OT: Times When the F Bomb is Acceptable

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Terry Pulliam Burd, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. When is @#$% Acceptable?

    There are only eleven times in history where the "F" word has been
    considered acceptable for use.

    They are as follows:

    11. "What the @#$% do you mean, we are sinking?"

    -- Capt. E.J. Smith of RMS Titanic, 1912

    10. "What the @#$% was that?"

    -- Mayor Of Hiroshima, 1945

    9. "Where did all those @#$%ing Indians come from?"

    -- Custer, 1877

    8. "Any @#$%ing idiot could un! derstand that."

    -- Einstein, 1938

    7. "It does so @#$%ing look like her!"

    -- Picasso, 1926

    6. "How the @#$% did you work that out?"

    -- Pythagoras, 126 BC

    5. "You want WHAT on the @#$%ing ceiling?"

    -- Michelangelo, 1566

    4. "Where the @#$% are we?"

    -- Amelia Earhart, 1937

    3. "Scattered @#$%ing showers, my ass!"

    -- Noah, 4314 BC

    2. "Aw c'mon. Who the @#$% is going to find out?"

    -- Bill Clinton, 1998

    and a drum roll please..........!

    1. "Geez, I didn't think they'd get this @%#*^ing mad."

    -- Saddam Hussein, 2003


    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "Most vigitaryans I iver see looked enough like their food to be
    classed as cannybals."

    Finley Peter Dunne (1900)

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
    Tags:


  2. Peter A

    Peter A Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > When is @#$% Acceptable?
    >
    > There are only eleven times in history where the "F" word has been
    > considered acceptable for use.
    >
    > They are as follows:
    >
    > 11. "What the @#$% do you mean, we are sinking?"
    >
    > -- Capt. E.J. Smith of RMS Titanic, 1912
    >


    <snipped>

    Is this supposed to be funny? Geez, 5th grade humor.

    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths pages at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  3. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 01:29:29 GMT, Peter A <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> 11. "What the @#$% do you mean, we are sinking?"
    >>
    >> -- Capt. E.J. Smith of RMS Titanic, 1912


    >Is this supposed to be funny? Geez, 5th grade humor.


    "Sinking" is the operative word here. Now back to intelligent
    cooking discussion....


    What and HOW are you dealing with "rusty" head lettuce. I am so sick
    of buying lettuce and it is almost nasty. Does anyone have a
    suggestion on how to keep it more than two days?
     
  4. Squeaks wrote:

    > There are only eleven times in history where the "F" word has been
    > considered acceptable for use.
    >
    > They are as follows:


    <snip>

    Reminds me of this one: How do you get a little old lady to shout the
    F-word?

    Get ANOTHER little old lady to shout "Bingo!"

    Bob
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    Ward Abbott <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 01:29:29 GMT, Peter A <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >> 11. "What the @#$% do you mean, we are sinking?"
    > >>
    > >> -- Capt. E.J. Smith of RMS Titanic, 1912

    >
    > >Is this supposed to be funny? Geez, 5th grade humor.

    >
    > "Sinking" is the operative word here. Now back to intelligent
    > cooking discussion....
    >
    >
    > What and HOW are you dealing with "rusty" head lettuce. I am so sick
    > of buying lettuce and it is almost nasty. Does anyone have a
    > suggestion on how to keep it more than two days?
    >
    >


    Yeah.

    Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)

    Seriously.....

    Lately I've been indulging in that live boston butter lettuce! It's a
    lot more expensive but the heads are 3 times the size of the cut ones
    and I've kept them with a little water in the well around the root
    system for up to 3 weeks, but I usually eat one within 7 to 10 days.

    It's really awesome.

    As for keeping the leaf/romaine lettuce fresher longer, I just keep it
    in the bag with the front of the bag open a bit.
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  6. Ben Franklin

    Ben Franklin Guest

    Peter A wrote:
    >
    > Is this supposed to be funny? Geez, 5th grade humor.


