Panniers

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Asqui, Jun 12, 2003.

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  1. Asqui

    Asqui Guest

    Hello,

    I am looking for a pair of rear panniers that will allow enough space for reasonable weekend tours
    -- I'm thinking 50L should do nicely. I also plan to use one of them for carrying a basic 'puncture
    response kit' and books etc for when I commute to university, so I also need convenient removal and
    off-bike carrying so I can take it off and carry it around when I reach my destination.

    The problem is the 'nice' ones are so expensive!

    Can anyone recommend anything that meets these requirements and compares to (say) the Altura Orkney,
    or am I just going to have to bike the bullet on this one if I want to have something decent?

    Thanks, Dani
     
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  2. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Fri, 13 Jun 2003 02:14:04 +0000, asqui wrote:

    >
    > The problem is the 'nice' ones are so expensive!
    >
    > Can anyone recommend anything that meets these requirements and compares to (say) the Altura
    > Orkney, or am I just going to have to bike the bullet on this one if I want to have
    > something decent?

    I bought a pair of Altura Orkneys recently, for a trip to Scotland. I like them. I also use them for
    commuting - and the quick release mechanism is useful there.

    I then saw that Wiggle have them for 65 pounds a pair. SO if you cna afford that, go to
    www.wiggle.co.uk
     
  3. On Fri, 13 Jun 2003 06:51:49 +0100, "John Hearns" <[email protected]> said:

    > I bought a pair of Altura Orkneys recently, for a trip to Scotland. I like them. I also use them
    > for commuting - and the quick release mechanism is useful there.

    Until they break. I have a pair of Alturas - not sure of the model - could well be Orkney 50s. They
    have a pair of clips that hold them onto the top rail, and I've had two breakages so far - once the
    lever you use to open and close the clip snapped, and once the tapped bit of plastic the adjustment
    screw goes into broke.

    --
    Alan J. Wylie http://www.glaramara.freeserve.co.uk/ "Perfection [in design] is achieved not when
    there is nothing left to add, but rather when there is nothing left to take away." -- Antoine de
    Saint-Exupery
     
  4. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Alan J. Wylie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Until they break. I have a pair of Alturas - not sure of the model - could well be Orkney 50s.
    > They have a pair of clips that hold them onto the top rail, and I've had two breakages so far -
    > once the lever you use to open and close the clip snapped, and once the tapped bit of plastic the
    > adjustment screw goes into broke.

    I abused a pair for six weeks on a tour of India, banging them on & off of the bike, chucking them
    into trains & buses, hauling them in & out of hotels, giving to those most gentle souls -- airport
    baggage handlers -- and providing zero TLC. They survived unscathed.

    T
     
  5. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    asqui wrote:

    > The problem is the 'nice' ones are so expensive!

    Well, the adage goes you get what you pay for...

    > Can anyone recommend anything that meets these requirements and compares to (say) the Altura
    > Orkney, or am I just going to have to bike the bullet on this one if I want to have
    > something decent?

    Even basic ones from Argos etc. are remarkably good considering what you pay. But in terms of
    fittings, longevity, etc. the better ones are, well, *better*. But don't rule out cheap 'n cheerful,
    they'll be up to most jobs even if ease of use may be a little better.

    Also note that down-range models from people like Altura, Carradice etc. can be a fair bit cheaper
    but are still good. My Carradice Overlanders (nothing like as well built as the Super C cotton duck
    ones) are now about 15 years old and still in fine shape and have been used day in, day out over
    most of that time (now used that way by a pal, they don't fit on the 12mm rack on the Streetmachine
    so I had to get new ones, dammit). I've upgraded the hooks to locking ones (but those are now
    standard and the old ones never broke) and the original buckles broke one by one and were replaced,
    but I've never had to do anything to the actual bags.

