Overtaking in traffic question

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by davek, Aug 12, 2004.

  1. davek

    davek Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    > the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles


    From the Highway Code, rule 139:
    "only overtake on the left if the vehicle in front is signalling to turn
    right, and there is room to do so"
    <url:http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/15.shtml#139>

    It doesn't say anything about this not applying to cyclists.

    d.
     
    Tags:


  2. "bob watkinson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:p[email protected]:

    > If you use the inside you do it at your peril. Sooner or later some
    > passenger will open a door on you.


    I take it you've never seen a driver open his door in a queue of traffic
    then? It does happen occasionally. Like cars turning right without
    signalling.

    Filtering on the right is better, but you still do so at your own risk.

    > "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    >> the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    >> ?
    >>
    >>
    >> Regards




    --
    Chris
     
  3. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Hi,

    In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    ?


    Regards
     
  4. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Dave wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    > the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    > ?
    >
    >
    > Regards


    Outside but only when it is safe to do so.

    Tony
     
  5. If you use the inside you do it at your peril. Sooner or later some
    passenger will open a door on you.


    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    > the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    > ?
    >
    >
    > Regards
     
  6. Mike James

    Mike James Guest

    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    > the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    > ?
    >
    >
    > Regards


    In nose to tail traffic, its often the case that the other
    side of the road coming in the opposite direction is comparatively
    empty. So you may find that if you cycle down the outside you often
    have the centre of the road and the other carriageway to yourself.

    Passing on the inside in such sitations is often problematic
    because of the odd car that insists on hugging the kerb for no good
    reason. Or in preparation for a left turn a further 200 metres on.

    Mike
     
  7. ..


    "Monkey Hanger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "bob watkinson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:p[email protected]:
    >
    > > If you use the inside you do it at your peril. Sooner or later some
    > > passenger will open a door on you.

    >
    > I take it you've never seen a driver open his door in a queue of traffic
    > then? It does happen occasionally. Like cars turning right without
    > signalling.



    correct i haven't ever seen this though i dare say it may happen. I don't
    suppose though for a minute you are suggesting that this is as likely as a
    passenger opening the door at the near side. Which after all is`what
    MH(hartlepool?)was asking about.

    >
    > Filtering on the right is better, but you still do so at your own risk.
    >
    > > "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> Hi,
    > >>
    > >> In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    > >> the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of

    vehicles
    > >> ?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Regards

    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Chris
    >
     
  8. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake
    > on the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of
    > vehicles ?


    On the right. And go *carefully*.
     
  9. Simonb wrote:
    > Dave wrote:
    >>In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake
    >>on the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of
    >>vehicles ?

    >
    > On the right. And go *carefully*.


    Carefully is the key. Inside and between two lanes is OK too IF
    the motor vehicles have no room to move AND
    you're going slowly enough to stop if a door opens at you.

    On the outside, you may be able to get out of the door zone and go
    faster. If there's a cycle lane on the inside, you may be able to get
    out of the door zone and go faster.

    If the queue is moving, you should be in one of the lanes, even if you
    think you could go faster.

    Colin McKenzie
     
  10. John Mallard

    John Mallard Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake
    > on the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of
    > vehicles ?


    Outside

    The diadvantages of inside are:
    They're less likely to realise you're there and move in on you.
    Passenger door flying open.
    You're restricted to a very narrow line with nowhere to go if you need to
    bail out.
    You'll get left hooked.
    You're riding in the debris of the gutter and you'll get a puncture.
    You'll arive at a point where you can no longer get through.
    AND other cyclists will point and laugh at you.

    The disadvantages of outside are:
    The guy who wants to turn right 50 meters up the road and so suddenly pulls
    out and sprints for it.
    Rear passenger door.
    Day dreamers coming the other way.
    M/c coming the other way riding the white line.
    M/c overtaking.
    Fag ash or fag coming out of drivers window.

    Me, I go outside.

    --
    Cheerful Pedalling
    John Mallard
     
  11. > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    > the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    > ?


    A lot of both. Basically, go for the outside, but nowt wrong with the
    inside if you're bloody careful. Watch out for left turners, peds, doors,
    and oncoming cars turning right. A lot of left turners won't be turning
    right, but parking on the right which is an easy way to splat cyclists as
    you turn in sooner than the cyclist expects.
     
  12. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake
    > on the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of
    > vehicles ?


    Outside is generally safer but not always, and it's not always possible or
    at all convenient.

    Inside overtaking can be safe on occasasion if you are careful. Pay extra
    attention near side turnings, especially with long vehicles. If there's
    one absolute "no no", it's undertaking or overtaking a long vehicle when
    it *could* turn into you.

