OT: Strida folding bike didn't work

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Alan Weiss, Jan 28, 2003.

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  1. Alan Weiss

    Alan Weiss Guest

    Hi, folks, I know this is off topic, but I recently needed a folding bike to do some "intermodal"
    travel (train & bike). I thought that a recumbent folder such as a SatRDay would not fold small
    enough, and I didn't really want to buy such an expensive bike for short trips. So I ordered a
    Strida http://www.strida.com This isn't such a cheap bike, but it costs less than a recumbent
    folder. It's pretty, and can be rolled while folded (saving my ever-weakening back). So I thought
    I'd give it a try.

    Well, they are no longer sold by a US distributor, you order through a UK web site, and it's mailed
    out from a guy in the US. But he doesn't help if there are problems. Which there were. My Strida
    came without assembly instructions (but I could figure it out), without the fenders I paid for, and
    with a bent piece of metal as part of the hub which looked in their pictures as if it should be
    straight. But all of that was nothing compared to the real problem: every time I tried riding
    uphill, the belt fell off! (The Strida uses a belt instead of a chain.) I simply could not get any
    satisfaction by sending emails. No fenders, no instructions, no clue as to how to make the bike work
    for me. After a few frustrating weeks I sent it back. Fortunately, they did refund all the charges
    except shipping both ways.

    As far as riding the bike on the level, it wasn't so good. The bike handles poorly. I felt very
    unsafe going downhill at anything above 12 mph or so. Also, it did not make a compact package when
    folded. On the plus side, it is indeed a very clean machine, and folds and unfolds quickly.

    I am much happier with my new Dahon Piccolo. http://www.dahon.com/piccolo-us.htm The Piccolo handles
    well, folds reasonably compactly and quickly, and has a backpack for use on trips where you don't
    want the bike exposed. I've used it quite a bit this past week, and it only gets better as I get
    used to it. But it sure isn't as comfortable as any recumbent!

    Alan Weiss NJ Gold Rush, E2 tandem, and Leitra rider
     
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  2. The Strida has no Fork Flop. It has enough trail, but the front wheel isn't loaded enough to make
    the bike feel like a bike. I have one in my garage that handles pretty well.

    Strida didn't pay the consulting fee.
    --
    Bill "Pop Pop" Patterson Retired and riding my Linear, my front drive low racer and our M5 tandem.
     
  3. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    The Strida looks like a design concept that maybe shouldn't have gone any further than concept. IMHO
    _Real_ folding bikes include the Brompton, Birdy and Dahon.

    John Riley
     
  4. Used to have a Strida (before it got stolen); quick fold,light weight, but not much good otherwise.
    Not really suitable for anybody over
    1.70m, belt drive, and worst of all : the freewheel's in the bottom bracket! Had a few spectacular
    (if harmless) crashes with it: my pant legs would get caught in the belt,promptly blocking the
    rear wheel, and the whole bike would just fall apart! It's easy enough to reassemble the lot, and
    the bike is slow enough that a fall won't hurt you, but it still did put me off a bit... I'm
    happily Bromptonized now, and for really short hops I've got a folding kickscooter. BTW: there's
    one German fellow who keeps a kickscooter in the tailbox of his 'bent; makes sense considering the
    state of German innercity cycle paths....

    Mark van Gorkom.
     
  5. Paul Minnis

    Paul Minnis Guest

    Go retro. As a change from my two recumbents, I ride a 1975 Raleigh Twenty folder. It's
    great fun. paul

    [email protected] (Mark van Gorkom) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Used to have a Strida (before it got stolen); quick fold,light weight, but not much good
    > otherwise. Not really suitable for anybody over
    > 1.70m, belt drive, and worst of all : the freewheel's in the bottom bracket! Had a few spectacular
    > (if harmless) crashes with it: my pant legs would get caught in the belt,promptly blocking the
    > rear wheel, and the whole bike would just fall apart! It's easy enough to reassemble the lot,
    > and the bike is slow enough that a fall won't hurt you, but it still did put me off a bit... I'm
    > happily Bromptonized now, and for really short hops I've got a folding kickscooter. BTW: there's
    > one German fellow who keeps a kickscooter in the tailbox of his 'bent; makes sense considering
    > the state of German innercity cycle paths....
    >
    > Mark van Gorkom.
     
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