Panniers

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by elyob, Jan 14, 2005.

  1. elyob

    elyob Guest

    Anyone know anything about the Karrimor Aquator Panniers?

    Wiggle are offering them at 40% off at the moment (£52). I'm looking for a
    new set for touring this year. As usual, I want the best quality/lowest
    price!! I'm planning on carrying tent, sleeping bag, clothes etc for 1 week
    tours... They also have Karrimor Kalahari 60 Panniers which are 60 litres
    (10 litres bigger, but not waterproof).

    Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. Al C-F

    Al C-F Guest

    On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 19:57:36 GMT, "elyob" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Anyone know anything about the Karrimor Aquator Panniers?


    Yes. As with all panniers, whatever you are looking for is in the
    other one.
     
  3. On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 19:57:36 GMT, "elyob" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Anyone know anything about the Karrimor Aquator Panniers?
    >
    >Wiggle are offering them at 40% off at the moment (£52). I'm looking for a
    >new set for touring this year. As usual, I want the best quality/lowest
    >price!! I'm planning on carrying tent, sleeping bag, clothes etc for 1 week
    >tours... They also have Karrimor Kalahari 60 Panniers which are 60 litres
    >(10 litres bigger, but not waterproof).


    No experience of the Aquator (clever name) but having used both
    Kalahari and AnotherLeadingBrand of waterproof pannier, I would
    definitely go with the waterproof ones.

    That's not to say that the kalahari is a bad purchase - Mine lasted 10
    years, and are still going strong somewhere else in URCland. Any
    pannier can be made waterproof by the addition of a liner (Tesco sell
    them for about 10p each, and when they wear out they replace them
    free), but it is slightly more hassle.

    As for size, I'd go for the biggest you can. I don't beleive in
    travelling light. Having more space than you need give you flexibility
    in balancing the load, and also gives you contingency space (food,
    souevenirs, knackered chainsets etc)

    Oh, sorry, I haven't helped, have I !
    --
    Amazon: "If you are interested in 'Asimov's I-Robot',
    you may also be interested in 'Garfield - The Movie'.
    ... erm, how do they figure that one out?
     
  4. Julesh

    Julesh Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:
    <snip>
    >
    > No experience of the Aquator (clever name)


    One of those lumpy bits of Dartmoor where it never stops raining?


    Julesh
     
  5. elyob

    elyob Guest

    "Al C-F" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 19:57:36 GMT, "elyob" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Anyone know anything about the Karrimor Aquator Panniers?

    >
    > Yes. As with all panniers, whatever you are looking for is in the
    > other one.


    True.
     
  6. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:
    > No experience of the Aquator (clever name) but having used both
    > Kalahari and AnotherLeadingBrand of waterproof pannier, I would
    > definitely go with the waterproof ones.
    >
    > That's not to say that the kalahari is a bad purchase - Mine lasted 10
    > years, and are still going strong somewhere else in URCland. Any
    > pannier can be made waterproof by the addition of a liner (Tesco sell
    > them for about 10p each, and when they wear out they replace them
    > free), but it is slightly more hassle.


    Your Kalaharis have completed covered part of Martin's LeJoG (Leeds -
    John 'O'Groats, quite possibly covering familiar ground again) a
    successful heavy loading expedition to my parents over Christmas, and
    numerous shopping trips. They haven't replaced the EBC ones for work
    (Too big), but have allowed many more touring-esque trips than were
    previously possible.

    When I finally finish the rebuild (If I ever manage it!), I'll take a
    photo of the loaded up bike.

    > As for size, I'd go for the biggest you can. I don't beleive in
    > travelling light. Having more space than you need give you flexibility
    > in balancing the load, and also gives you contingency space (food,
    > souevenirs, knackered chainsets etc)
    >
    > Oh, sorry, I haven't helped, have I !


    On this point, I would suggest getting the waterproof ones. Not only
    will they keep your possessions dry, but they'll impose a limit on what
    you can take. I think this comes down to your style of touring!

    Jon
     
  7. elyob

    elyob Guest

    "Jon Senior" <jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOT_co_DOT_uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Richard Bates wrote:
    >>
    >> Oh, sorry, I haven't helped, have I !

    >
    > On this point, I would suggest getting the waterproof ones. Not only will
    > they keep your possessions dry, but they'll impose a limit on what you can
    > take. I think this comes down to your style of touring!


    Well, I deleted some of my original text. And that was Karrimor based. On
    the South Downs my older green Karri's went through the spokes. Yet I was
    carrying more weight than sensible.

    The more waterproof the better, I hope. So, I will probably buy the aquator
    ones.

    My style of touring? Always "far too bloody heavy" when I get on the road.
    Thereagain I don't have anyone to spread the load with.

    I did make Winchester => Brighton in a day and a half, with about 40% more
    than I should have taken. I got to Devils Dyke with a Karrimor (old green
    one) in my back spokes. Ow.