    I've now got Ortliebs (the lighter weight ones) and Altura Orkneys. The Orkneys are very nice bags
    but they've possibly over-egged the pudding in pocket provision and I think the fittings on the
    cheaper model a friend has (Skyes, I think) seem easier to use. If you do get Orkneys, sew a bit of
    tape around the carrying cord as it bites into your hand if you're carrying it by hand when it's
    full. I've never bothered using the raincovers: aside from the seams and zips they're pretty well
    proofed to start with and it's just another layer of faff. The Ortliebs are just so far ahead of the
    game when it comes to the fixings I find it hard to believe nobody else is catching on. They're
    easier to fit and remove and just as secure (picking them up by the handle disengages the locking
    clip, letting go locks it). They work on the One Big Bag principal, and though you can get pockets
    to attach it'll push up the price more and they look fiddlier to use than the built in zip ones on
    the likes of the Orkneys. Ortliebs have become the favoured weapon amongst my friends (or those that
    can afford them!) and none of us have any regrets about choosing them. Superbly made, simple and
    very effective designs.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > The Ortliebs are just so far ahead of the game when it comes to the fixings I find it hard to
    > believe nobody else is catching on. They're easier to fit and remove and just as secure (picking
    > them up by the handle disengages the locking clip, letting go locks it).

    The reason nobody else is using their excellent design is that ortlieb won't let them.

    cheers, clive
     
  7. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Clive George wrote: [Ortliebs]
    > The reason nobody else is using their excellent design is that ortlieb won't let them.

    Obviously, though just stuff like the stabiliser hooks are just done better than everyone else IME.
    They can't have *everyone* with most clues about pannier fixing design working for them, though the
    evidence suggests that may be the case...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  8. Asqui

    Asqui Guest

    John Hearns wrote:
    > I bought a pair of Altura Orkneys recently, for a trip to Scotland. I like them. I also use them
    > for commuting - and the quick release mechanism is useful there.
    >
    > I then saw that Wiggle have them for 65 pounds a pair. SO if you cna afford that, go to
    > www.wiggle.co.uk

    Ah. Yes, I saw that too, but the cheaper ones are the 2002 model which don't make it clear whether
    they have a shoulder strap. Then again it's net clear if the 2003 Orkneys come with rain covers!

    Also, what is the difference between the Orkney and the Skye?
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007187
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007183 Looks like the only difference is
    that the Skye is not (completely) made of the so-called Dura-Tec material, otherwise they look
    pretty identical.

    Dani
     
  9. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    asqui wrote:

    > Ah. Yes, I saw that too, but the cheaper ones are the 2002 model which don't make it clear whether
    > they have a shoulder strap.

    I got mine in 2001, and though they didn't have a shoulder strap there are solid loops on the end of
    the mounting rail where there's no problem clipping a strap on (the sort that are widely available
    from the likes of camera shops work fine). All you need to do is provide the shoulder strap, there's
    no needlework to do.

    > Then again it's net clear if the 2003 Orkneys come with rain covers!

    Mine did, and I've never used them, so I wouldn't let it worry you too much... The bags are more or
    less waterproof anyway, but if you want completely bombproof waterproof then you might as well get
    Ortlieb, Vau De or Carradice Super C where they're waterproof anyway without faffing about with
    covers that impede access to the bags and take up space when you're not using them. According to EBC
    the current model has a rain cover (they have the smaller Orkneys on offer at the mo, if you're
    thinking of lowriders too).

    > Also, what is the difference between the Orkney and the Skye?

    Slightly more dulux in terms of materials, number of pockets and fittings (fittings on Skye
    are plastic, alloy on Orkneys, zips are heavier duty, etc. and there's a rear pocket as well
    on the Orkney).

    I've got Orkneys, a friend has Skyes. Unless you want the extra pocket provision (dead handy for me
    on the 'bent as I can reach into them on the move by the simple expedient of putting them on
    backwards!) I'd say the Skye is probably better value in terms of bang/buck.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  10. Trealaw Boy

    Trealaw Boy Guest

    --------------7AE7D60E64E40FD28564F7E4 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    I'd endorse the comments about Ortlieb. Simply the best, but expensive.

