a chance to see it and highly recommend it to any true
    cinemaphile.

    nb
     
  11. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I had no idea there was a version before Bergman/Boyer!
    >
    > Me neither. I just finished watching it and was quite impressed. The two main characters were very
    > good. As a guy, I have to profess a preference for Bergmam, if only because she's one of my
    > favorite actresses (whatta babe!). But, the org version was very good, deserving of kudos cuz of
    > very intense character portrayal. I'm glad I had a chance to see it and highly recommend it to any
    > true cinemaphile.
    >
    > nb

    Gonna tell me who the actors were in the 'original' version? Anyone we would know?!

    Jill
     
  12. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Gonna tell me who the actors were in the 'original' version? Anyone we would know?!

    Probably not. The org was filmed w/ obscure Brit actors. Here's the review:

    http://tvguide.com/Movies/database/showmovie.asp?MI=28037

    The Cinebooks movie database from tvguide.com is the best movie resource on the internet. You have
    to put up with some b.s. like cookies, but it has no equal for the serious movie junkie. :)

    nb
     
  13. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Gonna tell me who the actors were in the 'original' version? Anyone we would know?!
    >
    > Probably not. The org was filmed w/ obscure Brit actors. Here's the review:
    >
    > http://tvguide.com/Movies/database/showmovie.asp?MI=28037
    >
    > The Cinebooks movie database from tvguide.com is the best movie resource on the internet. You have
    > to put up with some b.s. like cookies, but it has no equal for the serious movie junkie. :)
    >
    > nb

    Funny, all I see is the 1944 Cukor film. And it says Parental Rating: Cautionary, some scenes
    objectionable. What on earth was objectionable?! Oh well, I'll watch for it. Perhaps PBS will show
    the 'original' one of these days.

    OB Food: did you at least pop some corn?

    Jill
     
  14. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    RMiller wrote:
    >> Yeah, I had my moments back then, too :) Can't stay a teen forever!
    >>
    >
    > You are SOOOO right, Thank God ! I think being a teenager is horrible, thank God I got over it.
    >
    > Rosie

    ROFL I'm quite enjoying middle age, thank you! Wouldn't go back *there* for anything!

    Jill
     
  15. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Funny, all I see is the 1944 Cukor film. And it says Parental Rating:

    Oops! Gave you the wrong URL. Here's the original:

    http://tvguide.com/Movies/database/showmovie.asp?MI=28036

    Here's the search page:

    http://tvguide.com/movies/database/

    The search function is real finicky. Your best bet is to use a single word from the title, the more
    obscure, the better. The real advantage to this database is you can click on any of the cast names
    and it will bring up all the other movies they've done. This is real handy when you just can't
    remember the name of that movie whatchimacallit was in.

    > OB Food: did you at least pop some corn?

    No, but the pizza wasn't half bad. It was a California Pizza Kitchens pizza, BBQ chicken. Do they
    sell this line out there?

    nb
     
  16. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Funny, all I see is the 1944 Cukor film. And it says Parental Rating:
    >
    > Oops! Gave you the wrong URL. Here's the original:
    >
    > http://tvguide.com/Movies/database/showmovie.asp?MI=28036
    >
    > Here's the search page:
    >
    > http://tvguide.com/movies/database/
    >
    > The search function is real finicky. Your best bet is to use a single word from the title, the
    > more obscure, the better. The real advantage to this database is you can click on any of the cast
    > names and it will bring up all the other movies they've done. This is real handy when you just
    > can't remember the name of that movie whatchimacallit was in.
    >
    >> OB Food: did you at least pop some corn?
    >
    > No, but the pizza wasn't half bad. It was a California Pizza Kitchens pizza, BBQ chicken. Do they
    > sell this line out there?
    >
    > nb

    LOL no, they don't sell CA Pizza Kitchen out here but they used to be a client of ours.

    Thank you, I will have to search for the original version, perhaps on Amazon. I did (and do) adore
    the costumes worn by "hottie" (laugh) Bergman. Never thought Joseph Cotton quite fit into the part
    of the 'hero' in Cukor's version. But I can quote Bergman with the same accent, "Knife? What knife?
    Are you mad, my husband?" ROFL

    Jill

    Jill
     
  17. Jill wrote:

    > notbob wrote:
    > > On 2004-02-29, jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> What's your choice for Sat. Night watching OLD flicks? And what goodies accompany your movie
    > >> night?
    > >
    > > One of our local pbs stations reserves Sat night for a couple old movie classics. Tonight it's
    > > The Stranger w/ Orsen Welles and the original Gaslight ('40), almost lost due to MGM's attempts
    > > to destroy all copies so as not to compete with the Bergman/Boyer version ('44). I'm looking
    > > forward to it as I've never seen this original version before.
    >
    > I had no idea there was a version before Bergman/Boyer!
    >

    Both Gaslights have just been released on a single DVD:

    http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s1101gas.html

    "Patrick Hamilton's play Angel Street was given two very good filmic translations in the 1940s. The
    most famous is obviously the Ingrid Bergman remake with its top star cast and ritzy direction from
    George Cukor. But the original English film has a lot going for it as well - and is probably the
    better all-round thriller.

