OT - what do you use to carry your Digital SLR while cycling ?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Hugh Spicer, Feb 5, 2006.

  1. Hugh Spicer

    Hugh Spicer Guest

    A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags they
    use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera and, most
    importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to take
    shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....

    Hugh Spicer
    ___________________________________
    e: [email protected]
    w3: www.hughspicer.fsnet.co.uk

    msn messenger: [email protected]

    check out the blog at:
    http://hughspicer.blogspot.com/

    new cycling album at:
    http://hughspicer4562.fotopic.net/list_collections.php

    check out the latest digi images at:
    http://photos.wanadoo.co.uk/album/1137378
     
    Tags:


  2. Graham Dean

    Graham Dean Guest

    "Hugh Spicer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    >cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    >wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags they
    >use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera and, most
    >importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to take
    >shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....
    >
    > Hugh Spicer
    > ___________________________________
    > e: [email protected]
    > w3: www.hughspicer.fsnet.co.uk
    >
    > msn messenger: [email protected]
    >
    > check out the blog at:
    > http://hughspicer.blogspot.com/
    >
    > new cycling album at:
    > http://hughspicer4562.fotopic.net/list_collections.php
    >
    > check out the latest digi images at:
    > http://photos.wanadoo.co.uk/album/1137378
    >
    >


    Ortlieb bar bag with camera insert.

    Graham
     
  3. Hugh Spicer wrote:
    > A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    > cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    > wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags they
    > use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera and, most
    > importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to take
    > shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....


    Larry Varney uses a small digicam and a set of the "over the shoulder -
    round the chest" type straps used by birdwatchers for binoculars.
    There's an article about it on the front page of 'bentrideronline at the
    moment

    Alex
     
  4. Ben Barker

    Ben Barker Guest

    I just use my standard "Altura Arran Bar Bag". It can be easily removed
    and carried over the
    shoulder for when the bike is left, and my camera has travelled
    thousands of miles like that.
    It fits in quite snugly lens down, with the rest of the contents of the
    bag stopping
    it from rattling around...

    Ben

    Alexander Rice wrote:
    > Hugh Spicer wrote:
    >
    >> A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    >> cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were
    >> just wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera
    >> bags they use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the
    >> camera and, most importantly, quick access to get the camera out of
    >> the bag to take shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....

    >
    >
    > Larry Varney uses a small digicam and a set of the "over the shoulder -
    > round the chest" type straps used by birdwatchers for binoculars.
    > There's an article about it on the front page of 'bentrideronline at the
    > moment
    >
    > Alex
     
  5. R. Murphy

    R. Murphy Guest

    I often carry a (non-digital_ SLR in a pannier bag on the back of the bike,
    but I keep the camera in a "holster" type case, and ensure it sits on top
    of, and surrounded by, shock-absorbing stuff like fleece or other clothing.
    But I only do this on-road, I wouldn't risk the vibration etc of bouncing
    along off-road tracks.


    "Hugh Spicer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    >cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    >wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags they
    >use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera and, most
    >importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to take
    >shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....
    >
    > Hugh Spicer
    > ___________________________________
    > e: [email protected]
    > w3: www.hughspicer.fsnet.co.uk
    >
    > msn messenger: [email protected]
    >
    > check out the blog at:
    > http://hughspicer.blogspot.com/
    >
    > new cycling album at:
    > http://hughspicer4562.fotopic.net/list_collections.php
    >
    > check out the latest digi images at:
    > http://photos.wanadoo.co.uk/album/1137378
    >
    >
    >
     
  6. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Hugh Spicer wrote:
    > A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    > cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    > wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags they
    > use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera and, most
    > importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to take
    > shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....


    Easy.. bar bag with appropriate padding.

    My current photographic problem poses a few more problems. I have just
    bought a view camera cheap on eBay (Calumet CC400) - one of these
    http://www.angelfire.com/wi/onloc/cameras.html - and am looking at
    getting to remote (read - off road-) locations. I will be taking a
    sturdy tripod with me, probably a surveyors tripod.

    Any suggestions for how I carry that lot? And training schedules to be
    able to pedal with it.
    As vibration is not really an issue (wrap the lenses in decent padding
    in a bar bag, and the camera body will do fine with minimal padding,
    possibly in a rack bag or a custom made bag. And fitting the film
    holders etc into panniers will be easy.

