Partially stripped crank thread

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Portable Splat Graphics, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. If you are careful and you know what your doing use a Tap and die set.
    * http://www2.northerntool.com/product/34565/ *
    Yea I said it, "tap and die"! :) long live funk :)

    CS

    "D T W .../\..." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Bought the beater home after lending it to a friend. Took his platforms
    > > off. Didn't find my clipless until I was about to put the bike into the

    > car
    > > so just hand-threaded the pedals in a few turns so I wouldn't loose them

    > on
    > > the way home. Got back at home and one of the kids jumped on it before

    > I'd
    > > tightened the pedals. They hit the gas and the pedal snapped out of the
    > > crank arm, ricocheting across the pavement, taking about 2 or 3 turns of

    > the
    > > crankarm thread with it. The torn thread was like a thin alloy spring
    > > coiled around the threads of the pedal.
    > >
    > > I think there is enough thread remaining so that the pedal would screw

    in
    > to
    > > the crank arm securely . I was wondering if any one had an good ideas
    > > before I start forcing bolts into partially stripped holes? I'd rather

    > not
    > > have to buy a new crankset. It's a Raceface Prodigy XC crankset.
    > > --
    > > Westie
    > > (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)
    > >

    >
    > It sounds like you have enough good thread to function. The pedals I've
    > looked at have 7 threads over their length, leaving you 4 good threads?

    I'd
    > try to screw the pedal in from the back side to see if you can clean out

    any
    > damaged thread, although it probably won't reach thru. If you can start

    it
    > from the front side without cross threading it you should be fine. If an
    > LBS is handy they may have a tap to clean up the thread. This all

    assumes
    > that your not some freeriding monster that breaks frames every other week
    > ;-) If you've broken cranks in the past it's probably not a good idea to
    > trust it. YMMV.
    >
    > --
    > DTW .../\.../\.../\...
    >
    > I've spent most of my money on mountain biking and windsurfing.
    > The rest I've just wasted.
    >
    >
    >
     
    Tags:


  2. Westie

    Westie Guest

    Bought the beater home after lending it to a friend. Took his platforms
    off. Didn't find my clipless until I was about to put the bike into the car
    so just hand-threaded the pedals in a few turns so I wouldn't loose them on
    the way home. Got back at home and one of the kids jumped on it before I'd
    tightened the pedals. They hit the gas and the pedal snapped out of the
    crank arm, ricocheting across the pavement, taking about 2 or 3 turns of the
    crankarm thread with it. The torn thread was like a thin alloy spring
    coiled around the threads of the pedal.

    I think there is enough thread remaining so that the pedal would screw in to
    the crank arm securely . I was wondering if any one had an good ideas
    before I start forcing bolts into partially stripped holes? I'd rather not
    have to buy a new crankset. It's a Raceface Prodigy XC crankset.
    --
    Westie
    (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)
     
  3. "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bought the beater home after lending it to a friend. Took his platforms
    > off. Didn't find my clipless until I was about to put the bike into the

    car
    > so just hand-threaded the pedals in a few turns so I wouldn't loose them

    on
    > the way home. Got back at home and one of the kids jumped on it before

    I'd
    > tightened the pedals. They hit the gas and the pedal snapped out of the
    > crank arm, ricocheting across the pavement, taking about 2 or 3 turns of

    the
    > crankarm thread with it. The torn thread was like a thin alloy spring
    > coiled around the threads of the pedal.
    >
    > I think there is enough thread remaining so that the pedal would screw in

    to
    > the crank arm securely . I was wondering if any one had an good ideas
    > before I start forcing bolts into partially stripped holes? I'd rather

    not
    > have to buy a new crankset. It's a Raceface Prodigy XC crankset.
    > --
    > Westie
    > (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)
    >


    It sounds like you have enough good thread to function. The pedals I've
    looked at have 7 threads over their length, leaving you 4 good threads? I'd
    try to screw the pedal in from the back side to see if you can clean out any
    damaged thread, although it probably won't reach thru. If you can start it
    from the front side without cross threading it you should be fine. If an
    LBS is handy they may have a tap to clean up the thread. This all assumes
    that your not some freeriding monster that breaks frames every other week
    ;-) If you've broken cranks in the past it's probably not a good idea to
    trust it. YMMV.

    --
    DTW .../\.../\.../\...

    I've spent most of my money on mountain biking and windsurfing.
    The rest I've just wasted.
     
  4. Reco Diver

    Reco Diver Guest

    "Portable Splat Graphics" <[email protected](NOSPAM)sympatico.ca> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > If you are careful and you know what your doing use a Tap and die set.
    > * http://www2.northerntool.com/product/34565/ *
    > Yea I said it, "tap and die"! :) long live funk :)
    >
    > CS


    I doubt that kit has a 9/16 x 20 L or a 9/16 x 20 R. They are pretty
    much bastard threads of the bicycle industry.

    R
     
  5. Reco Diver

    Reco Diver Guest

    "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Bought the beater home after lending it to a friend. Took his platforms
    > off. Didn't find my clipless until I was about to put the bike into the car
    > so just hand-threaded the pedals in a few turns so I wouldn't loose them on
    > the way home. Got back at home and one of the kids jumped on it before I'd
    > tightened the pedals. They hit the gas and the pedal snapped out of the
    > crank arm, ricocheting across the pavement, taking about 2 or 3 turns of the
    > crankarm thread with it. The torn thread was like a thin alloy spring
    > coiled around the threads of the pedal.


    Try running the pedal in from the back side of the crankarm, in order
    to clean out the threads. If there is a enough material left, you'll
    know it when you really lay into the pedal with a long pedal wrench.


    > I think there is enough thread remaining so that the pedal would screw in to
    > the crank arm securely . I was wondering if any one had an good ideas
    > before I start forcing bolts into partially stripped holes? I'd rather not
    > have to buy a new crankset. It's a Raceface Prodigy XC crankset.


    Eldi makes a threadsert (solid threaded insert) specifically for
    replacing the 9/16 x 20 threads in a stripped arm. You can check
    places like biketoolsetc.com or check with your local LBS ... if there
    any good they'll have the kit. It's a ~20.00 job at the LBS here.

    R
     
  6. Westie

    Westie Guest

    OK, thanks guys. I'll give that threading from the back a go.
    --
    Westie
    (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)
     
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