OT: The reason the Nigerians keep going



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T

Tony Raven

Guest
I often wonder who falls for the Nigerian money scams but you can fool some of
the people all of the time and those are the ones they're after:

Tony

http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/africa/02/05/nigeria.419.trial.ap/index.html

Five Nigerians charged in $242 million '419' fraud trial Friday, February 6, 2004 Posted: 4:54 PM
EST (2154 GMT)

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) -- Nigerian prosecutors leveled 86 counts of fraud and conspiracy against five
people Thursday for allegedly swindling a Brazilian bank of $242 million, in the biggest crackdown
yet on the West African nation's advance-fee fraud or "419" scams. The five are accused of luring an
employee of Sao Paulo's Banco Noroeste into siphoning off the funds from his employer, persuading
him he could land a share in a lucrative Nigerian construction contract if he just paid enough
handling fees up front. The five appeared in court in Nigeria's capital, Abuja, in handcuffs to hear
the charges Thursday. All the suspects, including housewife Amaka Anajemba, lawyer Obum Osakwe, and
businessman Emmanuel Nwude -- described by prosecutors as "a major shareholder" in a leading
Nigerian bank -- pleaded innocent. Penalties for each of the counts range between seven and 10
years. Four Nigerian companies -- Ocean Marketing, Fynbaz, Emrus, and the African Shelter Bureau --
also accused of involvement in the alleged crime were not represented in court. Presiding Judge
Lawal Gumi entered innocent pleas on behalf of the companies and postponed proceedings until
Wednesday, when he will consider requests for bond. There was mild drama in court when suspect
Nzeribe Okoli, while making his plea, declared he would make "shocking revelations" during the
trial. "There are so many hidden things which Nigerians should know," Okoli said before he was
interrupted by the judge, who told him to restrict his answers to the questions he was asked.
Nigeria's anti-fraud body, the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, alleges in court papers the
suspects told the Brazilian bank worker he would receive $13.4 million from an $187 million Nigerian
airport contract -- if he invested money up front. The bank worker allegedly dug illegally into his
bank's funds, transferring the $242 million -- in segments as high as $4.75 million at a time -- to
accounts around the world designated by the suspects, the papers showed. Nigeria has gained global
notoriety as a base for such advance-fee fraud, known as '419' schemes after the section of the
country's criminal code that prohibits fraud. In most of the cases, scam artists proposition victims
with e-mails claiming to have millions of dollars from inflated contracts, the estates of dead
dictators, or other illicit proceeds, and seeking help to transfer the money abroad. The victims are
then made to pay never-ending "service fees" and other charges -- the object of the scams. Nuhu
Ribadu, who heads the commission set up by President Olusegun Obasanjo's government in December 2002
to combat sophisticated fraud and money-laundering rings, told a news conference on Wednesday he
intended to use this case to prove that "no one is above the law." The case was also the subject of
criminal investigations in Switzerland, Britain, the United States and Brazil, Ribadu said.
 
G

Graham

Guest
"Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I often wonder who falls for the Nigerian money scams but you can fool
some of
> the people all of the time and those are the ones they're after:
>
> Tony
>
> http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/africa/02/05/nigeria.419.trial.ap/index.html
>
> Five Nigerians charged in $242 million '419' fraud trial Friday, February 6, 2004 Posted: 4:54 PM
> EST (2154 GMT)
>
> ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) -- Nigerian prosecutors leveled 86 counts of fraud and conspiracy against five
> people Thursday for allegedly swindling a
Brazilian
> bank of $242 million, in the biggest crackdown yet on the West African nation's advance-fee fraud
> or "419" scams. The five are accused of luring an employee of Sao Paulo's Banco Noroeste
into
> siphoning off the funds from his employer, persuading him he could land a share in a lucrative
> Nigerian construction contract if he just paid enough handling fees up front. The five appeared in
> court in Nigeria's capital, Abuja, in handcuffs to
hear
> the charges Thursday. All the suspects, including housewife Amaka
Anajemba,
> lawyer Obum Osakwe, and businessman Emmanuel Nwude -- described by
prosecutors
> as "a major shareholder" in a leading Nigerian bank -- pleaded innocent. Penalties for each of the
> counts range between seven and 10 years. Four Nigerian companies -- Ocean Marketing, Fynbaz,
> Emrus, and the African Shelter Bureau -- also accused of involvement in the alleged crime were
not
> represented in court. Presiding Judge Lawal Gumi entered innocent pleas on behalf of the
companies
> and postponed proceedings until Wednesday, when he will consider requests
for
> bond. There was mild drama in court when suspect Nzeribe Okoli, while making his plea, declared he
> would make "shocking revelations" during the trial. "There are so many hidden things which
> Nigerians should know," Okoli said before he was interrupted by the judge, who told him to
> restrict his
answers
> to the questions he was asked. Nigeria's anti-fraud body, the Economic and Financial Crimes
> Commission, alleges in court papers the suspects told the Brazilian bank worker he
would
> receive $13.4 million from an $187 million Nigerian airport contract -- if
he
> invested money up front. The bank worker allegedly dug illegally into his bank's funds,
transferring
> the $242 million -- in segments as high as $4.75 million at a time -- to accounts around the world
> designated by the suspects, the papers showed. Nigeria has gained global notoriety as a base for
> such advance-fee fraud, known as '419' schemes after the section of the country's criminal code
that
> prohibits fraud. In most of the cases, scam artists proposition victims with e-mails
claiming
> to have millions of dollars from inflated contracts, the estates of dead dictators, or other
> illicit proceeds, and seeking help to transfer the
money
> abroad. The victims are then made to pay never-ending "service fees" and other charges -- the
> object of the scams. Nuhu Ribadu, who heads the commission set up by President Olusegun
Obasanjo's
> government in December 2002 to combat sophisticated fraud and
money-laundering
> rings, told a news conference on Wednesday he intended to use this case to prove that "no one is
> above the law." The case was also the subject of criminal investigations in Switzerland, Britain,
> the United States and Brazil, Ribadu said.
>
>
Yet another good reason for not letting them in this country. Though we have too many as it is !

