OT: Which SF/Fantasy character are you?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Man o' Tea, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. Man o' Tea

    Man o' Tea Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Make sense that lots of piccards swim. He has a
    > smooth shaved head that allows him to glide better
    > through the water.


    And we don't want No. 1 in the pool.
     



  2. > Hi Andres
    >
    > Your results list is identical to mine.
    > To truly understand your uncle's point of view, take a look at Maus,
    > also a graphic book, by Spiegelman.
    > I am firmly in both camps. I don't mean on the fence either. I'm in
    > total sympathy with both sides. Not so odd. There are many, even a
    > majority of Israelis and Palestinians who know they could get along as
    > in fact they once did.
    > Especially if you have kids, the docu movie, Promises, gives quite a bit
    > of insight into how even children feel about the whole mess.


    Ruth: I am also sympathetic to both sides. I understand that Israel
    will not disappear and that there are a lot of people there that are
    for peace and could get along. I will take a look at Maus. Right now I
    am slowly reading "A History of Israel" by Sachar. It is over 800 pages
    and will take me a while. I am also trying to read Deleuze's
    "Difference and Repetition". It is a lot of fun, but very difficult and
    I read at the rate of five pages a day. I am also suppossed to do a
    review for a friend who wrote "A Ring side Seat to the Revolution"
    (David Romo). Its a book about the history of El Paso and Juarez from
    the late 1800s until 1927, or so. It talks about the Mexican
    revolution, the history of immigration in this country and the not so
    great honor that El Paso has, of using Cyclone B with migrants before
    the Nazis used it with Jews. It is written from the perspective of the
    people, sort of a la Howard Zinn.

    Talking about people getting along, "Gorazde" by Sacco is very
    interesting. It shows how Serbians and Muslims who grew up playing,
    drinking, going to school, shopping, living and partying together
    can, from one day to the next, start killing each other for no reason
    beyond the fact that we are all a bunch of horrible, unprincipled,
    unethical and ammoral creatures.

    Anyways, next week I'll be in Tulum, Mexico, swimming with the fish,
    snorkeling all day, and drinking colorful stuff with little umbrellas
    while catching up on my reading.

    Andres
     
  3. rtk

    rtk Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    It is written from the perspective of the
    > people, sort of a la Howard Zinn.


    I don't have to tell you how much I like Zinn.

    > Talking about people getting along, "Gorazde" by Sacco is very
    > interesting. It shows how Serbians and Muslims who grew up playing,
    > drinking, going to school, shopping, living and partying together
    > can, from one day to the next, start killing each other for no reason
    > beyond the fact that we are all a bunch of horrible, unprincipled,
    > unethical and ammoral creatures.


    I will get Gorazde. Amazing how people mirror their governments stance,
    even against their own friends. This is shown in an odd, but quite
    wonderful Finnish movie, The Cuckoo. Three characters, three languages,
    no on understands the other, but the government's attitude determines
    the behavior of the two men.

    >
    > Anyways, next week I'll be in Tulum, Mexico, swimming with the fish,
    > snorkeling all day, and drinking colorful stuff with little umbrellas
    > while catching up on my reading.
    >

    Go ahead, make us feel bad. A little umbrella, a pretty fish, a small
    wave, a dainty coral. We have ice and snow.


    > Andres


    ruth
    >
     
  4. Joskin

    Joskin Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Hi Andres
    >>
    >> Your results list is identical to mine.
    >> To truly understand your uncle's point of view, take a look at Maus,
    >> also a graphic book, by Spiegelman.
    >> I am firmly in both camps. I don't mean on the fence either. I'm in
    >> total sympathy with both sides. Not so odd. There are many, even a
    >> majority of Israelis and Palestinians who know they could get along as
    >> in fact they once did.
    >> Especially if you have kids, the docu movie, Promises, gives quite a bit
    >> of insight into how even children feel about the whole mess.

    >
    > Ruth: I am also sympathetic to both sides. I understand that Israel
    > will not disappear and that there are a lot of people there that are
    > for peace and could get along. I will take a look at Maus. Right now I
    > am slowly reading "A History of Israel" by Sachar. It is over 800 pages
    > and will take me a while. I am also trying to read Deleuze's
    > "Difference and Repetition". It is a lot of fun, but very difficult and
    > I read at the rate of five pages a day. I am also suppossed to do a
    > review for a friend who wrote "A Ring side Seat to the Revolution"
    > (David Romo). Its a book about the history of El Paso and Juarez from
    > the late 1800s until 1927, or so. It talks about the Mexican
    > revolution, the history of immigration in this country and the not so
    > great honor that El Paso has, of using Cyclone B with migrants before
    > the Nazis used it with Jews. It is written from the perspective of the
    > people, sort of a la Howard Zinn.
    >
    > Talking about people getting along, "Gorazde" by Sacco is very
    > interesting. It shows how Serbians and Muslims who grew up playing,
    > drinking, going to school, shopping, living and partying together
    > can, from one day to the next, start killing each other for no reason
    > beyond the fact that we are all a bunch of horrible, unprincipled,
    > unethical and ammoral creatures.


    Perhaps we are too easily manipulated by our politicians. This quote is from
    a German
    but it could easily be refering to here in the UK. How about the USA ?
    "Why of course the people don't want war. Why should some poor slob on a
    farm want to risk his life in a war when the best he can get out of it is to
    come back to his farm in one piece? Naturally the common people don't want
    war: neither in Russia, nor in England, nor for that matter in Germany. That
    is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who
    determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people
    along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a
    parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can
    always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have
    to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the peacemakers for
    lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in
    any country." -Hermann Goering

    >
    > Anyways, next week I'll be in Tulum, Mexico, swimming with the fish,
    > snorkeling all day, and drinking colorful stuff with little umbrellas
    > while catching up on my reading.
    >
    > Andres
    >

    Joskin
     
  5. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    Liz D wrote:
    > rtk wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] (Larry Weisenthal) wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>http://www.beliefnet.com/story/76/story_7665_1.html
    >>>

    >>
    >>Well, that was interesting. My present state of mind was 100% humanist,
    >>but my upbringing was at the bottom with an 11%. Having never actually
    >>revolted against my beginnings, I sure did travel.
    >>

    >
    >
    > I got 100% Unitarian Universalism, and interesting next best was
    > Liberal Quakers at 89%. I also got Neo Pagans 5th at 74%.
    >
    > Roman Catholic, the faith of my upbringing, scored 3rd from bottom at
    > 26%. Well, at least there's some vestiges of it left (especially the
    > guilt - I'm still really good at that).
    >
    > So it seems that we have quite a few Jean-Luc Picard Unitarians or
    > Humanists who swim.
    >
    > Liz D
    >

    Another UA here. It seems that I'm a UA Swedish Valhund, which has
    totally altered my sense of identity. I'll bark about anything, it
    seems. Kidding, I think the test is a UA conspiracy....
    Madelaine
     
  6. Silver0l

    Silver0l Guest

    <[email protected]> a √©crit dans le message de news:
    [email protected]...

    > Marcus Cole.


    Me too. Strange.
    We should ask him what he thinks about Armstrong doping.... ;-)

    -- Olivier
     
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