Overshoes

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Ian, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I am thinking about buying some overshoes, can anyone recommend some good ones, I want them
    waterproof but breathable.

    --
    Ian

    http://www.catrike.co.uk
     
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  2. "Ian" skrev...
    > I am thinking about buying some overshoes, can anyone recommend some good ones, I want them
    > waterproof but breathable.

    Breathable? You're not supposed to wear them on your head, you silly trikester. ;-) Does "warm"
    enter into the equation?

    Mikael
     
  3. "Mikael Seierup" skrev...

    > Does "warm" enter into the equation?

    If it does I've tried the BBB Hard Wear booties which aren't. Hard wearing that is. One winter and
    they were shredded in the bottom despite their "open sole" system.
    http://www.bbbparts.com/products/bike_wear/shoecovers/hardwear.html

    This year I tried the Isolator in the hope that the outer layer of rubber would not wear out as
    quickly. Verdict isn't quite in yet.
    http://www.bbbparts.com/products/bike_wear/shoecovers/isolator.html

    Buy a few numbers too big to have room to wiggle your tootsies else they will get cold fast. I'm
    considering chemical pads for really cold weather but have only found expensive ones so far.

    Mikael
     
  4. Gary Mc

    Gary Mc Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<BBFB6AE5.1895A%[email protected]>...
    > I am thinking about buying some overshoes, can anyone recommend some good ones, I want them
    > waterproof but breathable.

    There are Gore Tex socks which are waterproof and allegedly breathable. They might keep the rain off
    your feet though not off your shoes.

    I did notice that Cannondale makes water proof "booties" that they say are breathable. They are
    available in the REI catalog.

    http://www.rei.com/

    But $40 is a lot to pay for an experiment. My experience has been that if it is waterproof, it does
    not breathe enough to let sweat out so your feet become wet any way.

    Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, Salt Lake City
     
  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

    [email protected] (Gary Mc) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > But $40 is a lot to pay for an experiment. My experience has been that if it is waterproof, it
    > does not breathe enough to let sweat out so your feet become wet any way.
    >
    > Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, Salt Lake City

    use a vapor barier, a winter hiking technigue, plastic bread bags work fine... put plastic bags on
    bare feet, put socks over , vapor barrrier willl keep socks dry from sweat. increase warmth about 10
    to 20 degrees degreess when hiking, than u coud use a non breathable shoe or bootie, which is
    cheaper. no reason to use breathable waterprooof material if you have the moisture trapped with the
    vapor barrier. feet will sweat hit their point of saturation. and thats it. its cheeap and worth a
    try. try to find a overboot that is windproof with insulation
     
  6. bentcruiser

    bentcruiser New Member

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  7. Gary Mc

    Gary Mc Guest

    [email protected] (mike) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Gary Mc) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > > But $40 is a lot to pay for an experiment. My experience has been that if it is waterproof, it
    > > does not breathe enough to let sweat out so your feet become wet any way.
    > >
    > > Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, Salt Lake City
    >
    > use a vapor barier, a winter hiking technigue, plastic bread bags work fine... put plastic bags on
    > bare feet, put socks over , vapor barrrier willl keep socks dry from sweat. increase warmth about
    > 10 to 20 degrees degreess when hiking

    Mike,

    By coincidence, I have started using plastic bags under my socks on colder days. Someone on the
    trike list suggested the same. He suggested over and under socks for wet days. It does seem to help
    but my feet come out soaking wet. It is one of tricks that I have added to the arsenal to keep warm
    this winter.

    Gary McCarty, Salt Lake City
     
  8. [email protected] (Gary Mc) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (mike) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > [email protected] (Gary Mc) wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > >
    > > > But $40 is a lot to pay for an experiment. My experience has been that if it is waterproof, it
    > > > does not breathe enough to let sweat out so your feet become wet any way.
    > > >
    > > > Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, Salt Lake City
    > >
    > > use a vapor barier, a winter hiking technigue, plastic bread bags work fine... put plastic bags
    > > on bare feet, put socks over , vapor barrrier willl keep socks dry from sweat. increase warmth
    > > about 10 to 20 degrees degreess when hiking
    >
    > Mike,
    >
    > By coincidence, I have started using plastic bags under my socks on colder days. Someone on the
    > trike list suggested the same. He suggested over and under socks for wet days. It does seem to
    > help but my feet come out soaking wet. It is one of tricks that I have added to the arsenal to
    > keep warm this winter.
    >
    > Gary McCarty, Salt Lake City

