Pain below the ribcage

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Amarcus, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. Amarcus

    Amarcus Guest

    Hi, I'm new here. I have not been a big fan of sports, indeed I've been a lazy potato couch all my
    life... until recently. What happened recently is I started suffering from depression, and from the
    advice of some friends (scientists) and from what I've read on the net and the medline, I discovered
    that physical exercise has great anti-depressant effects. It boosts up the feel-good chemicals in
    our body (endorphins, phenylethylamines...etc). I've taken up jogging (25-30 min each day) and been
    doing it for about 10 days now. I feel pretty much better and my outlook on life has improved. But
    that's a bit beside the point, for what I want to ask is this: When I am running, within like 15
    minutes (when I start feeling tired), I start having an internal pain on my right side just below
    the ribcage. That pain goes away the minute I stop running. What is it? I think it's not the stomach
    (I believe the stomach's on the left; but then again I'm not that good in anatomy). And does anyone
    know how to get rid of that pain? I want to go on jogging but that pain really annoys. Thanks.
     
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  2. Stephen

    Stephen Guest

    Maybe it's a cramp? Or maybe your pushing yourself to hard?

    "amarcus" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I'm new here. I have not been a big fan of sports, indeed I've been a
    lazy
    > potato couch all my life... until recently. What happened recently is I
    started
    > suffering from depression, and from the advice of some friends
    (scientists) and
    > from what I've read on the net and the medline, I discovered that physical exercise has great
    > anti-depressant effects. It boosts up the feel-good chemicals in our body (endorphins,
    > phenylethylamines...etc). I've taken up jogging (25-30 min each day) and been doing it for about
    > 10 days now. I
    feel
    > pretty much better and my outlook on life has improved. But that's a bit beside the point, for
    > what I want to ask is this: When I
    am
    > running, within like 15 minutes (when I start feeling tired), I start
    having an
    > internal pain on my right side just below the ribcage. That pain goes away
    the
    > minute I stop running. What is it? I think it's not the stomach (I believe
    the
    > stomach's on the left; but then again I'm not that good in anatomy). And
    does
    > anyone know how to get rid of that pain? I want to go on jogging but that
    pain
    > really annoys. Thanks.
     
  3. Jake Lee

    Jake Lee Guest

    Hey,

    Congrats on the newfound running activity. I've been a life-long sufferer of varying degrees of
    depression and have seemingly managed to beat it now that I've been running for roughly 7 months
    straight now, and no desire whatsoever to stop anytime soon!

    ....just thought I'd share...

    Anyway, as for you abdominal pain, I suggest you give this article a read, and see if it looks to
    match what you describe (it seems to)

    http://www.makeithappen.com/wis/readings/sidest.html

    "amarcus" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I'm new here. I have not been a big fan of sports, indeed I've been a
    lazy
    > potato couch all my life... until recently. What happened recently is I
    started
    > suffering from depression, and from the advice of some friends
    (scientists) and
    > from what I've read on the net and the medline, I discovered that physical exercise has great
    > anti-depressant effects. It boosts up the feel-good chemicals in our body (endorphins,
    > phenylethylamines...etc). I've taken up jogging (25-30 min each day) and been doing it for about
    > 10 days now. I
    feel
    > pretty much better and my outlook on life has improved. But that's a bit beside the point, for
    > what I want to ask is this: When I
    am
    > running, within like 15 minutes (when I start feeling tired), I start
    having an
    > internal pain on my right side just below the ribcage. That pain goes away
    the
    > minute I stop running. What is it? I think it's not the stomach (I believe
    the
    > stomach's on the left; but then again I'm not that good in anatomy). And
    does
    > anyone know how to get rid of that pain? I want to go on jogging but that
    pain
    > really annoys. Thanks.
    >

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  4. Urban Bettag

    Urban Bettag Guest

    > But that's a bit beside the point, for what I want to ask is this: When I
    am
    > running, within like 15 minutes (when I start feeling tired), I start
    having an
    > internal pain on my right side just below the ribcage. That pain goes away
    the
    > minute I stop running. What is it? I think it's not the stomach (I believe
    the
    > stomach's on the left; but then again I'm not that good in anatomy). And
    does
    > anyone know how to get rid of that pain? I want to go on jogging but that
    pain
    > really annoys. Thanks.

