paella question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sf, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. Sf

    Sf Guest

    This will be saffron flavored rice with seafood & chorizo,
    no tomatoes.

    It will be served as the main dish at a wedding reception
    (100 people). Tapas will come before that.

    I was thinking perhaps a gewurztraminer and a light red
    wine.

    Do you have any wine suggestions that won't break the bank?
    Of course, Spanish wine suggestions would be great!

    TIA

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
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  2. Puester

    Puester Guest

    sf wrote:
    >
    > This will be saffron flavored rice with seafood & chorizo,
    > no tomatoes.
    >
    > It will be served as the main dish at a wedding reception
    > (100 people). Tapas will come before that.
    >
    > I was thinking perhaps a gewurztraminer and a light
    > red wine.
    >
    > Do you have any wine suggestions that won't break the
    > bank? Of course, Spanish wine suggestions would be great!
    >
    > TIA
    >

    A Sangria punch. Is this being catered? Paella isn't the
    simplest thing to make in such large quantities.

    gloria p
     
  3. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    > wine suggestions that won't break the bank?

    Any old medium-bodied Spanish red, served at about 55
    degrees: my favorites come from Ribero del Duero, but try
    Rioja if you want something oakier.

    I don't know white wines; but pick something really light
    without much acid. Codorniu extra dry cava might be a
    nice option.

    Paella is heavy; the wine should cut through it. (Not
    sangría, please: an Andalucían punch has no business
    with paella.)

    Neil
     
  4. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    I have seen photos and video of paella prepared in a giant
    paellera, perhaps 2 meters in diameter, on a stand over a
    wood fire. Ingredients in 20 liter buckets, wooden rakes
    used to stir the food around. It is apparently pretty
    common at stands at Spanish beach resorts. It would be a
    great show for the guests if the caterer has the equipment
    and can pull it off.

    Good luck and all the best to the happy couple.

    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------
    ----
    Louis Cohen Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8'
    42.8"

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > This will be saffron flavored rice with seafood & chorizo,
    > no tomatoes.
    >
    > It will be served as the main dish at a wedding reception
    > (100 people). Tapas will come before that.
    >
    > I was thinking perhaps a gewurztraminer and a light
    > red wine.
    >
    > Do you have any wine suggestions that won't break the
    > bank? Of course, Spanish wine suggestions would be great!
    >
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  5. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 18:16:47 GMT, Puester
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > A Sangria punch.

    Sangria is definitely in the running.

    > Is this being catered? Paella isn't the simplest thing to
    > make in such large quantities.
    >

    Yes, it's catered. I'm not sure how paella for 100 will turn
    out either - so my fingers are crossed.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  6. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > This will be saffron flavored rice with seafood & chorizo,
    > no tomatoes.
    >
    > It will be served as the main dish at a wedding reception
    > (100 people). Tapas will come before that.
    >
    > I was thinking perhaps a gewurztraminer and a light
    > red wine.
    >
    > Do you have any wine suggestions that won't break the
    > bank? Of course, Spanish wine suggestions would be great!
    >

    Marques de Caceres (Spanish) makes a really nice white for
    about $5 - I think it would be a better fit than a
    gewurztraminer and certainly less expensive than a decent
    gewurztraminer. They also make a very nice red at about the
    same price - not exactly light but not too heavy either.

    Peter Aitken
     
  7. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This will be saffron flavored rice with seafood & chorizo,
    > no tomatoes.
    >
    > It will be served as the main dish at a wedding reception
    > (100 people). Tapas will come before that.
    >
    > I was thinking perhaps a gewurztraminer and a light
    > red wine.
    >
    > Do you have any wine suggestions that won't break the
    > bank? Of course, Spanish wine suggestions would be great!
    >
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments

    Since you are serving a seafood dish, a rose might work. :)
    There are dozens of good White Zinfandels on the market, and
    I've yet to meet anyone that did not like them since they
    are usually a mild, semi-sweet wine?

    Just one idea for ya!

    K.

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  8. sf <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > This will be saffron flavored rice with seafood & chorizo,
    > no tomatoes.
    >
    > It will be served as the main dish at a wedding reception
    > (100 people). Tapas will come before that.
    >
    > I was thinking perhaps a gewurztraminer and a light
    > red wine.
    >
    > Do you have any wine suggestions that won't break the
    > bank? Of course, Spanish wine suggestions would be great!
    >
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments

    There are nice Spanish sparkling wines you could serve:
    Freixenet is a widely-distributed brand, and a couple
    cases of their Carta Nevada or even Cordon Negro won't
    break the bank.

