pairing two bikes to row?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by [email protected], Aug 1, 2005.

  1. Hollo,

    I am planning to attach two bikes in parallel to mount a rowing
    mechanism in the middle, I think it will be more realistic that a
    "standard" row bike; for instance I will be able to turn by padding an
    oar faster than the other.

    In principle the device is simple, one string to pull, another to
    recover, just tying them to the two pedals. But I would like to know
    about similar machines, to get better ideas. Any pointers?

    Alejandro Rivero

    PS: if it works, I will use lateral wheels to center the device in an
    abandoned railway.
     
    Tags:


  2. Does the abandoned railway still have its tracks? You could build some
    sort of rowing locomotive. You could even have carriages with
    passengers. That would be cool.

    A

    PS I volunteer myself as conductor and/or signalman.




    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hollo,
    >
    > I am planning to attach two bikes in parallel to mount a rowing
    > mechanism in the middle, I think it will be more realistic that a
    > "standard" row bike; for instance I will be able to turn by padding an
    > oar faster than the other.
    >
    > In principle the device is simple, one string to pull, another to
    > recover, just tying them to the two pedals. But I would like to know
    > about similar machines, to get better ideas. Any pointers?
    >
    > Alejandro Rivero
    >
    > PS: if it works, I will use lateral wheels to center the device in an
    > abandoned railway.
    >
     
  3. Alistair Potts wrote:
    > Does the abandoned railway still have its tracks? You could build some
    > sort of rowing locomotive. You could even have carriages with
    > passengers. That would be cool.


    Hi Allistar,

    Yep, most of Spanish abandoned railroad has been removed (using biking
    as an excuse for private interests, but that is another history) but
    fortunately there are there extant railways in Castilla, all the three
    over 100 miles. I could even to combine bike and electric bike -with a
    dynamo to load battery- in order to keep speed while resting.

    The only problem is to keep the bike wheels in the track. An standard
    train uses conical wheels, that works because of the weight of the
    train, but it could not work with a light vehicle.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >
    >Alistair Potts wrote:
    >> Does the abandoned railway still have its tracks? You could build some
    >> sort of rowing locomotive. You could even have carriages with
    >> passengers. That would be cool.

    >
    >Hi Allistar,
    >
    >Yep, most of Spanish abandoned railroad has been removed (using biking
    >as an excuse for private interests, but that is another history) but
    >fortunately there are there extant railways in Castilla, all the three
    >over 100 miles. I could even to combine bike and electric bike -with a
    >dynamo to load battery- in order to keep speed while resting.
    >
    >The only problem is to keep the bike wheels in the track. An standard
    >train uses conical wheels, that works because of the weight of the
    >train, but it could not work with a light vehicle.
    >


    I thought trains used a combination of a flange on the inside edge of the
    wheel combined with a conical shape. I didn't think that the weight was
    needed for the conical shape to help, I recall seeing a demo many years
    ago which I think mentioned the larger diameter of the wheel as the
    auto-centering mechanism rather than the weight of the train, but my
    memory may well be faulty. The different effective diameters of the wheels
    would tend to centre the train between the tracks with a fixed axle system
    at least.

    Douglas
     
  5. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Douglas MacFarlane" wrote: (clip) The different effective diameters of the
    wheels would tend to centre the train between the tracks with a fixed axle
    system at least.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    As the train rounds a curve, it tends toward the outside, placing the
    smaller diameter part of the wheel in contact on the inside of the curve,
    and the larger diameter on the outside. This acts as a "differential," to
    let the wheels roll without slipping.
     
  6. Seriously, it would be great to do it on the track. Because then you'd
    have something really unique. Maybe you could find one of those bogies
    that are manually-powered with a sort of see-saw device. That would be a
    good start.



    Leo Lichtman wrote:
    > "Douglas MacFarlane" wrote: (clip) The different effective diameters of the
    > wheels would tend to centre the train between the tracks with a fixed axle
    > system at least.
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > As the train rounds a curve, it tends toward the outside, placing the
    > smaller diameter part of the wheel in contact on the inside of the curve,
    > and the larger diameter on the outside. This acts as a "differential," to
    > let the wheels roll without slipping.
    >
    >
     
  7. Alistair Potts ha escrito:

    > Seriously, it would be great to do it on the track. Because then you'd
    > have something really unique. Maybe you could find one of those bogies
    > that are manually-powered with a sort of see-saw device. That would be a
    > good start.


    Actually, you can do a see-saw bogie by attaching an axis... to the
    pedals between both bikes! Very simple. Then you attach a vertical bar
    to this axis, and ready to pump.

    Alejandro
     
  8. Slugger

    Slugger Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hollo,
    >
    > I am planning to attach two bikes in parallel to mount a rowing
    > mechanism in the middle, I think it will be more realistic that a
    > "standard" row bike; for instance I will be able to turn by padding an
    > oar faster than the other.
    >
    > In principle the device is simple, one string to pull, another to
    > recover, just tying them to the two pedals. But I would like to know
    > about similar machines, to get better ideas. Any pointers?
    >
    > Alejandro Rivero
    >
    > PS: if it works, I will use lateral wheels to center the device in an
    > abandoned railway.
    >

    maybe you could get some ideas from the Sun Quadribent
    http://www.beststuff.com/images/articles/072205a7.jpg
     
  9. Suggest you take a look at www.wekapassrailway.co.nz/jiggers.htm.

    Scroll down to 3 wheel Hand Operated Velocipede. This is the way the
    railways of old did it.

    The fettler powered it used a vertical lever actuating around the
    centre onto a crank. The crank drove through a gear onto the axle. The
    arms and legs are used. A bit like rowing but the arms pulled and the
    legs pushed at the same time.

    In some old Western movies (Blazing Saddles) you might see the pump
    action trolley which was "rowed" standing up using arms and backs
    largely.

    To clear up some misconceptions, tapered wheels are used on trains to
    centralise the wheel /axle set between the rails to reduce flange wear,
    weight is not a factor. In turns, yes, the flanges scrub, this is the
    bane of railway bogie designers.

    It is entirely possible to build what you are after out of bike parts
    plus a lot of ingenuity, Good Luck.
     
  10. Google 'railbike' and you will find plenty to be getting on with.
     
  11. [email protected] ha escrito:

    > Google 'railbike' and you will find plenty to be getting on with.


    Thanks again. I also found the corresponding translations:

    French: velorail
    Spanish: ciclorail (and no bicirail)
    German: Draisinesomething...?
     
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