    Yet you still read it moron - let me guess you never graduated from
    elementary school - did ya? Dumber than a box of rocks much?
     
  7. On Tue 28 Mar 2006 07:52:55p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Ward
    Abbott?

    > On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 01:29:29 GMT, Peter A <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> 11. "What the @#$% do you mean, we are sinking?"
    >>>
    >>> -- Capt. E.J. Smith of RMS Titanic, 1912

    >
    >>Is this supposed to be funny? Geez, 5th grade humor.

    >
    > "Sinking" is the operative word here. Now back to intelligent
    > cooking discussion....
    >
    >
    > What and HOW are you dealing with "rusty" head lettuce. I am so sick
    > of buying lettuce and it is almost nasty. Does anyone have a
    > suggestion on how to keep it more than two days?


    Wow, that was a LOT more interesting!

    :p

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
  8. Faux_Pseudo

    Faux_Pseudo Guest

    _.-In rec.food.cooking, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote the following -._
    > 5. "You want WHAT on the @#$%ing ceiling?"
    >
    >-- Michelangelo, 1566


    <nit-pick: Micelangelo died in 1564>

    I think that one went more like:

    "What do you mean by you don't like my @#$%ing plans for the ceiling?"

    -- Pope Julius II, 1508

    Which was followed by

    "When are you going to finish this @#$%ing ceiling?"

    -- Pope Paul III Farnese, 1511

    --
    .-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
    ' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
    ((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
    ((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson
     
  9. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Ward Abbott <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 01:29:29 GMT, Peter A <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>>11. "What the @#$% do you mean, we are sinking?"
    >>>>
    >>>>-- Capt. E.J. Smith of RMS Titanic, 1912

    >>
    >>>Is this supposed to be funny? Geez, 5th grade humor.

    >>
    >>"Sinking" is the operative word here. Now back to intelligent
    >>cooking discussion....
    >>
    >>
    >>What and HOW are you dealing with "rusty" head lettuce. I am so sick
    >>of buying lettuce and it is almost nasty. Does anyone have a
    >>suggestion on how to keep it more than two days?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Yeah.
    >
    > Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)


    Iceberg lettuce has very little nutritional value. I don't grow it and
    very seldom buy it. The darker lettuces have a higher nutritional value
    for your buck.

    >
    > Seriously.....
    >
    > Lately I've been indulging in that live boston butter lettuce! It's a
    > lot more expensive but the heads are 3 times the size of the cut ones
    > and I've kept them with a little water in the well around the root
    > system for up to 3 weeks, but I usually eat one within 7 to 10 days.


    That's the trick for any cut lettuce. You can use the same trick for
    asparagus and cut herbs.

    >
    > It's really awesome.
    >
    > As for keeping the leaf/romaine lettuce fresher longer, I just keep it
    > in the bag with the front of the bag open a bit.


    I put the romaine directly into the crisper without the bag. Mesclun
    mix when purchased is washed then put into mesh bowl in the crisper.
    The mesclun grown at home is cut just before needed and any left over is
    treated the same way.
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)

    >
    > Iceberg lettuce has very little nutritional value. I don't grow it and
    > very seldom buy it. The darker lettuces have a higher nutritional value
    > for your buck.


    VERY true!

    >
    > >
    > > Seriously.....
    > >
    > > Lately I've been indulging in that live boston butter lettuce! It's a
    > > lot more expensive but the heads are 3 times the size of the cut ones
    > > and I've kept them with a little water in the well around the root
    > > system for up to 3 weeks, but I usually eat one within 7 to 10 days.

    >
    > That's the trick for any cut lettuce. You can use the same trick for
    > asparagus and cut herbs.


    Hmmmm... I've never tried putting the base of cut lettuce in water, but
    it works for celery. :)

    >
    > >
    > > It's really awesome.
    > >
    > > As for keeping the leaf/romaine lettuce fresher longer, I just keep it
    > > in the bag with the front of the bag open a bit.

