other uses for cardamom?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by -L., Jan 28, 2004.

  1. -L.

    -L. Guest

    So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some good
    recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    TIA,

    -L.
     
    Tags:


  2. Cate

    Cate Guest

    [email protected] (-L.) wrote in news:c7b085a.0401281414.49f72c28
    @posting.google.com:

    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    I rub coriander, cumin, and cardamom on chicken breasts and either grill them or sautee them with
    olive oil and butter.

    Cate
     
  3. -L. wrote:
    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > -L.

    Breath freshner; one of the best around!

    --
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    Dum spiro, spero. (Cicero) As long as I breathe, I hope.
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 28 Jan 2004 14:14:42 -0800, [email protected] (-L.) wrote:

    >So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    >won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    >good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    Breath freshener. Just nibble on a few seeds at a time.

    Used extensively in indian and northern african cuisines.

    It's dirt cheap when you buy it at an indian grocer.

    -sw
     
  5. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >: [email protected] (-L.)
    >
    >I got a buttload of cardamom. I'm thinking I won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next
    >year or so, I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    Cardamom makes a pretty good breath freshener... so if you prepare an infusion you can use it to
    douche your rectum... hey, don't blame me... you're the one said "I got a buttload". <g>

    Anyway, if you bought whole pods then not to worry, left in the pods cardamom is good to go for many
    years, especially when stored in an air-tight container in the freezer... should be fine for at
    least 20 years. I have some in my freezer for at least 10 years. I don't use cardamom very often but
    when I do my frozen stash is as potent as the day Penzeys shipped it. I think it was part of my very
    first order, long before Penzeys even had a real catalog... they began life with a few hastily typed
    pages stapled together in one corner.... sometimes yellow paper, sometimes pink. Naturally there
    were no outlet stores back then, no Website either. But Penzeys was far more personable then, only a
    couple of order takers answered their phone, they never rushed and were very pleasant and chatty, so
    it was like what a real shopping experience used to be. Back then every order arrived with samples,
    and all the products bore the packer's hand written signature.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  6. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (-L.) wrote:

    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    For a little change in the morning, I occasionally add some, along with a stick of cinnamon, to my
    drip coffee maker.

    --
    Dan Abel Sonoma State University AIS [email protected]
     
  7. "-L." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > -L.

    You could make vina terta, though it is time consuming and doesn't require a whole lot of cardamom
    (a teaspoon or two maybe).

    rona
    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the inconvenience!***
     
  8. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On 28 Jan 2004 14:14:42 -0800, [email protected] (-L.) wrote:

    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    Look up a recipe for cardamon(m) bread. It's fantastic stuff!

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  9. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "-L." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > -L.

    Chicken Vindaloo? Coffee too...just add some in with the coffee when brewing. Here's a few recipes
    for you; the first one will probably use up your supply
    :) :

    Glogg

    1 c. almonds (about 5 oz.) 1 bottle (25 oz.) Aquavit 1 bottle (25 oz.) claret 6 2 1/2-inch cinnamon
    sticks 1 c. dark, seedless raisins or currants 6 pieces candied orange and/or lemon peel 12 whole
    cloves 12 cardamom pods, peeled 1 c. sugar

    1.. Blanch the almonds.
    2.. Empty the Aquavit and claret into a large stock pot.
    3.. Add to it the almonds, cinnamon sticks, raisins/currants, candied orange/lemon peel, cloves
    and cardamom. Bring slowly to a boil, reduce heat and simmer about 10 minutes.
    4.. Stir in the sugar and continue to simmer until the sugar is completely dissolved.

    -------------------------------------------------------
    Finish Cardamom Tea Cake

    2 c. unbleached flour 2 tsp. freshly ground cardamom 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. baking soda
    5/2 tsp. salt 3 large eggs
    6/4 c. sugar 1 c. sour cream 1 stick butter, melted

    7.. Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease and flour a loaf pan.
    8.. Combine dry ingredients in a bowl and set aside.
    9.. Beat eggs and sugar together until creamy. Add dry ingredients and mix until combined. Mix in
    sour cream and melted butter.
    10.. Pour batter into prepared pan, baking until done, about an hour. Cool in pan for 15 minutes,
    then turn out onto rack and finish cooling
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Norwegian Jewelkake

