pain under my scrotum after riding one hour

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by glucany, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. glucany

    glucany New Member

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    Hi everybody, I am an almost absolute beginner who fell in love with the sport 9 months ago. I go out as often as I can and my conditioning improves I have been able to ride longer and more intensely. With longer and more intense rides I have been developing three distinct pains: pressure under scrotum, lower back and knees.

    While the latter problems are being solved with the help of a good professional fitter who's not trying to sell me a new frame, the pressure under my scrotum is getting to be a problem.

    It starts around one hour into the ride and I can deal with it by getting up on the pedals for 10 seconds every 5 minutes. This gets me through the second hour. After that it gets worst and worst: today I had to stop after three hours of riding with my new group and rest for 15-20minutes. The rest ride after that was hell anyway.

    I have an old saddle without the "slit" in the middle (I can't tell what make and model it is) so I guess I could try a new one: but since the problem comes up after an hour, how can I make sure a new saddle I'll try is good?

    Are there shorts with "superpad" which could help me?

    Or is this a posture problem? The bike fitter I used made me change my posture: I now lean forward towards the handle with my butt sticking out. This has helped lowering my back pain considerably.

    Thanks a lot.

    Luca
     
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  2. ambal

    ambal Active Member

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    Try a dif saddle also make sure your knicks have a high quality chamois.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Check your position on the bike and your saddle's position. If either of those is off, you can get what you're experiencing. If everything is copasetic with position, then it might time to look at a new saddle. The chamois isn't going to keep your nutsack pain away. In fact, if the chamois has too much padding, it causes numbness and pain. You should post a pic of your saddle as seen from the side, at the height of the saddle.
     
  4. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    A good, well fitting, pair of cycling shorts are a must have item. As much as people put importance on saving 100 grams on the latest carbon frame - if you have "issues" down there it doesn't matter what you ride... Did you have this issue before your bike fit? Bike fitters have been known to get things wrong from time to time. Have a chat with your bike fitter - they might allow you to try out a few saddles. As far as your hairy plums go - make sure you pull 'em up and out of the way before you ride and if needs be try different saddle positions. Adjust the tilt slightly and see how it feels.
     
  5. glucany

    glucany New Member

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    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    Hi alienator, thanks for your help. here are my bike's pics. I just had it fitted. Bike is a 2006 fuji team pro, size 56cm. I am 5'9" with 81-82cm inseam.

    As per the position, I am not sure: bike fitter (who's also a trainer) told me to ride in a flatter position, leaning more on the bar for control and with my hips/butt sticking out.

    The shorts I ride are Pearl Izumi Select series: they fit comfortably and the chamois is not very thick but keeps its shape.

    Thanks again for any insight.
     
  6. glucany

    glucany New Member

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    Hi Swampy,

    thank you for your help.

    My short are rather good I think, as I say above.

    I am not sure if I had the same issue before the fitting; cycling and all its small physical nuisances is a new experience to me and I have a high pain threshold. I got worst after the fitting 3 weeks ago, but then again I also have been riding intensely due to the awesome weather we had. I definitely need to talk to my fitter.

    Question: do you wear underwear under the short? Cause I do and I am not sure if it is correct.

    Thanks again.
     
  7. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    Judging by the height of your saddle and your seat post you should have no problem making a few adjustments to accommodate fitting. Your fit issue is in your reach and you can make a few things different short of buying a new frame.

    Look into getting a seat post with out any set back. This will allow to adjust your saddle closer to your bars.

    Replace your stem with a shorter stem. This will allow you to move the bars in closer.

    Narrower bars could also make a big difference in reach issues.

    Cycling shorts are designed to be worn without undershorts.
     
  8. glucany

    glucany New Member

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    Hi Davereo, thanks for your suggestions.

    My fitter told me that my previous problems (lower back pain) was a consequence of being seated too close to the bar, therefore pushed the seat back and changed my old stem (a shorter one) with this one (90mm) - he told me that I had to "open up". He warned me of possible temporarily issue with the soft tissues down under, but he also told me that I will eventually get over them.

    What about rising the bar (in my case would mean changing the fork)? It does give me some relief when I ride with my hands on the flat part of the bar - especially uphill.

    Thanks again,

    Luca
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. Even though I am also 5'9" tall, we undoubtedly have different proportions AND different levels of flexibility ...

    Nonetheless, in addition to what your fitter has suggested to you, you may want to consider using MY setup as an alternate starting point with the hope that the right fit for you will eventually be found sooner-rather-than-later ...

    • the top of my saddle is only 28.25" above the center of the BB spindle (175mm cranks) ...

    Here's an old picture of one of my old bikes ... 52cm (c-c) ... 54.5cm top tube ... 120mm stem ...

    [​IMG]
    BTW. With YOUR current setup, I would rotate the handlebars so that the Drops are closer to horizontal, unwrap your handlebars & remount the brake levers so that they are up-and-back & the name plate is almost horizontal, rewrap the bars. This will shorten the effective reach of the brake levers & Drops of your handlebars.
     
