Overhauling Campy Record 8 spd rear hub

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fredrick, May 5, 2003.

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  1. Fredrick

    Fredrick Guest

    I am overhauling an 8 speed rear Campy Record hub for he first time and need some help with the
    dis-assembly. I went to the campy web site to download instructions/diagrams but they only go back
    to 1998 which covers 9 speed hubs. I was told by the seller t very component on the bike was campy
    Record. This rear hub has the circular clip in the middle of the hub to cover the oil/grease port
    which I think is a only a feature of the Record model.

    Here's what I have done so far. The non-drive side of the axel has the traditional curled nut that
    binds on the inside of the dropout, and a lock nut, both of which take 14mm cone wrenches. The drive
    side of axel has a curled nut but it has not lock nut. Instead, it is held in place with a small
    (2.5mm) allen screw that torques down onto the axel. So I loosened the 2.5mm allen screw, and
    removed the drive side curled nut, a flat washer under that, and a split washer under that. Then the
    freehub body slid off exposing three pawls and with small cylindrical springs under each pawl.

    The problem is now the axle didn't slide out towards the non-drive side as I thought it would. I
    didn't want to remove the curled nut & locknut off the axle on the non-drive side because I didn't
    want to have to readjust the axle's left to right position in the hub upon re-assembly. But is it
    necessary to remove the non-drive side curled nut and lock nut to remove the axle and to access the
    hub bearings?

    Next question is about the bearings. Are the two sets of bearings in the hub body and in the single
    set in the end of the freehub cartridge bearings? The one on the drive side of the hub and the outer
    end of the freehub look like cartridge bearings. There is a wide black flat rubber gasket covering
    each which is surrounded by a shiny silver ring that looks like the outer edge of a cartidge bearing
    race. Or are they traditional loose ball bearings that I can remove (maybe by prying off the black
    rubber gasket). In either case, how do I disassemble them or replace them? And how should I clean,
    grease and re-assemble them?

    Thanks in advance.

    --
    Fredrick
     
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  2. Suzy Jackson

    Suzy Jackson Guest

    "Fredrick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I am overhauling an 8 speed rear Campy Record hub for he first time and need some help with the
    > dis-assembly. I went to the campy web site to download instructions/diagrams but they only go back
    > to 1998 which covers 9 speed hubs. I was told by the seller t very component on the bike was campy
    > Record. This rear hub has the circular clip in the middle of the hub to cover the oil/grease port
    > which I think is a only a feature of the Record model.

    The 8 speed hubs are identical to the early 9 speed ones, with the exception of the freehub body, so
    the instructions on the Campy website are still applicable.

    Note that the 8 speed Chorus hubs also had a grease port. The only difference in these hubs between
    Chorus and Record is the use of titanium bits in the Record ones, and a nicer QR.

    > The problem is now the axle didn't slide out towards the non-drive side as I thought it would. I
    > didn't want to remove the curled nut & locknut off the axle on the non-drive side because I didn't
    > want to have to readjust the axle's left to right position in the hub upon re-assembly. But is it
    > necessary to remove the non-drive side curled nut and lock nut to remove the axle and to access
    > the hub bearings?

    The axle has a step in the middle of it, unlike older freewheel axles, which were a constant
    diameter for their length. The right side cone is actually part of the axle. So in order to remove
    the freehub, you remove the right side locknut, but to get to the bearings you remove the left side
    locknut and cone.

    > Next question is about the bearings. Are the two sets of bearings in the hub body and in the
    > single set in the end of the freehub cartridge bearings?

    There are two cartridge bearings inside the freehub, in addition to two sets of normal loose
    bearings in the hub itself. The role of the cartridge bearings is simply to allow the freehub to
    spin relative to the rest of the hub and axle. Usually these don't need any attention, as they don't
    carry much load in service.