    If you fancy something similar, try Vaude World Tramps. Very good at a slightly more modest price.

    asqui wrote:

    > John Hearns wrote:
    > > I bought a pair of Altura Orkneys recently, for a trip to Scotland. I like them. I also use them
    > > for commuting - and the quick release mechanism is useful there.
    > >
    > > I then saw that Wiggle have them for 65 pounds a pair. SO if you cna afford that, go to
    > > www.wiggle.co.uk
    >
    > Ah. Yes, I saw that too, but the cheaper ones are the 2002 model which don't make it clear whether
    > they have a shoulder strap. Then again it's net clear if the 2003 Orkneys come with rain covers!
    >
    > Also, what is the difference between the Orkney and the Skye?
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007187
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007183 Looks like the only difference is
    > that the Skye is not (completely) made of the so-called Dura-Tec material, otherwise they look
    > pretty identical.
    >
    > Dani

    Gearshift stock them

    www.gearshift.co.uk

    Regards

    TB

    asqui wrote:

    > John Hearns wrote:
    > > I bought a pair of Altura Orkneys recently, for a trip to Scotland. I like them. I also use them
    > > for commuting - and the quick release mechanism is useful there.
    > >
    > > I then saw that Wiggle have them for 65 pounds a pair. SO if you cna afford that, go to
    > > www.wiggle.co.uk
    >
    > Ah. Yes, I saw that too, but the cheaper ones are the 2002 model which don't make it clear whether
    > they have a shoulder strap. Then again it's net clear if the 2003 Orkneys come with rain covers!
    >
    > Also, what is the difference between the Orkney and the Skye?
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007187
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007183 Looks like the only difference is
    > that the Skye is not (completely) made of the so-called Dura-Tec material, otherwise they look
    > pretty identical.
    >
    > Dani

    --------------7AE7D60E64E40FD28564F7E4 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> I'd endorse the comments about
    Ortlieb. Simply the best, but expensive.
    <p>If you fancy something similar, try Vaude World Tramps. Very good at a slightly more
    modest price.
    <q>asqui wrote: <blockquote TYPE=CITE>John Hearns wrote: <br>> I bought a pair of Altura Orkneys
    recently, for a trip to Scotland. <br>> I like them. I also use them for commuting - and the
    quick release <br>> mechanism is useful there. <br>> <br>> I then saw that Wiggle have them for
    65 pounds a pair. <br>> SO if you cna afford that, go to www.wiggle.co.uk
    <r>Ah. Yes, I saw that too, but the cheaper ones are the 2002 model which don't <br>make it clear
    whether they have a shoulder strap. Then again it's net clear <br>if the 2003 Orkneys come with
    rain covers!
    <s>Also, what is the difference between the Orkney and the Skye? <br><a href="http://www.wiggle.co.-
    uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007187">http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID-
    =5360007187</a> <br><a href="http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007183">ht-
    tp://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007183</a> <br>Looks like the only
    difference is that the Skye is not (completely) made of <br>the so-called Dura-Tec material,
    otherwise they look pretty identical.
    <t>Dani</blockquote>

    <u>Gearshift stock them
    <v><a href="http://www.gearshift.co.uk">www.gearshift.co.uk</a>
    <w>Regards
    <x>TB
    <y>asqui wrote: <blockquote TYPE=CITE>John Hearns wrote: <br>> I bought a pair of Altura Orkneys
    recently, for a trip to Scotland. <br>> I like them. I also use them for commuting - and the
    quick release <br>> mechanism is useful there. <br>> <br>> I then saw that Wiggle have them for
    65 pounds a pair. <br>> SO if you cna afford that, go to www.wiggle.co.uk
    <z>Ah. Yes, I saw that too, but the cheaper ones are the 2002 model which don't <br>make it clear
    whether they have a shoulder strap. Then again it's net clear <br>if the 2003 Orkneys come with
    rain covers!
    <z>Also, what is the difference between the Orkney and the Skye? <br><a href="http://www.wiggle.co.-
    uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007187">http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID-
    =5360007187</a> <br><a href="http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007183">ht-
    tp://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007183</a> <br>Looks like the only
    difference is that the Skye is not (completely) made of <br>the so-called Dura-Tec material,
    otherwise they look pretty identical.
    <z>Dani</blockquote> </html>

    --------------7AE7D60E64E40FD28564F7E4--
     
  11. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Trealaw Boy wrote:
    > I'd endorse the comments about Ortlieb. Simply the best, but expensive.
    >
    > If you fancy something similar, try Vaude World Tramps. Very good at a slightly more modest price.

    Also note that EBC's own brand waterproof roll-tops are made for them by VauDe, and represent very
    good value AFAICT (I've had quite a close look at them, but in the end my 12mm rack tubing make the
    Ortliebs just too much easier. Hardly anyone bar HP Velotechnik owners have 12mm racks though, so
    don't let that put you off).

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
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