Pair of SpeedMachines spotted in Central IL

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Barry S., Jun 17, 2003.

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  1. Barry S.

    Barry S. Guest

    Last weekend there was a 30-something couple from Terra Haute, IN riding a pair of SpeedMachines on
    our local C-U Across the Prairie tour. The bikes looked pretty sleek; but I could tell that they
    were twitchy at low speeds. They weren't riding very fast at all - we easily overtook the
    SpeedMachines on our upright road bikes, and we were running 14 mph average. Apparently one of the
    SpeedMachine riders dropped his chain, locked up a wheel and dumped it. He said this was the 2nd
    time in a month that this had happened. I didn't get a chance to examine the bike; but that's not
    something you expect to happen on a $3,000+ bike.

    I've test ridden a SpeedMachine. Very cushy, feels nice; but isn't very fast. The only local owner
    of a SpeedMachine (AFAIK) agrees with me on this. He calls his bike the "SlowMachine" :) I don't
    want to dump on 'em too much; but I can't say that these SpeedMachines are impressing me much from
    what I've heard and experienced. They sure do look great, though.

    Barry
     
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  2. Ben Fox

    Ben Fox Guest

    Any bike can throw the chain and lock up the rear wheel, if the derailluer is out of adjustment. It
    is a simple thing to correct and should have been done after the first time. Why would someone
    continue to ride a bike that has this dangereous problem? Ben Fox "Barry S." <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Last weekend there was a 30-something couple from Terra Haute, IN riding a pair of SpeedMachines
    > on our local C-U Across the Prairie tour. The bikes looked pretty sleek; but I could tell that
    > they were twitchy at low
    speeds.
    > They weren't riding very fast at all - we easily overtook the
    SpeedMachines
    > on our upright road bikes, and we were running 14 mph average. Apparently one of the SpeedMachine
    > riders dropped his chain, locked up a wheel and dumped it. He said this was the 2nd time in a
    > month that this had
    happened.
    > I didn't get a chance to examine the bike; but that's not something you expect to happen on a
    > $3,000+ bike.
    >
    > I've test ridden a SpeedMachine. Very cushy, feels nice; but isn't very fast. The only local owner
    > of a SpeedMachine (AFAIK) agrees with me on this. He calls his bike the "SlowMachine" :) I don't
    > want to dump on
    'em
    > too much; but I can't say that these SpeedMachines are impressing me much from what I've heard and
    > experienced. They sure do look great, though.
    >
    > Barry
     
  3. I've had mine for two and a bit years and coming up 11,000 km and have had no chain troubles at all.
    As my grate frend Parry once said, this smacks of managerial incompetence...

    As to speed, it averaged about 23 mph for two hours around Castle Combe in 2001 with the "race"
    tailbox; last Sunday Big Iain averaged about 21 on his (no tailbox, Rohloff transmission) for the
    same time.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  4. Rod Dabe

    Rod Dabe Guest

    "Ben Fox" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Why would someone continue to ride a bike that has this dangereous problem?

    Maybe someone with more money than sense.

    Rod Dabe
     
  5. Pierre

    Pierre Guest

    "Barry S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Last weekend there was a 30-something couple from Terra Haute, IN riding a pair of SpeedMachines
    > on our local C-U Across the Prairie tour. The bikes looked pretty sleek; but I could tell that
    > they were twitchy at low speeds. They weren't riding very fast at all - we easily overtook the
    > SpeedMachines on our upright road bikes, and we were running 14 mph average. Apparently one of the
    > SpeedMachine riders dropped his chain, locked up a wheel and dumped it. He said this was the 2nd
    > time in a month that this had happened. I didn't get a chance to examine the bike; but that's not
    > something you expect to happen on a $3,000+ bike.
    >
    > I've test ridden a SpeedMachine. Very cushy, feels nice; but isn't very fast. The only local owner
    > of a SpeedMachine (AFAIK) agrees with me on this. He calls his bike the "SlowMachine" :) I don't
    > want to dump on 'em too much; but I can't say that these SpeedMachines are impressing me much from
    > what I've heard and experienced. They sure do look great, though.
    >
    > Barry

    I certainly would not categorize the Speedmachine as a "Slowmachine". I admit that the namesake
    alone may set up loftly expectations but, as with every other bike; your performance may vary
    depending on the motor. IMO the only short coming it does have is it's gravitational impairment.
    Starting just under 40lbs and then adding real world riding essentials places the bike in the low
    40-something lbs. range. I suppose that's the price you pay when you have dual suspension and disc
    brakes. These are features that are not usually found together on your typical "go fast" bent. I
    believe HPV's intent with the Speedmachine's offering wasn't to compete with lowracer crowd
    (Jester, Baron, M-5 etc..). I see the Speedmachine more as a refined light-tourer with above
    average speed potential, especially on down-hills.