    Hi Gary, I think it was Bob Stuart who suggested plastic inside and outside the socks, who got the
    advice from his mother. I tried that trick today: plastic over the feet, then socks, then plastic,
    then shoe, and shoecovers. It does seem to work and you're right, the feet come out soaking wet.
    This is hard to judge, but I think I prefer what I've been doing for 30+ years during winter: thin
    socks (wool would be best, anything that wicks would be OK) and one layer of newspaper, the shoe
    (summer shoe, well ventilated,) then another layer or two of newspaper, and outside of that an old
    sock or shoe cover, with the outer sock cut out at the cleat. If I do a long ride in cold weather,
    say 100 miles, after 50 miles we stop to eat. The newspaper will be soaking wet but the socks will
    be dry and my feet will be warm. I replace the newspaper with fresh pieces and then do the rest of
    the ride. As I said, the plastic right against the skin does seem to work pretty well and it's hard
    to judge, and my feet were OK today on a short ride, but I suspect they would have been even warmer
    with the newspaper. It's an interesting concept: Concentrate on keeping the socks dry, not the feet.
    Strangely, although it did seem to work for my feet, I tried the same experiment with my hands.
    Plastic, then gloves, then plastic, then outer mitten. That didn't seem to work for me. Have you
    tried both methods to see which works better for you? And isn't having a fairing great? Warm
    regards, Byron
     
  9. Mike

    Mike Guest

    [email protected] (Gary Mc) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (mike) wrote in message > > > Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, Salt
    > Lake City
    > >
    > > use a vapor barier, a winter hiking technigue, plastic bread bags work fine... put plastic bags
    > > on bare feet, put socks over , vapor barrrier willl keep socks dry from sweat. increase warmth
    > > about 10 to 20 degrees degreess when hiking
    >
    > Mike,
    >
    > By coincidence, I have started using plastic bags under my socks on colder days. Someone on the
    > trike list suggested the same. He suggested over and under socks for wet days. It does seem to
    > help but my feet come out soaking wet. It is one of tricks that I have added to the arsenal to
    > keep warm this winter.
    >
    > Gary McCarty, Salt Lake City
    vapor barrier is applied on bare foot, socks overneath, your foot will sweat and reach saturation
    point and stay wet, but if thick socks are overneath the socks will stay tottaly dry and your feet
    will be warmer , in hiking you need to dry off at night , otherwise can develop trench foot1. you
    wont lose as much heat from your feet. second bag is probably to use as a wind barrier and outside
    water barrier , you could probably put it over the whole shoe and cut out and duct tape an opening
    for cleats you dont need goretex if using a vapor barrier since there is no breathing, goretex only
    workks weel with breathing when the ambient tempoature is the same , so very cold weather
    applications , gore tex doenst breathe very well. ..
     
  10. Rcpinto

    Rcpinto Guest

    My favorites are the full foot neoprene booties in the Performance catalog, with really walkable
    full rubber soles. Long lasting and pretty warm, not quite totally waterproof though.

    Another old trick (besides the plastic vapor barriers we used for years winter climbing) is
    to hose down your feet with antiperspirant ...totally dry feet without the clammy vapor
    barrier feeling.

    Tailwinds, Rich
     
  11. Gary Mc

    Gary Mc Guest

    [email protected] (Byron Drachman) wrote in message
    > Hi Gary, I think it was Bob Stuart who suggested plastic inside and outside the socks, who got the
    > advice from his mother. I tried that trick today: plastic over the feet, then socks, then plastic,
    > then shoe, and shoecovers. It does seem to work and you're right, the feet come out soaking wet.
    > This is hard to judge, but I think I prefer what I've been doing for 30+ years during winter: thin
    > socks (wool would be best, anything that wicks would be OK) and one layer of newspaper, the shoe
    > (summer shoe, well ventilated,) then another layer or two of newspaper, and outside of that an old
    > sock or shoe cover, with the outer sock cut out at the cleat. If I do a long ride in cold weather,
    > say 100 miles, after 50 miles we stop to eat. The newspaper will be soaking wet but the socks will
    > be dry and my feet will be warm. I replace the newspaper with fresh pieces and then do the rest of
    > the ride. As I said, the plastic right against the skin does seem to work pretty well and it's
    > hard to judge, and my feet were OK today on a short ride, but I suspect they would have been even
    > warmer with the newspaper. It's an interesting concept: Concentrate on keeping the socks dry, not
    > the feet. Strangely, although it did seem to work for my feet, I tried the same experiment with my
    > hands. Plastic, then gloves, then plastic, then outer mitten. That didn't seem to work for me.
    > Have you tried both methods to see which works better for you? And isn't having a fairing great?
    > Warm regards, Byron

    Byron,

    Tried the Newpapers today and it worked. It was not that cold, 25-30 degrees. I rode for about 2
    hours. My problem was not enough room in the shoes, which compressed the sock and the newspaper. I
    am afraid at a cold temp, I would have been uncomfortable.

    I have just about settled on a medium wool sock with toe warmers above the toes where they get the
    most air. I also have covered the toe of my shoe with felt, much the same as your sock idea. That
    combination seems to be best for me.

    Gary
     
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