  10. AlanG

    AlanG Member

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    I am not at all qualified to tell you what to do or contradict your bike fitter. But looking at your setup, nothing looks too extreme to me. (Judging without you on it would be pretty hard for anyone.) Perhaps your seat could be angled down very slightly but I have no idea if this would give you enough relief or if you would be sliding forward. (I have tilted mine down a little bit in front over time and adapted well to it.) Do you feel any reduction in pain when you move to a more upright position and take some pressure off the inflamed area? In other words do you think that the process of leaning forward causes the issue or is it a problem from riding in general?

    I can't tell you that a different saddle would solve your problem, but I think the Selle SMP saddle designs look interesting... although I don't have one. Perhaps it is the right fit for you body as I think it would minimize the contact where it hurts you. Here is one of their more extreme cutouts.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Never wear underwear under the shorts. Clean shorts and clean skin are the way to go.

    Some people like using stuff like chamois cream but I can't stand the stuff. Back in the day when real chamois leather was used it was a must, now with synthetic chamois it's personal preference. If I wanted my nutsack greased and pain induced down there I'd go seek out Mistress Cruella and get the job done right...

    Stand behind the bike and double check that your saddle is straight. For some reason I keep looking at the overhead pic of the saddle and can't help thinking it's pointing off to the right just a tad. Looking at the same pic - do you have issues with your right foot wanting to rotate out (or when you're on the bike your heel wants to rotate inwards)?

    SMP saddles are a bit hit and miss. I went through a week of purgatory on mine and now I quite like it. Not as comfy as the Specialized Toupe when riding in the hills (ie sitting up more) but it's more comfortable when in the drops.
     
  12. ambal

    ambal Active Member

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    The over head shot def shows the seat point right a little. No underwear and a good quality chamois is a must, despite what others say.
     
  13. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    The previous posters all have good suggestions and I will not rehash them.

    Here are other items to consider:

    Weight: the heavier your are, the more pressure you will be putting on the saddle. Even small changes in weight can be noticeable. I can tell the difference when I am wearing a backpack while commuting or carrying a few extra bottles in my jersey. Minimize the weight you seat needs to carry.

    Time / effort: The longer in the saddle the more time your tissues have to get ischemic or irritated. The harder you press on the pedals, the less weight is supported by the saddle. I have found that my posterior suffers more during relatively low efforts, like charitiy rides when I wait for friends and end up taking 30% longer to do a particular distance. Anyway, as you get to be a stronger - faster cyclist you may find that you are making your legs carry more of the weight.

    Saddles: there are good and bad. I sometimes alternate between saddles to let irritated areas have a break. Some shops around here let you bring back a seat if you find it does not work for you.

    Shorts: You can double up on the shorts for extra padding. Although more padding is not always better. My favorite pair are triathlon shorts which have a very thin, insignificant pad.

    Creams: Can help prevent or manage existing issues. I have tried a variety - the most effective for me seem to be petroleum jelly based: bag balm, aquaphor, vaseline and the most protective is desitin (but it turns the crotch of your shorts white).

    Hygene: Clean and disinfect. I wash up with isopropyl after a ride, this can sting but seems to help with preventing sores.
     
  14. glucany

    glucany New Member

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    Hi everybody,

    I applied some of your suggestions, the ones I could manage immediately - in particular:

    - changed my saddle to a Specialized Romin (friend of mine lent it to me for few days) - it has a middle slit;
    - Wore my shorts without underwear;
    - moved the seat 5-7mm forward, pointing slightly down;
    - made sure the seat was pointing straight.

    Then I went out riding making sure I was "feeling" my seat at all times. In particular I realized that by leaning forward on the handle bar as my fitter told me AND slightly arching my back I would end up sitting on my "ass" bones. And, more importantly, my nut sack felt unengaged and sort of free.

    I rode past the one hour mark (the mark when the pressure pain started showing) almost with no bother.

    I know it's early to say and today ride may mean nothing; I also know I probably messed up the fit I had on and it most probably have consequences somewhere else. But you can't even imagine how I am today! Wednesday I will go for an evening ride - around 3 hours - and we shall see; after that I will see the fitter on Friday for eventual adjustments!

    In the mean time I wanted to thank all of you who spent time helping me, I really appreciate it.

    I will keep you posted.
     
  15. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Uhm, your saddle should be placed in a position that optimizes your leg position with respect to the pedal. Saddle position should not be used to change reach. That's why we have different length stems. If you can't get the proper reach ( because you're "too close to the bar") then you need a new stem that's longer, or you need a bike with a longer top tube. Lastly, your back should be flat, not arched. If by arching you meant you pulled your lower back in, then that's ok.
     
  16. chuckdee

    chuckdee New Member

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    This.
     
  17. Flyingblind9

    Flyingblind9 New Member

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    Pain there can be alleviated in most cases as stated with many responses with good cycling shorts, and you might want to try pitching the seat just slightly nose-down so that the most of the weight goes to your rear, rather than in-between. I ride a Selle Italia Max Gel and the center cutout really helps minimize where contact points press and cause discomfort. I'm constantly adjusting my saddle depending if my riding style changes a little bit to maintain a comfortable ride. BTW nice pics of the bike. looks like a fun machine!
     
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