    Pierre
     
  6. bentcruiser

    bentcruiser New Member

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    I think the speed of this particular instance was dictated by the riders, not the Speedmachine. These bikes have a good reputation.

    I would imagine the slowness you feel is because you are used to riding a lighter bike. Here's an example: I ride a Canto. It is way faster and lighter than my older BikeE. I can average speeds untenable on my BikeE. But to someone riding a Baron or some light bike, the Canto is slow.

    The derailleur, IMHO, is a matter of either poor shifting or poor adjustment. One can throw a chain like that by shifting from 1-1 to 3-1 (unacceptable gear to use). Or the derailleur is in bad need of adjustment.
     
  7. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    While motorcycle camping in Tennessee last weekend, I rode the Cherohala Skyway (on the motorcycle)
    There was an organized ride of 116 miles in the mountains.

    I saw one bent, I believe a V**2 . Anyone we know here.

    If you finished that ride, my hat's off to you.

    --
    Miles of Smiles,

    Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone

    www.gate.net/~teblum
     
  8. Thank You Pierre and Dave L. for great comments A good bike put together and adjusted poorly or
    poorly maintained is a piece of shit no matter what the pricetag. What does it mean when Dave
    Larrington on his 40 lb SpeedMachine passes me on on grammed down 22lb AERO. It means he is a better
    athlete. So should I go home and drill more holes it the seat, get a 1200 gr. wheelset? or lose
    20lbs and train for speed? Duh....Get the drill and buy a lighter wheelset of course.

    --
    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "Pierre" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Barry S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Last weekend there was a 30-something couple from Terra Haute, IN riding
    a
    > > pair of SpeedMachines on our local C-U Across the Prairie tour. The
    bikes
    > > looked pretty sleek; but I could tell that they were twitchy at low
    speeds.
    > > They weren't riding very fast at all - we easily overtook the
    SpeedMachines
    > > on our upright road bikes, and we were running 14 mph average.
    Apparently
    > > one of the SpeedMachine riders dropped his chain, locked up a wheel and dumped it. He said this
    > > was the 2nd time in a month that this had
    happened.
    > > I didn't get a chance to examine the bike; but that's not something you expect to happen on a
    > > $3,000+ bike.
    > >
    > > I've test ridden a SpeedMachine. Very cushy, feels nice; but isn't very fast. The only local
    > > owner of a SpeedMachine (AFAIK) agrees with me on this. He calls his bike the "SlowMachine" :)
    > > I don't want to dump on
    'em
    > > too much; but I can't say that these SpeedMachines are impressing me
    much
    > > from what I've heard and experienced. They sure do look great, though.
    > >
    > > Barry
    >
    > I certainly would not categorize the Speedmachine as a "Slowmachine". I admit that the namesake
    > alone may set up loftly expectations but, as with every other bike; your performance may vary
    > depending on the motor. IMO the only short coming it does have is it's gravitational impairment.
    > Starting just under 40lbs and then adding real world riding essentials places the bike in the
    > low 40-something lbs. range. I suppose that's the price you pay when you have dual suspension
    > and disc brakes. These are features that are not usually found together on your typical "go
    > fast" bent. I believe HPV's intent with the Speedmachine's offering wasn't to compete with
    > lowracer crowd (Jester, Baron, M-5 etc..). I see the Speedmachine more as a refined light-tourer
    > with above average speed potential, especially on down-hills.
    >
    > Pierre
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Pierre wrote:
    >
    > I certainly would not categorize the Speedmachine as a "Slowmachine". I admit that the namesake
    > alone may set up loftly expectations but, as with every other bike; your performance may vary
    > depending on the motor. IMO the only short coming it does have is it's gravitational impairment.
    > Starting just under 40lbs and then adding real world riding essentials places the bike in the
    > low 40-something lbs. range. I suppose that's the price you pay when you have dual suspension
    > and disc brakes. These are features that are not usually found together on your typical "go
    > fast" bent. I believe HPV's intent with the Speedmachine's offering wasn't to compete with
    > lowracer crowd (Jester, Baron, M-5 etc..). I see the Speedmachine more as a refined light-tourer
    > with above average speed potential, especially on down-hills.

