Pantani

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Gonzo21, Feb 14, 2004.

  1. Gonzo21

    Gonzo21 New Member

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  2. Cipher

    Cipher New Member

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  3. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Regardless of all the scandal, he achieved more than 99.99% of us ever will. RIP.
     
  4. Tech72

    Tech72 New Member

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    With all due respect, no he didn't. Perhaps as a racing cyclist. Not as a human being.

    Tech72
     
  5. Spider1977

    Spider1977 New Member

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    Well there was no due respect! Unless you knew him personally how can you say that. If you believe everything that is written in the press about high profile people then more fool you.

    I thought he was a great character (on the bike) and loved watching him attack those mountains. As for what he did off the bike, that's his business.

    Let those without sin cast the first stone. Do you have a bag full of rocks?
     
  6. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    The guy had problems -- as Spider indicated with plenty of fairness, we all do. The guy was clearly troubled, and apparently suffered from clinical depression.

    Whatever the cause of his death, whatever the circumstances, whatever his mistakes, his sins, his screw ups, or his bad steps, he was a remarkable cyclist...

    ...and a remarkable cyclist or just another guy, his death is a tragedy. It stinks. He was a life. He had loved ones. Rest in peace, Pirate.
     
  7. tomdavis80

    tomdavis80 New Member

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    It's kind of sad to see some of that talent go away and somewhat wasted. He could have been equal to Lance in terms of his ability. But what can we say now? Not a whole lot. Rest In Peace, Pirate. Enjoy the afterlife on a bike.

    Thomas Davis
     
  8. labicci

    labicci New Member

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    Pantani, regardless of what the people over the world think of you, I and my cycling buddies always admires your climbing ability and fighting spirit. You are always our most beloved and respected cyclist.
     
  9. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    You've hit the nail on the head, my friend.
    Well said !
     
  10. JuneBug

    JuneBug New Member

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    Depression is a serious illness and can kill just like cancer or any other disease. I read in the article that he did try to seek help in some rehab place for depression. I know they have not determined how he died yet. But I just feel he was probably ...
    How can anyone understand what he was going thru?

    I hope he is with Coppi now riding the hills of Italy.
     
  11. Tech72

    Tech72 New Member

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    The point I was making is in reference to what the earlier poster wrote, that Pantani "achieved more than what 99.9% of us will ever". As a racing cyclist, absolutely, no doubt. But I disagree with a blanket statement like that. I don't know about you nor Pantani, but I can say I've achieved as much or perhaps even more in my personal and professional life than he did.

    As for the "with due respect" quote, it was a response to the poster himself as I diagreed with his point. It was not, as you pointed out, directed at Pantani. Read carefully.

    Cheers,
    Tech72
     
  12. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    As the poster of the 99.9% statement, I concur with your arguement. I should have been more specific in my inference. I should have noted that this relates to the determination it takes to achieve what he did on his bike (this being a cycling forum).

    (OTS) the depression he lived through, regardless of whether it was self-caused, is something that most of us do not have to face to the extent that he did.

    Regards
     
  13. tomdavis80

    tomdavis80 New Member

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    It's important to consider the fact that depression and mental illness affects athletes more than we'd like to think. Part of it has to do with the fact that they are encouraged to exude the aura of invincibility as well as not showing any weakness and showing that they aren't normal humans. Mental illnesses have a bad stigma in mainstream society but they are much worse in sports, much much worse.

    Thomas Davis
     
  14. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    I have to agree with you.
    When the adulation finishes, when the attention goes away, it can be very debilitating and it can affect people differently.

    It's sad that a cyclist like Marco was treated the way he was treated.
    In sports mad Italy, the man was a god.
    And the media attention on him (in good and bad times) was stifling.
    (In sporting terms, this man was a popular as USA's most famous
    football players or baseball players).

    None of us know what it must be like to be under this level of scrutiny.
     
  15. oneradtec

    oneradtec New Member

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    Rest in peace Marco. You were adored by the tifosi! Thanks for those wonderful cycling memories. You were a champion...and will never be forgotton.
     
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