Pacemakers and insomnia

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Sandy, May 27, 2004.

  1. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Does anyone here have the dual lead DDD Discovery by
    Guidant? If so is yours set to correct neuro-cardiogenic
    syncope? If so, do you have insomnia? Shit, I've had
    insomnia now for 5 years and I FINALLY am nearing the point
    when I get the new device that will allow sleep. ZZZZZZZZ I
    CAN'T WAIT!!
     
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  2. florald

    florald Guest

    On 26 May 2004 15:19:50 -0700, [email protected] (Sandy) wrote:

    >Does anyone here have the dual lead DDD Discovery by
    >Guidant? If so is yours set to correct neuro-cardiogenic
    >syncope? If so, do you have insomnia? Shit, I've had
    >insomnia now for 5 years and I FINALLY am nearing the point
    >when I get the new device that will allow sleep. ZZZZZZZZ I
    >CAN'T WAIT!!

    I have a Medtronic dual chamber PM that causes no problems
    at all. Its to prevent my heart going below 60 and above 130
    bpm. I also have a mechanical mitral valve with a loud click
    on every beat. My insomnia is more to do with my bladder and
    arthritis but I often sleep quite well. What sensations does
    your PM cause? Diana
     
  3. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Hi, Diana

    Tell me how your pacer prevents you from going over 130
    bpms.

    What mine does, I'll be sound asleep and drop below 60 bpms
    then rivent wide awake as it paces me up to 80 bpms. At that
    point I'm sitting up in bed just wide awake and i'll usually
    go do the dishes or get on the computer and write. It's so
    friggin aggrivating.

    This is to prevent my blood pressure from bottoming out in a
    neuro-cardiogenic syncopal episode. I tell you what, it sure
    is aging me too, I'm just generally tired all the time and
    long for a good nights rest.

    I still go into a stealthy sinus node rapid rate, sometimes
    up to 178 at rest, and mine will dual pace me if the
    synchronicity gets off but it does not convert me.
     
  4. florald

    florald Guest

    On 27 May 2004 16:22:36 -0700, [email protected] (Sandy) wrote:

    >Hi, Diana
    >
    >Tell me how your pacer prevents you from going over
    >130 bpms.
    >
    >What mine does, I'll be sound asleep and drop below 60 bpms
    >then rivent wide awake as it paces me up to 80 bpms. At
    >that point I'm sitting up in bed just wide awake and i'll
    >usually go do the dishes or get on the computer and write.
    >It's so friggin aggrivating.
    >
    >This is to prevent my blood pressure from bottoming out in
    >a neuro-cardiogenic syncopal episode. I tell you what, it
    >sure is aging me too, I'm just generally tired all the time
    >and long for a good nights rest.
    >
    >I still go into a stealthy sinus node rapid rate, sometimes
    >up to 178 at rest, and mine will dual pace me if the
    >synchronicity gets off but it does not convert me.

    Hello Sandy, The thing is, I do not know what neuro
    cardiogenic syncope is. Perhaps this is the difference
    between us. As I understand it, if my heart is about to go
    below 60 or above 130 the PM takes over but I am not aware
    of anything happening. I had heart surgery and a new
    procedure for AF and the rate problems started after that. I
    have paroxysmal AF and flutter and a 2:1 heart block. When I
    go for PM check-ups they have seemed quite happy so far and
    just say how many extra beats I have had and how much longer
    the batteries will last. To me, loss of sleep is a very bad
    thing, always has been, but mine is not caused by the
    noises, bumps and bangs of my heart. Like you I believe it
    is ageing. At the moment I have a sleep during the day and
    still want to sleep at 10pm and I am very disappointed to be
    like this. Best wishes Diana
     
  5. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    [email protected] (Sandy) wrote in message news:<-
    [email protected]>...
    Diana, I would almost bet that our pacer is waking you
    up at night when it paces you as you drop below 60. Ask
    your doc what it's programmed to pace you up to when it
    drops below 60.

    I too had atrial flutter but mine was caused by some scar
    tissue from a previous heart surgery on the right atrial
    chamber so it was pretty easy to ablate.

    Do they have you on blood thinners?
     
  6. florald

    florald Guest

    On 29 May 2004 13:26:20 -0700, [email protected] (Sandy) wrote:

    >[email protected] (Sandy) wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >Diana, I would almost bet that our pacer is waking you up
    >at night when it paces you as you drop below 60. Ask your
    >doc what it's programmed to pace you up to when it drops
    >below 60.
    >
    >I too had atrial flutter but mine was caused by some scar
    >tissue from a previous heart surgery on the right atrial
    >chamber so it was pretty easy to ablate.
    >
    >Do they have you on blood thinners?

    Maybe it does Sandy but, at night, usually my rate is about
    80 and in the morning about 60. It does not go below 60 as
    the PM is programmed not to allow that to happen. That is
    the whole point of having it. My heart rate was all over the
    place before they made the decision to give me the PM. I
    believe all these problems came about because of the mini
    maze open heart treatment I had for AF. When I woke up after
    surgery I was wired up to a pacemaker which I had to carry
    around with me on a pole. This went on for over a week.
    There were three wires into my chest. One day they switched
    it off at the nurses station but did not tell me. I had to
    walk about for a while and I thought I was going to die. It
    had to be switched back on until things settled down.

    Diana
     
  7. florald

    florald Guest

    On 29 May 2004 13:26:20 -0700, [email protected] (Sandy) wrote:

    >
    >Do they have you on blood thinners?

    I forgot to say - yes, for the rest of my life, as is normal
    with a mechanical valve. I used to have it for the AF
    anyway. Now the INR reading needs to be between 3 - 4. Diana
     
  8. [email protected] wrote:

    > On 29 May 2004 13:26:20 -0700, [email protected]
    > (Sandy) wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Do they have you on blood thinners?
    >
    > I forgot to say - yes, for the rest of my life, as is
    > normal with a mechanical valve. I used to have it for
    > the AF anyway. Now the INR reading needs to be between 3
    > - 4. Diana

    That's a bit high for even a mechanical valve. Did you have
    a problem with the more usual 2.5 - 3.5 ?

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    Board-Certified Cardiologist
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  9. florald

    florald Guest

    On Sun, 30 May 2004 20:19:20 GMT, "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> On 29 May 2004 13:26:20 -0700, [email protected]
    >> (Sandy) wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >Do they have you on blood thinners?
    >>
    >> I forgot to say - yes, for the rest of my life, as is
    >> normal with a mechanical valve. I used to have it for
    >> the AF anyway. Now the INR reading needs to be between 3
    >> - 4. Diana
    >
    >That's a bit high for even a mechanical valve. Did you have
    >a problem with the more usual 2.5 - 3.5 ?

    When I was in AF, before the surgery, the INR required was
    2.5- 3.5 but my local hospital have said that, with a
    mechanical valve, they prefer 3 - 4. I do believe the
    hospital where the surgery was carried out entered the lower
    reading on my discharge papers but cannot be sure and too
    tired at the moment to go looking.

    Diana
     
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