    11/2 small orange 1 c. water
    12/4 c. golden raisins or currants
    13/2 c. chopped glacé cherries
    14/2 c. chopped citron 1 c. milk 1 package active dry yeast
    15/4 c. warm (110-115°F) water
    16/2 c. butter
    17/2 c. sugar 1 tsp. salt 1 c. sifted unbleached flour 2 tsp. crushed cardamom 3 to 3 1/2 c. sifted
    unbleached flour 1 egg white, lightly beaten

    18.. Wash the orange half well, cut in half again, and run through a food processor and set aside.
    19.. Bring the 1 cup of water to a boil, add raisins or currants and bring to a boil again. Pour
    off the water and drain raisins or currants on a paper towel, setting aside.
    20.. Scald the milk.
    21.. While the milk is heating, dissolve the yeast in the warm water in a small dish, and
    set aside.
    22.. Put the butter, sugar and salt into a large bowl. While the milk is still hot, pour it
    into this bowl. When lukewarm, blend in the 1 cup of flour and the cardamom until the
    mixture is smooth.
    23.. Stir the yeast into the milk mixture, mixing well.
    24.. Add about half of the 3 cups of flour to the mixture, beating until very smooth.
    25.. Add ground orange, raisins or currants, glacé cherries, citron and enough flour to make a
    soft dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and let rest 5-10 minutes.
    26.. Knead dough until smooth and elastic. Form dough into a large ball and place into a deep,
    greased bowl. Turn dough over in bowl to bring greased side to the top. Cover with wax paper
    and a tea towel and let stand in a warm place until dough is doubled.
    27.. Punch dough down, pull edges into the center, turn dough completely over. Let rise again
    until nearly doubled.
    28.. Punch down and turn dough out onto lightly floured surface.
    29.. Lightly grease a 9-inch round cake pan.
    30.. Shape dough into a round ball and place in the greased cake pan, flattening slightly. Cover
    and let rise about 45 minutes, or until doubled.
    31.. Bake at 350°F for about 45 minutes, until it starts to become golden.
    32.. Remove from oven and brush with the egg white. Return to oven and bake another 10 minutes, or
    until lightly browned.
    33.. Let cool 10 minutes on a rack, then remove from pan and continue to cool on racks.

    enjoy, kimberly
     
  10. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    "-L." wrote:
    >
    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > -L.

    Throw a couple in a beef stew with some chilis and a cinn. stick. Make chai like my ex-IL's did:

    Bring 2 cups water with two lightly pounded cardi in it to boil. Add two "fingerfuls" of tea (grasp
    some darjeeling between your thumb and first two finger, as much as you can comgortably hold with
    the fingertips straight and flat against the thumb like chopsticks....if you want stronger tea use
    three fingers, or if you have short fingers), bring back to a boil. Add a cup of milk and sugar to
    taste (more than most westerners, as the boiled tea will have some bitterness) and bring to a boil
    again (important). Strain into small cups and eat with sweets. blacksalt
     
  11. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    "-L." wrote:
    >
    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > -L.

    Oh, and really special, from an old post of mine: <begin paste>

    SAFFRON CARDAMOM ICE CREAM, CIAO BELLA

    2 cups milk 2 cups heavy cream
    1/4 teaspoon saffron threads 8 large egg yolks
    2/4 cup sugar 2 teaspoons ground cardamom
    3/2 cup shelled natural pistachio nuts

    In a heavy saucepan combine the milk, cream, saffron and bring to a boil. Remove pan from heat and
    let cream mixture stand, covered, for 1 hour. Return pan to the heat and bring mixture to just the
    boiling point.

    Meanwhile, in a bowl, whisk egg yolks, sugar and pinch of salt together. Add the cream mixture
    in a steady stream, whisking and pour the entire mixture back into the pan. Cook this custard
    over moderate low heat, stirring until a thermometer reaches 170F. Strain through a fine sieve
    into another bowl and stir in cardamom. Let custard cool completely and freeze in ice cream
    freezer according to manufacturer's recommendations. Add pistachios during last few minutes of
    freezing time.

    Makes 1 1/2 quarts.

    HTH blacksalt
     
  12. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    "-L." wrote:

    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    In a marinade for pork. I had to use up some old cardamom, and put a few ounces in a pork marinade,
    and it was very good. Without checking any recipes for pancetta, I would guess that cardamom is a
    major spice used for pancetta. The pork I marinated reminded me of that great pancetta flavor.