    ...d
     
  7. R. Murphy

    R. Murphy Guest

    "David Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Hugh Spicer wrote:
    >> A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    >> cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    >> wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags
    >> they
    >> use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera and, most
    >> importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to take
    >> shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....

    >
    > Easy.. bar bag with appropriate padding.
    >
    > My current photographic problem poses a few more problems. I have just
    > bought a view camera cheap on eBay (Calumet CC400) - one of these
    > http://www.angelfire.com/wi/onloc/cameras.html - and am looking at
    > getting to remote (read - off road-) locations. I will be taking a
    > sturdy tripod with me, probably a surveyors tripod.
    >
    > Any suggestions for how I carry that lot? And training schedules to be
    > able to pedal with it.


    I was going to suggest a sturdy monopod - until I saw what sort of camera
    you have.

    Seriously though - I don't honestly think you could take this lot on a bike,
    and keep control of the bike, and avoid damage to the kit, especially if it
    rains ....

    Land-rover perhaps?

    > As vibration is not really an issue (wrap the lenses in decent padding
    > in a bar bag, and the camera body will do fine with minimal padding,
    > possibly in a rack bag or a custom made bag. And fitting the film
    > holders etc into panniers will be easy.
    >
    > ..d
    >
     
  8. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Hugh Spicer
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    > cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    > wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags
    > they use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera
    > and, most importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to
    > take
    > shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....


    What sort of cycling do you do? I used to keep mine in the top of my bar
    bag, which is easy to grab and OK for on road cycling but too vulnerable
    for anything adventurous off-road. I sometimes carry it carefully padded
    in a rucksack off road, but you risk falling on it.

    Frankly as my cycling has got faster I no longer carry the camera very
    often - it's just too vulnerable for the sort of cycling I now do.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Due to financial constraints, the light at the end of the tunnel
    has been switched off.
     
  9. daren

    daren Guest

    >
    > My current photographic problem poses a few more problems. I have just
    > bought a view camera cheap on eBay (Calumet CC400) - one of these
    > http://www.angelfire.com/wi/onloc/cameras.html - and am looking at
    > getting to remote (read - off road-) locations. I will be taking a
    > sturdy tripod with me, probably a surveyors tripod.
    >
    > Any suggestions for how I carry that lot? And training schedules to be
    > able to pedal with it.
    > As vibration is not really an issue (wrap the lenses in decent padding
    > in a bar bag, and the camera body will do fine with minimal padding,
    > possibly in a rack bag or a custom made bag. And fitting the film
    > holders etc into panniers will be easy.
    >
    > ..d


    I'd use a mono-wheeled trailer for the camera and used the BIKE as the
    tripod with suitable bracing, ESGE twinleg stand with something for the
    feet (possibly tend guy ropes? and remove the saddle and replace with
    home-made camera mount in seat post. That camera has to weigh less than
    you do surely?

    regards,
    daren
    --
    remove outer garment for reply
     
  10. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    daren wrote:
    > >
    > > My current photographic problem poses a few more problems. I have just
    > > bought a view camera cheap on eBay (Calumet CC400) - one of these
    > > http://www.angelfire.com/wi/onloc/cameras.html - and am looking at
    > > getting to remote (read - off road-) locations. I will be taking a
    > > sturdy tripod with me, probably a surveyors tripod.
    > >
    > > Any suggestions for how I carry that lot? And training schedules to be
    > > able to pedal with it.
    > > As vibration is not really an issue (wrap the lenses in decent padding
    > > in a bar bag, and the camera body will do fine with minimal padding,
    > > possibly in a rack bag or a custom made bag. And fitting the film
    > > holders etc into panniers will be easy.
    > >
    > > ..d

    >
    > I'd use a mono-wheeled trailer for the camera and used the BIKE as the
    > tripod with suitable bracing, ESGE twinleg stand with something for the
    > feet (possibly tend guy ropes? and remove the saddle and replace with
    > home-made camera mount in seat post. That camera has to weigh less than
    > you do surely?


