Park Tool bike stand

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by TheFritoBandito, Mar 26, 2006.

  1. TheFritoBandito

    TheFritoBandito New Member

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    Does anyone use one of the folding Park Tool bike stands? I'm getting sick of working on my bike while it's upside-down. But the look of the Park stands doesn't inspire a lot of confidence...
     
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  2. fish156

    fish156 New Member

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    The Park PRS-15 is the real deal. It's expensive but solid as a rock. I have seen them in use at shops as the resident repair stands. I sprung for all of the extra goodies as well - carry bag, tool bucket, paper towel holder, and wheel truing attachment. It was on sale a couple of months ago at Nashbar, plus, I used a 10% off code, so I got a pretty good price. I pack up and work on friends bikes at their houses a lot, so it's perfect. Lot's of pro teams have been using this stand for years. When it's set up you have five points of contact to the floor and you can adjust three of them for a very stable base. I also have a Park PCS-4. It's a great stand and very solid but I am considering selling it. But it's not easily portable. I love the PRS-15. If you have the need to put your repair stuff on the road it's as good as you will find. Or, if you want something that will fold up and be put out of the way at home, it's also perfect for that. I have no regrets about spending the money on this stand.

    There are other foldable stands that are decent and I tried to look at them all, but none of them are as good as the PRS-15, IMHO. All of that being said, any decent repair stand makes working on your bikes sooooo much easier.
     
  3. TWOPBikeGuy

    TWOPBikeGuy New Member

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    I have the PRS-15, love it alot. The add ons make it easy with repairs too, like the towl mount and wheel true kit, but most importantly the bucket with tool belt. I work on my SC V10 (approx a 45lb bike) and have no balance issures!
     
  4. tourdelivermore

    tourdelivermore New Member

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    I bought the PRS-20 stand a couple of months ago...awsome.

    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/z...STANDARD&PRODUCT.ID=1540&CATEGORY.ID=51&MODE=

    No, I am not affiliated w/ competitivecyclist.com...that's where I bought it.

    It is very solid and compact. I love the fact that I can wash/work both sides of the bike. My old Blackburn gripped the top tube and could really only work on the drive side. It is bike friendly gripping the drop-outs...stays away from the top tube and seat posts which can be carbon and asymetrical. It folds down into a small package, but, is a little heavy as the tubes used appear to be heavy guage.

    Good Luck.
     
  5. fish156

    fish156 New Member

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    Apparently you are not the only one who thinks that stand is heavy (I think that's a good thing, myself). Park came out with a lighter version - the PRS-21 - this year. See:

    http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=23&item=PRS-21

    I think that the -20 folds up a bit more compact than the PRS-15. I looked long and hard at the -20 (as opposed to the -15) and the main thing that made me pick the -15 over the -20 was that I would rather ruin a seatpost than a bottom bracket tube. That's just my personal preference. The PRS-20 is really a nice stand. I have not played around with the new -21, but the other two we're talking about are built like tanks.
     
  6. rodenmg

    rodenmg New Member

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    I have the PRS-9 and absolutely hate it. Oh, it works ok. But, it's way to heavy to bother with folding up to carry around and because the legs do fold it's way to easy to knock over which I've done a couple of times. I cured the tipping problem by putting bolts through the hinged legs to prevent folding but now I have this huge and heavy stand with 4' long legs that doesn't fold up. :mad:
     
  7. remdog

    remdog New Member

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    Take a look at this http://www.ultimatesupport.com/s.nl/sc.21/category.60/.f

    Much cheaper than Park. I prefer it.


     
  8. tourdelivermore

    tourdelivermore New Member

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    Can you clarify the comment re: bottom bracket tube?

    The PRS-20, the bike simply sits on a rubber mount under the bottom bracket...it is not clamped and as a result applies no pressure on the bottom bracket. At first glance, it would appear not be be secure. However, after using the stand, the bike sits nicely, secured by the dropouts and doesn't move.

    Yea...I'm a fan of this workstand.
     
  9. fish156

    fish156 New Member

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    Sure. Ok, it's not clamped to the BB tube, it's strapped. So, any force you put on the frame when torqueing something down ends up getting absorbed by the BB tube, and as you say, the drop outs. If the bike is not secured to the stand by some component, then the stand is not going to do a very good job of holding it in position. So, any stresses you place on the frame are going to end up at the BB tube and the dropouts. In a "traditional" stand any stress is taken up by the seatpost (which is designed to take at least 200-300lbs of a riders weight). Seatposts are so much stronger than people think they are.

    This is just my opinion and what I think is going on. I just like the "traditional" design better. As I said earlier, I think the -20 is a very nice stand. But, my personal preference is for the -15 and this is why.
     
  10. tourdelivermore

    tourdelivermore New Member

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    The strap is goofy...I never use it and it's not necessary. The bike is secure by using the quick release on the fork dropouts - just like a the wheel.
     
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