    BTW, what I bought at the Pakistani food store under the name of "cardamom" was much different from
    a jar of some spice my mom bought when I was a kid, which I'm pretty sure was also sold as
    "cardamom". However, the stuff I bought were long green seed pods (about 20 mm x 5 mm x 2 mm) with a
    thin brittle skin containing spherical seeds like mustard. What my mom bought were roughly spherical
    off-white seed pods, about 10 mm in diameter, that were thick and soft, containing small dark seeds
    in the center. Is it possible that there's more than one spice called cardamom?

    I'll have to see if she still has those old ones. Hopefully, she didn't give them away to a food
    pantry. :)
     
  13. Saerah

    Saerah Guest

    -L. wrote in message ...
    >So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    >won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    >good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    >TIA,
    >
    >-L.

    mix it with ground coffee before you brew up a pot. it's yummy.

    --
    Saerah

    TANSTAAFL

    Hangovers only last a day, but a good drinking story lives on forever....
     
  14. Loki

    Loki Guest

    il 28 Jan 2004 14:14:42 -0800, [email protected] (-L.) ha scritto:

    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    You don't say if it's powder or pods. But crush a pod and put into your espresso coffee before it's
    made (i.e. in with the grounds) make Gulab Jamoon desert. Keep it for years, it'll be ok. Eat lots
    of curries. :)
    --
    Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
     
  15. [email protected] (-L.) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Any suggestions?

    JULEKAKE - CARDAMOM BREAD

    Serving Size: 2 Preparation Time: 0:00 Categories: Breads

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    2 1/2 c All-purpose flour 2 pk Active dry yeast
    3/4 ts Ground cardamom 1 1/4 c Milk
    4/2 c Sugar
    5/2 c Butter 1 t Salt 1 Egg 1 c Candied fruits -- optional 1 c Light raisins 2 1/2 c All-
    purpose flour

    In a large mixer bowl combine 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, yeast, and cardamom. In a saucepan heat
    milk, sugar, butter, and salt just till warm (115F) and the butter is almost melted; stir
    constantly. Add heated milk mixture to flour mixture; add 1 egg. Beat at low speed of electric mixer
    for 1/2 minute. Beat 3 minutes at high speed, scraping sides of bowl constantly. Stir in 1 chopped
    mixed candied fruits and peels (optional), raisins, and as much of the 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    as you can mix in with a spoon. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead in enough of the
    remaining all-purpose flour to make a moderately stiff dough that is smooth and elastic (6 to 8
    minutes total). Shape dough into a ball. Place in a lightly greased bowl; turn once to grease
    surface. Cover, let rise in a warm place till double (about 1 1/2 hours). Punch dough down; divide
    dough in half. Cover; let rest 10 minutes. Shape into 2 round loaves; place on greased baking
    sheets. Flatten each slightly to a 6-inch diameter. Cover; let rise till nearly double (45 to 60
    minutes). Stir together 1 slightly beaten egg yolk and 2 tablespoons water, brush over loaves.

    Bake in a 350F oven for 35 minutes or till done. Cool on a wire rack. Makes 2 round loaves.<<<<<

    Derek Juhl
     
  16. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    On 28 Jan 2004 14:14:42 -0800, [email protected] (-L.) wrote:

    >So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    >won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    >good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    >TIA,
    >
    >-L.

    This is a great bread to serve with coffee. I served it when I had some guests from Norway & they
    liked it very much. I used cardamom.

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Fresh Cherry Bread

    Recipe By : The Baking Sheet, End of Summer, 1992 Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Bread-Bakers Mailing List Breads Fruits Hand Made Low Fat

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 Stick Butter -- Softened
    3/4 C Granulated Sugar 2 Eggs -- Beaten 1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract 1 3/4 C King Arthur Unbleached
    All-Purpose Flour
    4/2 Tbsp Coriander -- Or Cardamom
    5/2 Tsp Salt 1 Tbsp Baking Powder 1 C Fresh Pitted Cherries -- *Note

    This recipe uses coriander, the seed of the cilantro plant. It has a mysterious and exotic taste.

    *NOTE: or 1/2 lb unpitted cherries. Diced plums also work well.

    Preheat oven to 350 deg F. Grease a 9 x 5" loaf pan.

    Cream the butter and sugar together. Add eggs and extract.