    And to the next cyclist who asks me to get out of their way while I'm
    waiting for a lorry or bus to move: "F*** OFF!!!". I wished I'd actually
    held my ground and said something instead of silently moving over to let
    them get past and risk their life... Got that off my chest now, thanks
    :)

    ~PB
     
  13. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Thu, 12 Aug 2004 21:17:00 +0100, "Mike James" <[email protected]>
    wrote (more or less):

    >
    >"Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    >> the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    >> ?
    >>
    >>
    >> Regards

    >
    >In nose to tail traffic, its often the case that the other
    >side of the road coming in the opposite direction is comparatively
    >empty. So you may find that if you cycle down the outside you often
    >have the centre of the road and the other carriageway to yourself.
    >
    >Passing on the inside in such sitations is often problematic
    >because of the odd car that insists on hugging the kerb for no good
    >reason. Or in preparation for a left turn a further 200 metres on.


    No good reason often includes making sure that no cyclist can get past
    them while they're stuck still.


    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
    Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  14. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Dave wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > In long lines of nose to tail, stop/start traffic, should I overtake on
    > the inside between cars and kerb, or overtake on the outside of vehicles
    > ?


    Either, depending on the situation, but be careful of doors opening, and
    cars making sudden turns (whichever side you choose - inside is probably
    more hazardous in general, but not unreasonably so if you are aware of
    the risks).

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  15. Peter Fox

    Peter Fox Guest

    Following on from Pete Biggs's message. . .
    >Inside overtaking can be safe on occasasion if you are careful. Pay extra
    >attention near side turnings, especially with long vehicles. If there's
    >one absolute "no no", it's undertaking or overtaking a long vehicle when
    >it *could* turn into you.

    * ABSOLUTELY * ABSOLUTELY * ABSOLUTELY *



    Never pass an articulated lorry on the left unless you know _it can't
    move_.

    Never pass any lorry on the left if there is a building site ahead.

    Any entrance/exit ahead can be a trap.





    First choice is RH side but the LH side may be slowly negotiable. The
    reason the LH side is more dangerous with long vehicles is that they can
    squash you without you having anywhere to go - even if you stay
    stationary. At least on the RH side you can /try/ to manoeuvre out of
    the way into some free space.

    Some people don't twig that an articulated lorry or muck wagon may need
    to jiggle about all over the road to turn into where it needs to get to.
    "Hey I can squeeze past now" ... Famous last words.

    --
    PETER FOX Not the same since the exam marking business failed
    [email protected].html
    2 Tees Close, Witham, Essex.
    Gravity beer in Essex <http://www.eminent.demon.co.uk>
     
  16. "Pete Biggs" <pblackcherry{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > And to the next cyclist who asks me to get out of their way while I'm
    > waiting for a lorry or bus to move: "F*** OFF!!!". I wished I'd actually
    > held my ground and said something instead of silently moving over to let
    > them get past and risk their life... Got that off my chest now, thanks
    > :)


    I've had this happen a couple of weeks back, but it was because I'd stopped at a
    red light rather than behind a lorry, and the cyclist behind didn't like having to
    stop.
     
  17. rider

    rider New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    That' s not a dsiadvantage that's fun....

    You'll be a smoker then. :)
     
  18. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On 12 Aug 2004 19:09:37 GMT, Monkey Hanger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "bob watkinson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:p[email protected]:
    >
    > > If you use the inside you do it at your peril. Sooner or later some
    > > passenger will open a door on you.

    >
    > I take it you've never seen a driver open his door in a queue of traffic
    > then?


    Or indeed a back seat passenger.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  19. gavin

    gavin Guest

    "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Pete Biggs" <pblackcherry{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > And to the next cyclist who asks me to get out of their way while I'm
    > > waiting for a lorry or bus to move: "F*** OFF!!!". I wished I'd

    actually
    > > held my ground and said something instead of silently moving over to let
    > > them get past and risk their life... Got that off my chest now, thanks
    > > :)

    >
    > I've had this happen a couple of weeks back, but it was because I'd

    stopped at a
    > red light rather than behind a lorry, and the cyclist behind didn't like

    having to
    > stop.



    IMO I don't think there's a right or wrong way - whichever you chose just
    try and expect the unexpected - shit happens, particularly when you are on
    two wheels!


    Gavin
     
  20. "Ian Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 12 Aug 2004 19:09:37 GMT, Monkey Hanger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > "bob watkinson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > news:p[email protected]:
    > >
    > > > If you use the inside you do it at your peril. Sooner or later some
    > > > passenger will open a door on you.

    > >
    > > I take it you've never seen a driver open his door in a queue of

    traffic
    > > then?

    >
    > Or indeed a back seat passenger.
    >


    Sigh! I refer the honourable gentleman to the answer I gave earlier.

    > regards, Ian SMith
    > --
    > |\ /| no .sig
    > |o o|
    > |/ \|
     
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