    >
    > I put the romaine directly into the crisper without the bag. Mesclun
    > mix when purchased is washed then put into mesh bowl in the crisper.
    > The mesclun grown at home is cut just before needed and any left over is
    > treated the same way.


    Sounds good!
    I don't have a "crisper" in the Hobart and my kitchen 'frige is so
    defunct, the crisper drawers are rotter drawers. <G>

    Fixin' to replace that old thing this summer hopefully!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  11. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:


    > > Yeah.
    > >
    > > Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)

    >
    > Iceberg lettuce has very little nutritional value. I don't grow it and
    > very seldom buy it. The darker lettuces have a higher nutritional value
    > for your buck.



    When you say "very little", do you mean "very little", or just a lot
    less? Iceberg has a lot of nutritional value, but not as much:

    http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/index.html

    Do you also believe the lady who posted last week that canned vegetables
    have no nutritional value at all, that they are just salt and water with
    a little fiber?

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  12. cathyxyz

    cathyxyz Guest

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > When is @#$% Acceptable?


    Oh, @#$%. What happened to that @#$%-ing global quake?

    -- Andrew B. Chump, March 29, 2006.
     
  13. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    >
    >
    >>>Yeah.
    >>>
    >>>Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)

    >>
    >>Iceberg lettuce has very little nutritional value. I don't grow it and
    >>very seldom buy it. The darker lettuces have a higher nutritional value
    >>for your buck.

    >
    >
    >
    > When you say "very little", do you mean "very little", or just a lot
    > less? Iceberg has a lot of nutritional value, but not as much:
    >
    > http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/index.html


    Per growing and dollar value, iceberg isn't worth it. Sorry
    >
    > Do you also believe the lady who posted last week that canned vegetables
    > have no nutritional value at all, that they are just salt and water with
    > a little fiber?


    No, LOL! I'm the one that does a lot of homecanning and freezing,
    remember. I can a lot of my own veggies and about the only commercially
    canned anything I buy now is tuna. Salt is an unnecessary additive when
    canning veggies, something that homecanners of veggies will likely know
    and those who buy commercially canned veggies won't. I know the way I
    do it the produce goes from the garden to be cleaned into the jars then
    canned without added preservatives, enhancers, or salt - just plain old
    good food. I don't buy commercially canned veggies for a few reasons
    and the main one being is I choose not to.
    >
     
  14. ~patches~ wrote:

    > Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>> Yeah.
    >>>>
    >>>> Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Iceberg lettuce has very little nutritional value. I don't grow it
    >>> and very seldom buy it. The darker lettuces have a higher
    >>> nutritional value for your buck.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> When you say "very little", do you mean "very little", or just a lot
    >> less? Iceberg has a lot of nutritional value, but not as much:
    >>
    >> http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/index.html

    >
    >
    > Per growing and dollar value, iceberg isn't worth it. Sorry
    >
    >>
    >> Do you also believe the lady who posted last week that canned
    >> vegetables have no nutritional value at all, that they are just salt
    >> and water with a little fiber?

    >
    >
    > No, LOL! I'm the one that does a lot of homecanning and freezing,
    > remember. I can a lot of my own veggies and about the only commercially
    > canned anything I buy now is tuna. Salt is an unnecessary additive when
    > canning veggies, something that homecanners of veggies will likely know
    > and those who buy commercially canned veggies won't. I know the way I
    > do it the produce goes from the garden to be cleaned into the jars then
    > canned without added preservatives, enhancers, or salt - just plain old
    > good food. I don't buy commercially canned veggies for a few reasons
    > and the main one being is I choose not to.
    >
    >>

    >


    I was under the impression that commercially 'canned' veggies are cooked
    to death and then have certain vitamins and minerals reintroduced into them.

    I will buy the occasional can of corn, but then only when some one
    requests i make a "tamale pie" cans of garbonzoes but again, for taste
    not nutrition, and even then i prefer to buy the dried.

    The "elderly relative" brought home a can of asparagus the other day,
    and even she, asparagus fanatic that she is, had to admit it was awful.

