Painting Carbon Fiber



D

D. Ualp

Guest
Hey everyone,

I'm in the market for a carbon fiber fork for my road bike but I want to
get the fork custom painted. I have found a few different painting
outfits that say they have experience with painting carbon but in every
case it sounds like (which would make sense I suppose) that one of the
phases actually involves sanding the fork. I don't know if this
immediately rings alarms with anyone else besides me?

So I'm in the process right now of trying to find a reputable fork
manufacturer that would be willing to sell me a fork that hasn't gone
through the final clear-coating phase, etc. and is in a ready-to-paint
state, thus avoiding the need to have it sanded. Anyone have ideas as
to manufacturers, paint shops, or how I should go about doing this? Thanks,

D. Ualp
 
R

RonSonic

Guest
On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 00:34:48 -0700, "D. Ualp"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Hey everyone,
>
>I'm in the market for a carbon fiber fork for my road bike but I want to
>get the fork custom painted. I have found a few different painting
>outfits that say they have experience with painting carbon but in every
>case it sounds like (which would make sense I suppose) that one of the
>phases actually involves sanding the fork. I don't know if this
>immediately rings alarms with anyone else besides me?


I wouldn't be that concerned. The only sanding needed would be to knock the
glaze off so the paint will have some adhesion. They'll be using a very fine
grit paper that won't realistically break through or create stress risers.

>So I'm in the process right now of trying to find a reputable fork
>manufacturer that would be willing to sell me a fork that hasn't gone
>through the final clear-coating phase, etc. and is in a ready-to-paint
>state, thus avoiding the need to have it sanded.


That would leave less material protecting the, let's call it the working part of
the composite and your paint shop will still want to sand it. That is what's
done to produce a clean surface with some tooth. The important thing is that it
be a shop that understands just what a critical weight-bearing component this is
and uses suitable handling.

I can imagine an auto body guy saying "oops" when he drops and scars the thing
and filling the gash with bondo. That'd be scary.

Ron
 
R

Russell Seaton

Guest
"D. Ualp" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Hey everyone,
>
> I'm in the market for a carbon fiber fork for my road bike but I want to
> get the fork custom painted. I have found a few different painting
> outfits that say they have experience with painting carbon but in every
> case it sounds like (which would make sense I suppose) that one of the
> phases actually involves sanding the fork. I don't know if this
> immediately rings alarms with anyone else besides me?
>
> So I'm in the process right now of trying to find a reputable fork
> manufacturer that would be willing to sell me a fork that hasn't gone
> through the final clear-coating phase, etc. and is in a ready-to-paint
> state, thus avoiding the need to have it sanded. Anyone have ideas as
> to manufacturers, paint shops, or how I should go about doing this? Thanks,


Craig Calfee's website has an option of painting a fork you send him
when you buy a frame from him. I have seen carbon Wound Up forks from
Co-Motion painted to match the frame. I would contact one of these
frame makers, or others I am sure, and ask what the charge would be to
order just a custom painted fork through them.