    I had the same problem recently. This phenomenon is called "Runner's stitch". It can be caused by
    multiple factors and often ends up in a spasm of the diaphragm.

    Make sure you are hydrated properly and do not have big meal before your run. When you start
    running, start slowly and not with full speed. Focus on the belly breathing. Exhale when the left
    foot strikes the ground.
     
  5. Amh

    Amh Guest

    On 7 Apr 2003 19:04:58 GMT, [email protected] (amarcus) wrote:

    >Hi, I'm new here. I have not been a big fan of sports, indeed I've been a lazy potato couch all my
    >life... until recently. What happened recently is I started suffering from depression, and from the
    >advice of some friends (scientists) and from what I've read on the net and the medline, I
    >discovered that physical exercise has great anti-depressant effects. It boosts up the feel-good
    >chemicals in our body (endorphins, phenylethylamines...etc). I've taken up jogging (25-30 min each
    >day) and been doing it for about 10 days now. I feel pretty much better and my outlook on life has
    >improved. But that's a bit beside the point, for what I want to ask is this: When I am running,
    >within like 15 minutes (when I start feeling tired), I start having an internal pain on my right
    >side just below the ribcage. That pain goes away the minute I stop running. What is it? I think
    >it's not the stomach (I believe the stomach's on the left; but then again I'm not that good in
    >anatomy). And does anyone know how to get rid of that pain? I want to go on jogging but that pain
    >really annoys. Thanks.
    >
    I guess side stitches. Until you get in shape you'll get these stabbing pains because of your
    breathing.

    When running be sure to breath deeply with your diaphram (stomach muscles). Inhale deeply and blow
    out deeply. Side stitches usually indicate that you are not getting enough oxygen to your muscles.
    They will subside as you get into shape. Right not your endurance is in better shape than your
    lungs. Slow down a bit until your lungs catch up.

    The fact that you are able to run for up to 30 minutes is excellent progress. It can take people
    weeks just to be able to run for 5 minutes. Keep at it your friends are right.

    Andy
     
  6. Amarcus

    Amarcus Guest

    > From: [email protected] (amh) I guess side stitches. Until you get in shape you'll get these stabbing
    > pains because of your breathing. When running be sure to breath deeply with your diaphram
    > (stomach muscles). Inhale deeply and blow out deeply. Side stitches usually indicate that you
    > are not getting enough oxygen to your muscles. They will subside as you get into shape. Right
    > not your endurance is in better shape than your lungs. Slow down a bit until your lungs catch
    > up. The fact that you are able to run for up to 30 minutes is excellent progress. It can take
    > people weeks just to be able to run for 5 minutes. Keep at it your friends are right.

    Thanks Andy and all you guys for replying. Yes after I've read the article suggested and the
    responses I think it is indeed what is called side stitches I'm experiencing. I will take your
    suggestions and put them into practice, I hope that will be the end of that disturbing pain. Thanks
    for all the ecouragements. Running/jogging is a great activity I will go on with it. I prefer to go
    run outdoors than on a treadmill in the gym. It's nicer and cheaper too imo (Although sometimes it
    gets really cold out here).
     
  7. Ed Prochak

    Ed Prochak Guest

    amarcus wrote:
    >> From: [email protected] (amh)
    []
    >>The fact that you are able to run for up to 30 minutes is excellent progress. It can take people
    >>weeks just to be able to run for 5 minutes. Keep at it your friends are right.
    >
    >
    > Thanks Andy and all you guys for replying. Yes after I've read the article suggested and the
    > responses I think it is indeed what is called side stitches I'm experiencing. I will take your
    > suggestions and put them into practice, I hope that will be the end of that disturbing pain.
    > Thanks for all the ecouragements. Running/jogging is a great activity I will go on with it. I
    > prefer to go run outdoors than on a treadmill in the gym. It's nicer and cheaper too imo (Although
    > sometimes it gets really cold out here).

    Welcome to the group and good job in getting started running!

    You'll eventually adjust to the weather. Dress in layers of clothes to handle colder temperatures.
    And being properly hydrated is also very important.

    Enjoy the run.

    --
    Ed Prochak running: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/ family:
    http://web.magicinterface.com/~collins
    --
    "Two roads diverged in a wood and I I took the one less travelled by and that has made all the
    difference." robert frost
     
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