    The camera is only a few kilos. I don't want to use the bike as a
    tripod. That is not really practical. I may resort to Worf (the
    trailer) for on road/trail, and more creative solutions, possibly
    involving a rucksack, for more robust terrain. I don't think the camera
    will be damaged. These things are extremely robust - the kind of thing
    that was trekked around the country on wagons and mule trains. It is
    the modern cameras with hitech shutters and electronics that really
    suffer.

    ...d
     
  11. Mark McNeill

    Mark McNeill Guest

    Response to David Martin:
    > My current photographic problem poses a few more problems. I have just
    > bought a view camera cheap on eBay (Calumet CC400) - one of these
    > http://www.angelfire.com/wi/onloc/cameras.html - and am looking at
    > getting to remote (read - off road-) locations. I will be taking a
    > sturdy tripod with me, probably a surveyors tripod.


    It was the tripod which did for me, at least in large-format-camera-on-
    a-bike terms. The field camera went into a medium-sized rucsack
    [along with lens, darkslides, cloth, lightmeter, spotmeter, grey card,
    filters, focusing-on-the-ground-glass-thingy and I forget what else];
    but the only tripod I had which would take the camera safely was a big
    old wooden theodolite tripod, which I used with a modern tripod's tilt
    head. The only way I could take it was over the shoulder with a strap,
    like a rifle; but it was unbelievably heavy and uncomfortable, and had a
    tendency to slip in a dangerous manner. I never went far at all with
    it, I'm afraid. (I eventually went *right* the other way and bought a
    cheapo half-frame 35mm rangefinder, which I had a lot of fun with; but
    that's another story.)

    If I was doing that these days, I'd bung all the camera stuff in a
    couple of panniers and be looking at dedicated tripod bags with a padded
    strap - I don't know if anyone does them, but I'm thinking of something
    like the bag a roll-up projector screen would come in; but I suspect it
    would still probably be nasty and unsafe on a bike for any length of
    time. That, or a trailer with the tripod sticking out the back.


    --
    Mark, UK
    "I worry that the person who thought up Muzak may be thinking up
    something else."
     
  12. Wally

    Wally Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > The camera is only a few kilos. I don't want to use the bike as a
    > tripod. That is not really practical. I may resort to Worf (the
    > trailer) for on road/trail, and more creative solutions, possibly
    > involving a rucksack, for more robust terrain.


    Wouldn't a surveyor's tripod be rather heavy, perhaps unneccesarily so? Can
    a pan/tilt head be fitted to one without having to get a special adapter
    made?

    To carry with a rucksack, I suspect it would have to be a fairly big sack -
    a large tripod would just swing and dangle from something like a daysack and
    no doubt jab you in the leg sooner or later. Manfrotto make a range of
    padded and unpadded tripod bags - I dare say others do as well.

    I have a fairly heavy (4kg) Manfrotto tripod with a shoulder strap, but no
    bag - the thing's literally a pain to carry for more than a few metres (ie,
    to the car). I am planning to get a bag at some point. Mine has a levelling
    gizmo between the tripod and the pan/tilt head which really works. I slacken
    it off, set it level, tighten, and then attach the camera (quick release
    plate). The pan/tilt is always set right after that - way, way easier than
    fiddling with leg lengths or hoping that the ground will soft enough to
    shove them down a bit. The nice thing about Manfrottos is that you can buy
    the bits and put together your own custom tripod - legs which give lots of
    viewpoint options, the leveller, independently locking damped pan/tilt, and
    spikey/rubbery feet. I use it for video, and got a tripod that I'm really
    pleased with. Set me back 250 notes from an eBay seller who was very helpful
    with sorting out a spec that would suit my needs.


    --
    Wally
    www.wally.myby.co.uk
    http://iott.melodolic.com
     
  13. Tim Binns

    Tim Binns Guest

    On Sun, 5 Feb 2006 19:10:13 -0000, "Hugh Spicer"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >A friend and I have recently invested in a couple of Canon Digital SLR
    >cameras - to record some of our cycling adventures....... We were just
    >wondering if anyone out there can advise on which type of camera bags they
    >use (while on the bike) which offers protection for the camera and, most
    >importantly, quick access to get the camera out of the bag to take
    >shots...... Any info would be greatly appreciated....
    >


    If I absolutely *must* bring the camera, then I stash it in a peli
    case, lob it in the boot of the Rolls and have my man follow behind
    at a discrete distance.
     