    For what it is worth, the "SlowMachine" owner's primary bike is an Easy Racers GRR with a Super
    Zzipper and a bodysock.

    Tom Sherman - Test road the "SlowMachine" a couple of weeks ago Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  10. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    bentcruiser wrote:
    > ... The derailleur, IMHO, is a matter of either poor shifting or poor adjustment. One can throw a
    > chain like that by shifting from 1-1 to 3-1 (unacceptable gear to use)....

    Not on a bike or trike with a step-up jackshaft. :)

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities Red Sunset and Blue Dragonflyer :)
     
  11. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    "Barry S." wrote:
    > ... I've test ridden a SpeedMachine. Very cushy, feels nice; but isn't very fast. The only local
    > owner of a SpeedMachine (AFAIK) agrees with me on this. He calls his bike the "SlowMachine" :) I
    > don't want to dump on 'em too much; but I can't say that these SpeedMachines are impressing me
    > much from what I've heard and experienced. They sure do look great, though.

    When I rode the "SlowMachine" a couple of weeks ago, a couple of things struck me. The bike seemed
    huge compared to my Sunset and the complex rear suspension was inferior in terms of pedaling induced
    pogo and shock absorption to the simple set-up on my Dragonflyer.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities Red Sunset and Blue Dragonflyer :)
     
  12. Pierre

    Pierre Guest

    Tom Sherman <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Pierre wrote:
    > >
    > > I certainly would not categorize the Speedmachine as a "Slowmachine". I admit that the
    > > namesake alone may set up loftly expectations but, as with every other bike; your performance
    > > may vary depending on the motor. IMO the only short coming it does have is it's gravitational
    > > impairment. Starting just under 40lbs and then adding real world riding essentials places the
    > > bike in the low 40-something lbs. range. I suppose that's the price you pay when you have dual
    > > suspension and disc brakes. These are features that are not usually found together on your
    > > typical "go fast" bent. I believe HPV's intent with the Speedmachine's offering wasn't to
    > > compete with lowracer crowd (Jester, Baron, M-5 etc..). I see the Speedmachine more as a
    > > refined light-tourer with above average speed potential, especially on down-hills.
    >
    > For what it is worth, the "SlowMachine" owner's primary bike is an Easy Racers GRR with a Super
    > Zzipper and a bodysock.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Test road the "SlowMachine" a couple of weeks ago Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    Tom, Also FWIW. If a rider's natural default is to the BB height of a GRR, it stands to
    reason as to why they might be challenged for performance on a Speedmachine. The SM's BB
    height is drastically higher than that of the GRR's. It's been my observation that for most
    riders the higher BB bikes take longer to become acclimated to, especially if they are
    accustome to a lower BB.

    Another observation that MAY apply,(No disrespect intended); Your typical aero-belly can excel
    on a GRR but, would be challenged in the tight cockpit of the SM.

    -Pierre
     
  13. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Pierre wrote:
    >
    > > For what it is worth, the "SlowMachine" owner's primary bike is an Easy Racers GRR with a Super
    > > Zzipper and a bodysock.
    > >
    > > Tom Sherman - Test road the "SlowMachine" a couple of weeks ago Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
    >
    > Tom, Also FWIW. If a rider's natural default is to the BB height of a GRR, it stands to reason
    > as to why they might be challenged for performance on a Speedmachine. The SM's BB height is
    > drastically higher than that of the GRR's. It's been my observation that for most riders the
    > higher BB bikes take longer to become acclimated to, especially if they are accustome to a
    > lower BB.
    >
    > Another observation that MAY apply,(No disrespect intended); Your typical aero-belly can excel
    > on a GRR but, would be challenged in the tight cockpit of the SM.

    The "SlowMachine"'s owner has also ridden a P-38 extensively which has a BB above seat level and a
    very closed hip angle position.

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
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