    Soft dry ingredients together and add to wet ingredients. Stir in the cherries and mix
    until combined.

    Spoon batter into loaf pan. Bake for 45 - 55 min. Insert a skewer or cake tester; it will come out
    dry when the bread is done. Cool for 10 min in the pan and turn out on a rack to fully cool. This
    is best eaten the next day.

    Yield 1 loaf

    This recipe is from The Baking Sheet, King Arthur Flour Co., P.O. Box 876, Norwich, VT 05055, tel
    802-649-3717.

    Denise, Brian & Wyatt (May 31, 02)

    How much Healthy Choice ice cream can I eat before it's no longer a healthy choice?
     
  17. Donna Pattee

    Donna Pattee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    -L. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    >won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    >good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    >TIA,
    >
    >-L.

    Kulich, a Russian holiday bread flavored with cardomom.

    Use it instead of ginger or cinnamon in all kinds of recipes.

    Swedish waffles flavored with cardomom.

    Moroccan (sp?) carrot salad with grated carrots, orange juice, golden raisins.

    Quite a few Indian main dishes use cardomom.
     
  18. Mr. Wizard

    Mr. Wizard Guest

    "-L." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > -L.
    >
    This is a fantastic soup.

    Carrot Cardamom Soup 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium white onion, chopped 3 tablespoons chopped
    peeled fresh ginger 1 tablespoon ground Cardamom
    1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
    2/2 teaspoon chili powder
    3/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 6 large carrots, peeled and sliced 1/4-inch 1 large pie apple diced
    fine 1 red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, 1/4-inch dice 1 medium Idaho potato, peeled and 1/2-inch
    dice 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and 1/2 inch dice 8 cups Chicken Stock 2 cups dry white wine 1
    1/2 tablespoon (packed) light brown sugar
    4/2 cup fresh lime juice
    5/2 cup chopped fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, in
    pieces salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste lime slices, for garnish

    Heat olive oil in a large nonreactive stockpot over medium heat. Add the onion, ginger, spices,
    carrots, apple, red pepper and potatoes. Stir to coat the vegetables with the spices and then sauté
    until the onion is translucent. About 15 minutes.

    Add the chicken stock, white wine, and brown sugar. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to low, cover
    and simmer About 30 to 40 minutes. Remove from the heat.

    Use a stick blender and process until smooth. Return the soup to the pot and reheat over low heat.
    Stir in the lime juice and parsley; add the butter and salt and pepper and heat until the butter is
    melted. Serve in bowl garnished with a lime slice.
     
  19. Tanya Quinn

    Tanya Quinn Guest

    [email protected] (-L.) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    > won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    > good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?

    What kind of cardamom do you have? It is sold in different forms - 1. pods - both green and black
    (green is generally more expensive and better flavours), 2. seeds from inside the pods, 3. ground.
    Cardamom pods are good for Indian curries. You might use the seeds to make your own curry powder or
    garam masala. You can of course put the seeds in a coffee grinder to get ground.. and with ground
    you can use it for baking - breads, chocolate chip cookies etc.

    As an aside, I was planning on making some balti butter chicken at my parents in a smallish totally
    whitebread kinda town on Xmas eve, and had left my bag at home where I had my spices. I went into a
    large supermarket, and asked the guy in the bulk foods section if they had any cardamom pods. He's
    like Carda-WHAT?? like I was speaking some kinda of strange language :) So the dish didn't end up
    being so good minus a few key spices that I couldn't locate.
     
  20. On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 15:57:42 -0800, [email protected] (Dan Abel) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (-L.) wrote:
    >
    >> So, I bought a buttload of cardamom for a dessert I made last week (rava kassari). I'm thinking I
    >> won't be using a whole lot of this stuff over the next year or so, unless I can conjure up some
    >> good recipes. I don't want it to go to waste - it was pretty expensive. Any suggestions?
    >
    >
    >For a little change in the morning, I occasionally add some, along
    with a
    >stick of cinnamon, to my drip coffee maker.

    FYI The cardamom plants in my yard are ready to be harvested right now. The pods grow along shoots
    at the base of the plant and you pick each one off. The cardamom plant's flower looks like a ginger
    flower and the plant is indeed from the ginger (at least ornamental) family.

    I plan to dehydrate the "crop".

    aloha, Thunder http://www.smithfarms.com Farmers & Sellers of 100% Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
     
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