    --
    Chris Green
     
  9. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Christopher Green) wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > This will be saffron flavored rice with seafood &
    > > chorizo, no tomatoes.
    > >
    > > It will be served as the main dish at a wedding
    > > reception (100 people). Tapas will come before that.
    > >
    > > I was thinking perhaps a gewurztraminer and a light
    > > red wine.
    > >
    > > Do you have any wine suggestions that won't break the
    > > bank? Of course, Spanish wine suggestions would be
    > > great!
    > >
    > >
    > > TIA
    > >
    > >
    > > Practice safe eating - always use condiments
    >
    > There are nice Spanish sparkling wines you could serve:
    > Freixenet is a widely-distributed brand, and a couple
    > cases of their Carta Nevada or even Cordon Negro won't
    > break the bank.

    As long as it's not Brut' ;-p More people like Spumante.

    IMHO Ballatore is better than Freixenet and less expensive.

    Personally, I can't stand Freixenet!

    Apologies......

    d.

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  10. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    >It would be a great show for the guests if the caterer has
    >the equipment and can pull it off.

    It would be very unlikely for a U.S.-based wedding caterer
    to do anything more than make something like jambalaya and
    transfer it to a steam table for serving. The inclusion of
    "chorizo" in this paella, although one sometimes sees it in
    Spain, is not an encouraging sign.

    There are too few Spanish restaurants in the U.S. that make
    an acceptable paella for me to believe there are many
    professional caterers with the staff, tools, and insight to
    make it for 100, especially when the market makes so few
    demands for quality.

    Neil
     
  11. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On 14 Mar 2004 16:02:37 GMT, [email protected] (WardNA) wrote:

    > >It would be a great show for the guests if the caterer
    > >has the equipment and can pull it off.
    >
    > It would be very unlikely for a U.S.-based wedding
    > caterer to do anything more than make something like
    > jambalaya and transfer it to a steam table for serving.

    Personally, if it turns out looking like a saffron Jambalaya
    (no tomatoes) - that will be fine with me. My requirement is
    for it to taste good. I'm not expecting the "look" of Spain,
    just a taste or two.

    > The inclusion of "chorizo" in this paella, although one
    > sometimes sees it in Spain, is not an encouraging sign.
    >

    I think you're forgetting paella varies by region and cook.
    Chorizo is an acceptable addition... and it was the brides
    decision. The bride is a better than average cook herself,
    so if she wants chroizo - she can have chorizo in the
    paella. She knows what she's doing.

    I was asking about what wine to serve with it.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  12. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On 14 Mar 2004 00:44:54 -0800, [email protected]
    (Christopher Green) wrote:

    > There are nice Spanish sparkling wines you could serve:
    > Freixenet is a widely-distributed brand, and a couple
    > cases of their Carta Nevada or even Cordon Negro won't
    > break the bank.

    Great idea! I like Freixenet Cordon Negro (cava is an
    excellent alternative to champagne) and had completely
    forgotten about it up to now.

    Freixenet Carta Nevada isn't widely distributed here, so
    I'll look for it specifically and do a taste comparison.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  13. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (WardNA) wrote:

    > >It would be a great show for the guests if the caterer
    > >has the equipment and can pull it off.
    >
    > It would be very unlikely for a U.S.-based wedding caterer
    > to do anything more than make something like jambalaya and
    > transfer it to a steam table for serving. The inclusion of
    > "chorizo" in this paella, although one sometimes sees it
    > in Spain, is not an encouraging sign.
    >
    > There are too few Spanish restaurants in the U.S. that
    > make an acceptable paella for me to believe there are many
    > professional caterers with the staff, tools, and insight
    > to make it for 100, especially when the market makes so
    > few demands for quality.
    >
    > Neil

    I have to agree...

    Chorizo is the _last_ thing I'd add to Paella. :p To me,
    it'd totally overwhelm the delicate flavor of the shellfish.