    Regards,

    Suzy

    --
    ---
    Suzy Jackson [email protected] http://www.suzyj.net
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Fredrick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am overhauling an 8 speed rear Campy Record hub for he first time and need some help with the
    > dis-assembly. I went to the campy web site to download instructions/diagrams but they only go back
    > to 1998 which covers 9 speed hubs. I was told by the seller t very component on the bike was campy
    > Record. This rear hub has the circular clip in the middle of the hub to cover the oil/grease port
    > which I think is a only a feature of the Record model.
    >
    > Here's what I have done so far. The non-drive side of the axel has the traditional curled nut
    > that binds on the inside of the dropout, and a lock nut, both of which take 14mm cone wrenches.
    > The drive side of axel has a curled nut but it has not lock nut. Instead, it is held in place
    > with a small (2.5mm) allen screw that torques down onto the axel. So I loosened the 2.5mm allen
    > screw, and removed the drive side curled nut, a flat washer under that, and a split washer under
    > that. Then the freehub body slid off exposing three pawls and with small cylindrical springs
    > under each pawl.
    >
    > The problem is now the axle didn't slide out towards the non-drive side as I thought it would. I
    > didn't want to remove the curled nut & locknut off the axle on the non-drive side because I didn't
    > want to have to readjust the axle's left to right position in the hub upon re-assembly. But is it
    > necessary to remove the non-drive side curled nut and lock nut to remove the axle and to access
    > the hub bearings?
    >
    > Next question is about the bearings. Are the two sets of bearings in the hub body and in the
    > single set in the end of the freehub cartridge bearings? The one on the drive side of the hub and
    > the outer end of the freehub look like cartridge bearings. There is a wide black flat rubber
    > gasket covering each which is surrounded by a shiny silver ring that looks like the outer edge of
    > a cartidge bearing race. Or are they traditional loose ball bearings that I can remove (maybe by
    > prying off the black rubber gasket). In either case, how do I disassemble them or replace them?
    > And how should I clean, grease and re-assemble them?

    Generally, bicycle rear hubs are disassembled from the left,as is the standard practice here. The
    center cone cannot easily be removed as you have the hub now.

    So remove the left locknut and cone, saving the bearings and then remove the center bearings and
    save them also in order to buy the correct sizes and rebuild with the correct count ( don't actually
    reuse the balls).

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. On Mon, 05 May 2003 21:49:31 +0000, Suzy Jackson wrote:

    > There are two cartridge bearings inside the freehub, in addition to two sets of normal loose
    > bearings in the hub itself. The role of the cartridge bearings is simply to allow the freehub to
    > spin relative to the rest of the hub and axle. Usually these don't need any attention, as they
    > don't carry much load in service.

    Not really. when coasting, the freehub _and_ the axle are basically still. When pedalling, the
    freehub is under load against the axle, and is rotating around the axle. The Campy design, with the
    right-side bearings basically at the mid-point between the dropouts and no rigidity between the
    freehub and the body, depends completely on the axle to keep from breaking. The freehub bearings are
    integral load-bearing parts. They are lubricated by shooting grease through the grease port on the
    outside of the freehub body (8-speed and early 9/10).

    I must say, though, that although the Campy design is inferior to Shimano's in this respect (Shimano
    hub bearings are very close to the dropout, without that flexible connection between freehub body
    and hub body), I have been amazed that my Campy hubs have had no trouble supporting my mass. I had
    used old Campy freewheel hubs, and regularly broke axles before going to cassette hubs.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | What is objectionable, and what is dangerous about extremists is _`\(,_ | not that they are
    extreme, but that they are intolerant. (_)/ (_) | --Robert F. Kennedy
     
  5. Fredrick-<< I was told by the seller t very component on the bike was campy Record. This rear hub
    has the circular clip in the middle of the hub to cover the oil/grease port which I think is a only
    a feature of the Record model.

    Actually Chorus has this as well before the Record axles went to titanium in 1996...

    << The problem is now the axle didn't slide out towards the non-drive side as I thought it would.

    There is a small cone pressed onto the axle ...the axle only comes outtward the non drive
    side-Taking off the right side stuff only allows you to tsake off the freehub body-

    << Next question is about the bearings. Are the two sets of bearings in the hub body and in the
    single set in the end of the freehub cartridge bearings?

    9 1/4 inch on the far left, 10 7/32 inch under the left side cone, towards the center of the
    huib(you will see these when you take the axle out), two cart bearings in the freehub body. The top
    one is replaceable, the bottom one really isn't.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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