  14. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Wally wrote:
    > David Martin wrote:
    >
    > > The camera is only a few kilos. I don't want to use the bike as a
    > > tripod. That is not really practical. I may resort to Worf (the
    > > trailer) for on road/trail, and more creative solutions, possibly
    > > involving a rucksack, for more robust terrain.

    >
    > Wouldn't a surveyor's tripod be rather heavy, perhaps unneccesarily so? Can
    > a pan/tilt head be fitted to one without having to get a special adapter
    > made?


    About 5 kilos for a lighweight one - but it is a fraction of the price
    of any of the other credible options. It is possible to fit an
    appropriate adapter to take a suitable head.

    >
    > To carry with a rucksack, I suspect it would have to be a fairly big sack -
    > a large tripod would just swing and dangle from something like a daysack and
    > no doubt jab you in the leg sooner or later. Manfrotto make a range of
    > padded and unpadded tripod bags - I dare say others do as well.


    I was thinking of a frame rucksack which could be adjusted to carry
    whatever.

    > I have a fairly heavy (4kg) Manfrotto tripod with a shoulder strap, but no
    > bag - the thing's literally a pain to carry for more than a few metres (ie,
    > to the car).

    I have a lightweight tripod that is fine to carry on the bike. The Q/R
    plate is not up to the job for holding the view camera though. Very
    wobbly so no good for any kind of wind.

    > I am planning to get a bag at some point. Mine has a levelling
    > gizmo between the tripod and the pan/tilt head which really works. I slacken
    > it off, set it level, tighten, and then attach the camera (quick release
    > plate). The pan/tilt is always set right after that - way, way easier than
    > fiddling with leg lengths or hoping that the ground will soft enough to
    > shove them down a bit.


    I was planning on getting a pan/tilt head or a ball.

    > The nice thing about Manfrottos is that you can buy
    > the bits and put together your own custom tripod - legs which give lots of
    > viewpoint options, the leveller, independently locking damped pan/tilt, and
    > spikey/rubbery feet. I use it for video, and got a tripod that I'm really
    > pleased with. Set me back 250 notes from an eBay seller who was very helpful
    > with sorting out a spec that would suit my needs.


    Well thats the thing. I don't have 250 to spend on a tripod. This is a
    hobby rather than a profession (though it would be nice to sell the odd
    picture or two). I'm trying to get a sturdy tripod for not very much
    money. Adapters between different threads should be very easy to make.
    So it doesn't look like there is much difference in weight between the
    two (except in the wallet department.) It also will give me a good
    height extension - up to about 6 ft, so I may also need to take a small
    stepladder ;-)

    ...d
     
  15. David Martin wrote:
    > [carrying a large tripod]
    > I was thinking of a frame rucksack which could be adjusted to carry
    > whatever.


    Works for the army carrying rocket launchers and the like ...

    I'd wonder about keeping it on the bike with drainpipe or similar
    attached
    vertically to a rear rack. Awkward for mounting and dismounting.

    > I have a lightweight tripod that is fine to carry on the bike. The Q/R
    > plate is not up to the job for holding the view camera though. Very
    > wobbly so no good for any kind of wind.


    Possible to brace this? Guylines?

    John
     
  16. Wally

    Wally Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > About 5 kilos for a lighweight one - but it is a fraction of the price
    > of any of the other credible options. It is possible to fit an
    > appropriate adapter to take a suitable head.


    That doesn't sound too bad - getting on for 6kg with a head, then.


    > I was thinking of a frame rucksack which could be adjusted to carry
    > whatever.


    Yep, that's the sort of thing - something that's long enough to tie the
    tripod near both ends to stop it swinging about.


    > I have a lightweight tripod that is fine to carry on the bike. The Q/R
    > plate is not up to the job for holding the view camera though. Very
    > wobbly so no good for any kind of wind.


    Before I got the Manfrotto, I bought something for about 35 quid - 'cos
    that's about what I paid for a Slik88 20-odd years ago. It was awful.


    > I was planning on getting a pan/tilt head or a ball.


    I've never been into ball heads, even for stills - no use for panoramas. I
    can see their uses, but not for the main head.


    > Well thats the thing. I don't have 250 to spend on a tripod. This is a
    > hobby rather than a profession (though it would be nice to sell the
    > odd picture or two).