Graham
 
N

Nobody760

Guest
Don't be so biased. My friends in Nigeria are going to put £3,000,000 into my bank soon. They are
not so clever cos I only sent them £3,000 for administration. So you work it out £3,000,000 - £3,000
= £2,997,000 profit! They are not so clever now are they!
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"nobody760" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Don't be so biased. My friends in Nigeria are going to put £3,000,000 into my bank soon. They are
> not so clever cos I only sent them £3,000 for administration. So you work it out £3,000,000 -
> £3,000 = £2,997,000
profit!
> They are not so clever now are they!

Any chance you'll let me in on it, I've got £3000 kicking around <1>. I had earmarked it for re-
surfacing my drive but got fed up waiting for the travellers to come round with a bit of black stuff
that's been left over from a local road repair.
<1> I saved the money to have double glazing fitted but am waiting for a salesman to call as they
give a special discount if I invite them in and sign a contract there and then but now know I
don't need to use my money at all as the window company will kindly arrange finance at 29.9%
APR if I buy their insurance because I have been specially selected in my neighbourhood. Must
dash, I have to claim another free prize from a draw I don't recall entering, but hey, it's
only going to cost a fiver to claim it and I'm keeping quiet about not entering, after all it's
their mistake!
--
Regards, Pete
 
S

Simonb

Guest
Graham wrote:

> Yet another good reason for not letting them in this country. Though we have too many as
> it is !

Whoever you are, Graham, would you please stop using this newsgroup as a platform for your racist
views. No-one's interested them.

Thanks,

Simon
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 16:52:55 +0000 (UTC), "Peter B"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Any chance you'll let me in on it, I've got £3000 kicking around <1>. I had earmarked it for re-
>surfacing my drive but got fed up waiting for the travellers to come round with a bit of black
>stuff that's been left over from a local road repair.

I'm afraid I don't have £3,000 kicking around any more since Guy sold me Tower Bridge.

--
Dave...

Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 17:02:47 -0000, "Simonb"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Whoever you are, Graham, would you please stop using this newsgroup as a platform for your racist
>views. No-one's interested them.

Trolls - feed them not.

--
Dave...

Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
 
R

Richard Bates

Guest
On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 16:52:55 +0000 (UTC), in
<[email protected]>, "Peter B"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>"nobody760" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]...
>> Don't be so biased. My friends in Nigeria are going to put £3,000,000 into my bank soon. They are
>> not so clever cos I only sent them £3,000 for administration. So you work it out £3,000,000 -
>> £3,000 = £2,997,000
>profit!
>> They are not so clever now are they!
>
>Any chance you'll let me in on it, I've got £3000 kicking around <1>. I had earmarked it for re-
>surfacing my drive but got fed up waiting for the travellers to come round with a bit of black
>stuff that's been left over from a local road repair.

[snip]

I've got a dynamo powered electric bicycle in my garage if you want to buy it ...
--
I remember when the internet was only in black & white. It only had a few pages but at least they
all worked. Email: Put only the word "richard" before the @ sign.
 
J

James Hodson

Guest
On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 17:02:47 -0000, "Simonb"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Whoever you are, Graham, would you please stop using this newsgroup as a platform for your racist
>views. No-one's interested them.
>

Hi Simon

Just please tell me exactly what is wrong with Graham stating that he would rather not have everyone
who feels like it possobly illegally entering the UK, especially those who have the intention of
permantly staying here? As far as I understand it, there are laws governing illegal entrants.

Simon, please tell me why Graham's views are racialist.

James
 
S

Simonb

Guest
James Hodson wrote:
> Just please tell me exactly what is wrong with Graham stating that he would rather not have
> everyone who feels like it possobly illegally entering the UK, especially those who have the
> intention of permantly staying here? As far as I understand it, there are laws governing illegal
> entrants.
>

All Nigerian immigrants are illegal and undesirable? I don't think so.