    I once bought a can of potatoes, just being lazy, and threw the contents
    away after heating and tasting them.

    OT anybody ever make popcorn with olive oil? that was a mistake i will
    never make again.
    ---
    JL
     
  15. Jeffs/Etc.

    Jeffs/Etc. Guest

    Faux_Pseudo wrote:
    > _.-In rec.food.cooking, Terry Pulliam Burd wrote the following -._
    > > 5. "You want WHAT on the @#$%ing ceiling?"
    > >
    > >-- Michelangelo, 1566

    >
    > <nit-pick: Micelangelo died in 1564>


    They also got the date for Pythagoras wrong.

    Jeffs
     
  16. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I was under the impression that commercially 'canned' veggies are cooked
    > to death and then have certain vitamins and minerals reintroduced into them.


    I think you're guilty of the usual mistake, taking something to its
    illogical conclusion. Fresh is better, but canned is by no means
    worthless.


    > The "elderly relative" brought home a can of asparagus the other day,
    > and even she, asparagus fanatic that she is, had to admit it was awful.



    The only thing worse than canned asparagus is no asparagus at all, ever.
    Given a choice between canned and waiting until it comes into season for
    fresh, I'll wait.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  17. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > >
    > >
    > >>>Yeah.
    > >>>
    > >>>Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)
    > >>
    > >>Iceberg lettuce has very little nutritional value. I don't grow it and
    > >>very seldom buy it. The darker lettuces have a higher nutritional value
    > >>for your buck.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > When you say "very little", do you mean "very little", or just a lot
    > > less? Iceberg has a lot of nutritional value, but not as much:
    > >
    > > http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/index.html

    >
    > Per growing and dollar value, iceberg isn't worth it. Sorry
    > >
    > > Do you also believe the lady who posted last week that canned vegetables
    > > have no nutritional value at all, that they are just salt and water with
    > > a little fiber?

    >
    > No, LOL! I'm the one that does a lot of homecanning and freezing,
    > remember.


    I have a good rememberer. I was baiting you. We both know that canned
    foods retain most of their nutrients.

    Iceberg lettuce has a lot of nutritional value, but not as much as other
    lettuce. If you don't like it, don't buy it. We buy it sometimes,
    especially if it is cheaper.

    Frankly, we spend a lot more on coffee than we do iceberg lettuce. The
    coffee has almost no nutritional value.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Iceberg lettuce has a lot of nutritional value, but not as much as other
    > lettuce. If you don't like it, don't buy it. We buy it sometimes,
    > especially if it is cheaper.


    Depends I guess on what you consider "value". :)

    >
    > Frankly, we spend a lot more on coffee than we do iceberg lettuce. The
    > coffee has almost no nutritional value.


    Disagree.
    Coffee is food for the soul...
    That counts in a different realm IMHO.

    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel

    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  19. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Iceberg lettuce has a lot of nutritional value, but not as much as other
    > > lettuce. If you don't like it, don't buy it. We buy it sometimes,
    > > especially if it is cheaper.

    >
    > Depends I guess on what you consider "value". :)



    OK, fine. Tell me *exactly* where it lacks nutritional value. Be aware
    that I already looked it up, but didn't check every one of those hundred
    categories.

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  20. ~patches~ wrote:
    >
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Ward Abbott <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>What and HOW are you dealing with "rusty" head lettuce. I am so sick
    > >>of buying lettuce and it is almost nasty. Does anyone have a
    > >>suggestion on how to keep it more than two days?
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > Yeah.
    > >
    > > Quit buying Iceberg and switch to leaf or romaine. :)

    >
    > Iceberg lettuce has very little nutritional value. I don't grow it and
    > very seldom buy it. The darker lettuces have a higher nutritional value
    > for your buck.


    Maybe so, but the taste like shit. I don't eat food for
    nutritional value, I eat it for flavor and texture and because
    I'm hungry. The important reasons! ;-)

    Kate


    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]
     
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