    This DVD treats this unsung first version as an added extra, as it did with the earlier Mystery of
    the Wax Museum on the House of Wax disc last year. Add in last month's double bill of two versions
    of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Warners is presenting us with some fascinating opportunities to
    compare Hollywood remakes.

    1940: The Thorold Dickinson original version of Gaslight is a period melodrama with an interesting
    take on psychological disturbances made before the '40s Freudian fad hit Hollywood. Aristocratic
    Paul Mallen (Anton Walbrook) browbeats and tricks his wife until she believes she must be going
    insane, a process that's more than credible considering the view of marriage in Victorian times.
    Bella Mallen (Diana Wynyard) has brought the money into the marriage but is completely at the mercy
    of male authority. Paul imposes humiliating punishments as if she had no rights whatsoever, imposing
    his views onto every situation and making her into a virtual prisoner. In short, the Victorian
    husband has the right to decide what's real and what's not, giving him the ability to inflict
    extreme mental abuse.

    This English version of Gaslight must have received positive notices as one of the heirs to the
    Alfred Hitchcock throne of thrillerdom. Hitchcock had recently been enticed to America by David O'
    Selznick and was laboring at making a different kind of Gothic romance/ghost story, Rebecca. In his
    absence Carol Reed thrilled the Brits with his exciting Night Train to Munich, which had a strong
    resemblance to The 39 Steps and The Lady Vanishes. This Gaslight begins with an old lady strangled
    in brutal close-up, and parallels the story inside the Mallen household with the improvised
    investigation of a retired detective, now a stablemaster (Frank Pettingell). Poor Mrs. Mallen goes
    nuts, or at least thinks she is, while haunted by eerie phenomena like strange noises and the
    dimming of the gaslight in her bedroom. She's a damsel in distress trapped in her own household, a
    situation any wife can identify with. Dickinson's Gaslight is a good example of an always-popular
    subgenre of thriller that Hitchcock himself returned to on occasion, as in Under Capricorn, also
    with Bergman.

    This early version probably hews close to the original play, taking place almost exclusively around
    a London square of upper-class homes. There's the fancy piano recital scene interrupted by Bella's
    breakdown when she's accused of stealing her husband's watch. A trip to a music hall with a lively
    Can-Can dance is nice break from the Gothic claustrophobia.

    Diana Wynyard (Rasputin and the Empress, Cavalcade)'s Bella just wants to be a happy housewife and
    is shown being kind to some neighborhood kids (who are barred from the park; why not from this tony
    borough altogether?). She's the pawn in a sick game that causes her enough believable anxiety to
    provoke a real nervous breakdown, and she handles it very well. Bella is written straight to the one
    issue - male dominance - and is never overplayed.

    Anton Walbrook (The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The Red Shoes) is superb as the manipulative
    psychopath Paul Mallen. He's more a straight Dr. Crippen-Bluebeard type than a romantic ideal,
    carefully working out an unlikely but somehow credible scheme. His corruption is complete and we're
    not asked to have much sympathy for him. Suave and sinister, Walbrook's playing is much smoother
    than Charles Boyer's in the remake.

    Mallen tries to carry on an affair with his own parlor maid Nancy (Cathleen Cordell, much later of
    M*A*S*H and The Return of the Living Dead), a subplot that shows how easy it is for a Victorian
    householder to have his cake and eat it too, by making sure the servants don't talk to his wife.
    Nancy is proud of her many gentleman friends and all too eager to 'meet' with her employer, and
    again there's no softening of the implications. We see three abuses of male authority here: A wife
    driven mad, adulterous exploitation, and outright murder for profit.

    Hitchcock watched his competitors like a hawk and may have been influenced by Dickinson's film.
    (Spoiler) When Bella steps out onto her balcony at the end, 'cured' but disillusioned, she's an
    isolated soul facing an uncertain future. Visually, the moment is very similar to the end of
    Vertigo, a tale where romance is used to manipulate a man into a nervous breakdown.

    [...]

    Warners' Gaslight DVD double bill looks very good indeed. Both shows are in excellent shape, with a
    few hairline scratches here and there. Grain is minimized in both. The English version appears to be
    an American source with a Leo logo spliced on.

    The movies occupy opposite sides of a flipper disc. The 1940 version is over half an hour shorter
    and for that reason is given the extras. The trailer for the 1944 remake is welcome, and a short
    docu gives us some remembrances by Angela Lansbury. She has a fine time telling us about her big
    break, the generosity of her co-stars and her own lack of experience. The featurette doesn't mention
    anything about the original version, but is satisfying just the same."

    </
     
  18. MareCat

    MareCat Guest

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 20:33:17 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >No, but the pizza wasn't half bad. It was a California Pizza Kitchens pizza, BBQ chicken.

    I like the CPK Thai Chicken pizzas.
     
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