Judging by Graham's recent posts, his views are abhorrent, indefensible, and completely irrelevant.
This thread has nothing to do with immigration; it's a light-hearted take on the idiots who fall for
the Nigerian scam. And he was trying to swing it round to his agenda.

He's simply racist.

Simon
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 21:40:14 +0000, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 20:32:43 +0000, Dave Kahn <[email protected]> wrote in message
><[email protected]>:
>
>>I'm afraid I don't have £3,000 kicking around any more since Guy sold me Tower Bridge.
>
>Damn. I was hoping you would buy the set.

I want to see how I get on with this one first. What do you take me for? A mug?

--
Dave...

Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
 
G

Graeme

Guest
James Hodson <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> please tell me why Graham's views are racialist.
>

The original post did not mention immigrants, illegal or otherwise. All it mentioned was Nigerians.
It is obvious from this that Graham meant that there are too many Nigerians (or more likely, black
Africans in general) in this country. What is difficult in spotting the racist views in that?

Or perhaps Graham has swallowed the UK press line in that every immigrant is illegal and every
asylum seeker is "bogus". Maybe he can't read such an article without "illegal" and "bogus"
automatically coming to mind. Perhaps that's what's wrong with all the small minded, bigoted
f*ckwits who spout such views or try to support them; they can't separate fact from media
driven fiction?

Here's some news for you, a vast section of the population of the UK has "foreign" blood running
through their veins to some extent, that's part of being a major seafaring nation with strong
worldwide trade routes from way back.

Graeme
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
"James Hodson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> Just please tell me exactly what is wrong with Graham stating that he would rather not have
> everyone who feels like it possobly illegally entering the UK, especially those who have the
> intention of permantly staying here?

That wasn't what he said.

And when did refugees become asylum seekers?

--
Guy
===

WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
Graeme <[email protected]> writes:

> Here's some news for you, a vast section of the population of the UK has "foreign" blood running
> through their veins to some extent, that's part of being a major seafaring nation with strong
> worldwide trade routes from way back.

Make that 100%. 8000 years ago, there was nobody here at all. We're all descended from immigrants,
and almost all of those immigrants were unwelcome at the time they arrived.

Simon, whose ancesters got here about 1600 years ago.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; Friends don't send friends HTML formatted emails.
 
C

Colin Blackburn

Guest
On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 23:21:04 +0000, James Hodson
<[email protected]> wrote:

> Hi Simon
>
> Just please tell me exactly what is wrong with Graham stating that he would rather not have
> everyone who feels like it possobly illegally entering the UK, especially those who have the
> intention of permantly staying here? As far as I understand it, there are laws governing illegal
> entrants.

Graham's views were not informed. He said: "Yet another good reason for not letting them in this
country. Though we have too many as it is !" of Nigerians.

In another thread, the spammed article signed by Hanadi, he said "Sounds like a Raghead !"

> Simon, please tell me why Graham's views are racialist.

I would bet with unfortunate confidence that Graham is racist.

Colin
--
 
B

Ben

Guest
"Richard Bates" <[email protected]> wrote in
message news:[email protected]...
> On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 16:52:55 +0000 (UTC), in <[email protected]>, "Peter B"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Any chance you'll let me in on it, I've got £3000 kicking around <1>. I had earmarked it for re-
> >surfacing my drive but got fed up waiting for
the
> >travellers to come round with a bit of black stuff that's been left over from a local road
> >repair.
>
> [snip]
>
> I've got a dynamo powered electric bicycle in my garage if you want to buy it ...

Have you got one that doesn't keep turning the pedals?

Ben
 
M

Martinm

Guest
"Peter B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> "nobody760" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Don't be so biased. My friends in Nigeria are going to put £3,000,000 into my bank soon. They
> > are not so clever cos I only sent them £3,000 for administration. So you work it out £3,000,000
> > - £3,000 = £2,997,000
> profit!
> > They are not so clever now are they!
>
> Any chance you'll let me in on it, I've got £3000 kicking around <1>. I had earmarked it for re-
> surfacing my drive but got fed up waiting for the travellers to come round with a bit of black
> stuff that's been left over from a local road repair.
> <1> I saved the money to have double glazing fitted but am waiting for a salesman to call as they
> give a special discount if I invite them in and sign a contract there and then but now know I
> don't need to use my money at all as the window company will kindly arrange finance at 29.9%
> APR if I buy their insurance because I have been specially selected in my neighbourhood. Must
> dash, I have to claim another free prize from a draw I don't recall entering, but hey, it's
> only going to cost a fiver to claim it and I'm keeping quiet about not entering, after all
> it's their mistake!

but you have to go to a prize-giving presentation and sit thru a 3 hr speil about paying £10k for a
web password first.

I have got telephone preference, brilliant, waster free evenings;-)
 
I

Ian G Batten

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Dave Kahn <[email protected]> wrote:
> I'm afraid I don't have £3,000 kicking around any more since Guy sold me Tower Bridge.

It's always claimed, isn't it, that when those Americans bought the old London Bridge to install at
Lake Havasu, they thought they were getting Tower Bridge.

ian
 
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