    So, the aqua ones are a good buy? Some people swear by Ortlieb, but I've not
    seen any deals. I did want to buy a replacement for my broken pannier, but
    it is better to buy them in sets. It is all about balancing the weight?

    My surviving Karri pannier is on the wrong side ... I prefer a commuting
    pannier to be on the offside. Anyone want a nearside pannier (full of spilt
    sunscreen).

    I reckon wiggle will get my biz in the next 24 hrs ...

    Could do with a new bike too. ;)
     
  8. > The more waterproof the better, I hope. So, I will probably buy the
    > aquator ones.


    Yeah, waterproof is _good_. The not having to faff about with bags is
    definately worth any extra money you have to pay - nice to be able to just
    chuck it in there and not worry.

    > So, the aqua ones are a good buy? Some people swear by Ortlieb, but
    > I've not seen any deals.


    The great thing I like about my Ortlieb roller thingies is that when I buy
    too much in the supermarket I can go home with the top unrolled and
    suddenly get much more space. The downside is that the roll top is a bit
    more of a faff opening and closing.

    > I did want to buy a replacement for my broken
    > pannier, but it is better to buy them in sets. It is all about
    > balancing the weight?


    The difference in weight between the bags will be dwarfed by the difference
    in weight between the things you put in 'em. If you don't get a discount
    for buying a set I'd be very tempted to buy the one replacement and have an
    objective test of which pannier is better.
     
  9. Paul Rudin

    Paul Rudin Guest

    "elyob" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Anyone know anything about the Karrimor Aquator Panniers?


    I know they're not Ortliebs :)
     
  10. "As for size, I'd go for the biggest you can. I don't beleive in
    travelling light. Having more space than you need give you flexibility
    in balancing the load, and also gives you contingency space (food,
    souevenirs, knackered chainsets etc"


    Bad move, someone gave me the same advice and foolishly I listened.
    Whatever size you get human nature means you will fill them and the first
    decent climb you will regret listening and buying the 'biggest you can'. My
    advice would be get the smallest you could manage with and pack them
    carefully, it is amazing what you can do without when you have to!
     
  11. "Dave Chadderton" <[email protected]>typed


    > "As for size, I'd go for the biggest you can. I don't beleive in
    > travelling light. Having more space than you need give you flexibility
    > in balancing the load, and also gives you contingency space (food,
    > souevenirs, knackered chainsets etc"



    > Bad move, someone gave me the same advice and foolishly I listened.
    > Whatever size you get human nature means you will fill them and the first
    > decent climb you will regret listening and buying the 'biggest you can'. My
    > advice would be get the smallest you could manage with and pack them
    > carefully, it is amazing what you can do without when you have to!



    I disagree. Spare capacity weighs next to nothing. Having space into
    which you can put the fleece, which has become too hot when the sun
    comes out is nice. So is space to put a day's food, when you decide on
    wild camping.

    Train yourself to pack sensibly, but don't blame a large pannier when
    you take too much gear!

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  12. Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
    > "Dave Chadderton" <[email protected]>typed
    >>Whatever size you get human nature means you will fill them and the first
    >>decent climb you will regret listening and buying the 'biggest you can'. My
    >>advice would be get the smallest you could manage with and pack them
    >>carefully, it is amazing what you can do without when you have to!

    >
    > I disagree. Spare capacity weighs next to nothing. Having space into
    > which you can put the fleece, which has become too hot when the sun
    > comes out is nice. So is space to put a day's food, when you decide on
    > wild camping.


    Or save yourself extra trips to the shops caused by not being able to
    fit everything you need into the panniers in one go.

    I'm tempted by these Aquators, but I want something I can get as much
    into as my old Karrimor Iberians. I don't suppose anyone knows the
    nominal size of these? It isn't marked on them.

    Colin McKenzie
     
  13. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Colin McKenzie wrote:
    > Or save yourself extra trips to the shops caused by not being able to
    > fit everything you need into the panniers in one go.
    >
    > I'm tempted by these Aquators, but I want something I can get as much
    > into as my old Karrimor Iberians. I don't suppose anyone knows the
    > nominal size of these? It isn't marked on them.


    How about:

    The Aquators + a trailer?

    If you don't want to shell out for one. Compare and contrast the B.O.B.,
    Kool-Stop Wildebeast and Weber monoporter, then build one. :)

    Jon
     
  14. Colin McKenzie <[email protected]>typed


    > I'm tempted by these Aquators, but I want something I can get as much
    > into as my old Karrimor Iberians. I don't suppose anyone knows the
    > nominal size of these? It isn't marked on them.


    43 litres comes to mind but I can't be sure.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  15. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 15/1/05 12:08 am, in article
    [email protected], "Julesh"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Richard Bates wrote:
    > <snip>
    >>
    >> No experience of the Aquator (clever name)

    >
    > One of those lumpy bits of Dartmoor where it never stops raining?


    No, it is the line on the body below which you are just as wet as above.

    ...d
     
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