    K

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  14. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 14 Mar 2004 16:02:37 GMT, [email protected] (WardNA)
    > wrote:
    >
    > > >It would be a great show for the guests if the caterer
    > > >has the equipment and can pull it off.
    > >
    > > It would be very unlikely for a U.S.-based wedding
    > > caterer to do anything more than make something like
    > > jambalaya and transfer it to a steam table for serving.
    >
    > Personally, if it turns out looking like a saffron
    > Jambalaya (no tomatoes) - that will be fine with me. My
    > requirement is for it to taste good. I'm not expecting the
    > "look" of Spain, just a taste or two.
    >
    > > The inclusion of "chorizo" in this paella, although one
    > > sometimes sees it in Spain, is not an encouraging sign.
    > >
    >
    > I think you're forgetting paella varies by region and
    > cook. Chorizo is an acceptable addition... and it was the
    > brides decision. The bride is a better than average cook
    > herself, so if she wants chroizo - she can have chorizo in
    > the paella. She knows what she's doing.
    >
    > I was asking about what wine to serve with it.
    >
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments

    So what have you decided? ;-)

    I've seen several ideas tossed your way.

    Just curious......

    K.

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  15. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <KatraMungBean-
    [email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Chorizo is the _last_ thing I'd add to Paella. :p To me,
    > it'd totally overwhelm the delicate flavor of the
    > shellfish.
    >
    >
    Didn't we just have a similar discussion as to whether or
    not mint belonged in lasagna? IMO, those who are cooking and
    eating it get to decide how to make it. Cooking is supposed
    to be experimental, and about personalizing it to your own
    (and your family's) tastes.

    Personally, I think mint in lasagna is strange; however, I'd
    never question you putting it in your lasagna if that's how
    you like it.

    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  16. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:20:36 -0600, Katra
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > So what have you decided? ;-)
    >
    > I've seen several ideas tossed your way.
    >

    I told her all about Freixenet today (thanks to
    Christopher). I like it because it's got the fine bubbles of
    more expensive sparkling wines (and I like the taste too),
    so it's a good choice for wedding receptions when people are
    trying not to match our national debt. It also sounds like
    the Carta Nevada will be more to her taste, Katra... it's
    sweeter, but not as sweet as Spumante.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  17. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Donna Rose <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <KatraMungBean-
    > [email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > > Chorizo is the _last_ thing I'd add to Paella. :p To
    > > me, it'd totally overwhelm the delicate flavor of the
    > > shellfish.
    > >
    > >
    > Didn't we just have a similar discussion as to whether or
    > not mint belonged in lasagna? IMO, those who are cooking
    > and eating it get to decide how to make it. Cooking is
    > supposed to be experimental, and about personalizing it to
    > your own (and your family's) tastes.
    >
    > Personally, I think mint in lasagna is strange; however,
    > I'd never question you putting it in your lasagna if
    > that's how you like it.

    Point and score. ;-)

    K.

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  18. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:20:36 -0600, Katra
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > So what have you decided? ;-)
    > >
    > > I've seen several ideas tossed your way.
    > >
    >
    > I told her all about Freixenet today (thanks to
    > Christopher). I like it because it's got the fine bubbles
    > of more expensive sparkling wines (and I like the taste
    > too), so it's a good choice for wedding receptions when
    > people are trying not to match our national debt. It also
    > sounds like the Carta Nevada will be more to her taste,
    > Katra... it's sweeter, but not as sweet as Spumante.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments

    I'll have to look for Carta Nevada..... I'm always game to
    try new sparkling wines, especially ones that are reasonbly
    priced. :)

    Best of luck with the reception! Those things are always
    quite a challenge.

    K.

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  19. "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Marques de Caceres (Spanish) makes a really nice white
    > for about $5 - I think it would be a better fit than a
    > gewurztraminer and certainly less expensive than a
    > decent gewurztraminer. They also make a very nice red at
    > about the same price - not exactly light but not too
    > heavy either.

    I like that one too.

    In the Paella class I took last week from a local
    recreational/professional school, they served the following:

    Bodega Montecillo Rioja, white: pleasant, smooth, slightly
    sweet, full bodied, clean finish with very slight tannins.
    Spanish whites aren't all that common but I found this
    quite enjoyable. I'd suggest this authentic wine rather
    than a gewurz.

    Bodega Montecillo Riojo, red: nice spice, dependable

    There were a couple others (including a Ribera del Duero)
    but I wasn't too busy cooking to take detailed notes.
     
  20. [email protected] (Christopher Green) writes:

    > There are nice Spanish sparkling wines you could serve:
    > Freixenet is a widely-distributed brand, and a couple
    > cases of their Carta Nevada or even Cordon Negro won't
    > break the bank.

    IMHO Freixenet used to be good when they first popped on to
    the market, but then they put their money into advertising
    and increased the price of the wine; the quality isn't as
    good as it used to be.

    I prefer the following; they're excellent values in
    sparklers: Segura Viudas, and Trocadero.
     
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