    It's purely a hobby for me, too. At the time, I was reasonably flush after a
    long period of being skint, so I treated myself to something that would do
    the job without being a compromise.


    > I'm trying to get a sturdy tripod for not very
    > much money.


    It's worth looking on eBay - when I was tripod shopping, there was plenty of
    choice.


    > Adapters between different threads should be very easy to
    > make.


    Yup. Just get the right taps and dies - but tools might cost more than a
    stock adapter if such a thing exists. Carbon taps are about 2 quid a pop,
    and a die about 7 quid. If the change of stud size is from big to small,
    you'll be tapping a blind hole and need at least a taper and plug tap (plus
    some careful technique). If it's small to big, the small hole can be through
    rather than blind and a taper tap should manage that. A further
    consideration, if going from big to small, is ensuring that there's enough
    surrounding platform around the small stud for the head to screw down onto
    so that it's stable and not stressing the stud. What size is the stud on a
    surveyor's tripod?


    > So it doesn't look like there is much difference in weight
    > between the two (except in the wallet department.) It also will give
    > me a good height extension - up to about 6 ft, so I may also need to
    > take a small stepladder ;-)


    Or do the kid's unicycle thing and screw wooden blocks to the soles of your
    shoes...


    --
    Wally
    www.wally.myby.co.uk
    http://iott.melodolic.com
     
  17. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Wally wrote:
    > > I have a lightweight tripod that is fine to carry on the bike. The Q/R
    > > plate is not up to the job for holding the view camera though. Very
    > > wobbly so no good for any kind of wind.

    >
    > Before I got the Manfrotto, I bought something for about 35 quid - 'cos
    > that's about what I paid for a Slik88 20-odd years ago. It was awful.


    It is really the qr plate that is crap. This one was very cheap (about
    15 quid) but seems well designed.
    > > I'm trying to get a sturdy tripod for not very
    > > much money.

    >
    > It's worth looking on eBay - when I was tripod shopping, there was plenty of
    > choice.
    >
    >
    > > Adapters between different threads should be very easy to
    > > make.

    >
    > Yup. Just get the right taps and dies - but tools might cost more than a
    > stock adapter if such a thing exists. Carbon taps are about 2 quid a pop,
    > and a die about 7 quid.


    > If the change of stud size is from big to small,
    > you'll be tapping a blind hole and need at least a taper and plug tap (plus
    > some careful technique).

    I'll borrow my dads.. The easy thing is to do two through holes in
    separate pieces, stich a captive bolt in for the camera thread and then
    join the pieces together.

    > If it's small to big, the small hole can be through
    > rather than blind and a taper tap should manage that. A further
    > consideration, if going from big to small, is ensuring that there's enough
    > surrounding platform around the small stud for the head to screw down onto
    > so that it's stable and not stressing the stud. What size is the stud on a
    > surveyor's tripod?


    5/8" wheras a normal camera one is 1/4"

    > > So it doesn't look like there is much difference in weight
    > > between the two (except in the wallet department.) It also will give
    > > me a good height extension - up to about 6 ft, so I may also need to
    > > take a small stepladder ;-)

    >
    > Or do the kid's unicycle thing and screw wooden blocks to the soles of your
    > shoes...


    ;-)

    ...d
     
  18. Wally

    Wally Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > It is really the qr plate that is crap. This one was very cheap (about
    > 15 quid) but seems well designed.


    Put Slik 88 into eBay - there are a few currently around 30 quid or so, one
    ending in a few hours (ally head, heavier than the plastic version). I used
    the plastic head version for years with a Minolta SLR, often with a Vivitar
    Series 1 70-210 zoom (a chunky lens) - never felt the weight was an issue,
    support-wise. Good non-wobble factor in wind, too. Definitely worth a punt,
    in my view.


    > I'll borrow my dads.. The easy thing is to do two through holes in
    > separate pieces, stich a captive bolt in for the camera thread and
    > then join the pieces together.


    Aye, that would work.


    > 5/8" wheras a normal camera one is 1/4"


    If you go down this route, make sure you know what head you're putting on -
    the size for those may be 3/8" (I'm pretty sure the Manfrotto ones are, and
    I think that's pretty universal).


    --
    Wally
    www.wally.myby.co.uk
    http://iott.melodolic.com
     
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